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Unmistaken Child

102 customer reviews

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$9.59 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

The Buddhist concept of reincarnation, while both mysterious and enchanting, is hard for most Westerners to grasp. Unmistaken Child follows the 4-year-search for the reincarnation of Lama Konchog, a world-renowned Tibetan master who passed away in 2001 at age 84. The Dalai Lama charges the deceased monk's devoted disciple, Tenzin Zopa (who had been in his service since the age of seven), to search for his master's reincarnation, a child who may be anywhere in the world. Tenzin sets off on foot, mule and even helicopter, through breathtaking landscapes and remote traditional Tibetan villages. He listens to stories about children with special characteristics, performs rituals and rarely seen tests designed to determine the likelihood of reincarnation, and eventually presents his chosen one to the Dalai Lama, who will make the final decision.

Review

Its privileged glimpse, deep into unfamiliar spiritual territory, has the strength of revelation. --Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

Its privileged glimpse, deep into unfamiliar spiritual territory, has the strength of revelation. --Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

Its privileged glimpse, deep into unfamiliar spiritual territory, has the strength of revelation. --Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: The Dalai Lama, Lama Konchog
  • Directors: Nati Baratz
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, Dubbed, NTSC, Subtitled, Surround Sound, Widescreen
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Oscilloscope Laboratory
  • DVD Release Date: November 3, 2009
  • Run Time: 102 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (102 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B002MZCSW4
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #47,525 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Unmistaken Child" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

134 of 135 people found the following review helpful By Loves the View VINE VOICE on September 12, 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A Buddhist Master dies. After sadness and mourning his young assistant sets out to find his master's re-incarnate. His journey begins with guidance from an astrologer. The search takes him, primarily on foot, through some of the most beautiful territory in the world. He visits rural people that eke out a living in pristine, rugged and remote areas of Nepal. I saw in the program that the quest took 4 years.

The child is found and is brought to the monastery for testing. Once validated, the child is accepted as the incarnate of the master and is given a new name and confirmed by the Dalai Lama. People come from far and wide pay homage to him.

The beauty of this movie extends beyond the fantastic scenery and ceremonies. The pure love the assistant had for his master, his treatment of the child and his utter confidence that the child is his master re-incarnate is touching and thought provoking. The uncomplicated devotion of the people to their religion and customs is as stunning as the scenery.

This is a look into an a highly ritualized not only religion but culture. Besides learning the process for chosing religious leaders you are behind the scenes of the monestaries where you see how the monks eat, sleep and relate. You are in the homes of the rural people who live as their ancestors. The people do not seem to notice the cameras. In scenes where they talk to the camera, they appear to be totally genuine.

I highly recommend this beautiful film for anyone interested in Buddhism and eastern religion or those interested in travel world cultures.
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59 of 60 people found the following review helpful By avoraciousreader on October 5, 2009
Format: DVD
Unmistaken Child
Dir Nati Baratz.

Warm, humorous, surprisingly accessible 5*

The local reviewer had made "Unmistaken Child" sound like an exercise in comparative religion and anthropology, a bit daunting and probably opaque to the non-initiated. I had read some Tibetan Buddhism decades ago, and of course read or watch the news about the continuing saga of the Dalai Lama and his following, so I decided to go anyway and was very pleasantly surprised. Instead of a hard slog, the film immediately grabbed me and I soon felt like I was scrambling through the Himalayan rocks with the disciple Tenzin Zopa. It didn't hurt that Tenzin was a charming and shyly charismatic young man with excellent English. While this film will take you very far away from New York or Oshkosh, it is a good trekking guide and if you are the sort who has any interest in seeing it to start with you should find it a joy to watch.

The story in brief: Tenzin had been the disciple of the renowned Geshe Lama Konchog for 21 years, beginning at age 7, when the Lama died at age 84, in 2001. After a period of mourning, it is determined that Tenzin must search for the reincarnation of Geshe-la so that the child may be given the chance to become a monk. The quest begins with a round of consultations, even leading down into India and the Tibetan exile community, dream interpretations and an astrological consultation ... via video from Taiwan! The contrast of the jetsetting lifestyle (accepted with aplomb) with Tenzin's more natural life in the mountains, is both instructive and the source of some gentle humor.
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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By ubalu on November 10, 2009
Format: DVD
The authentic spiritual traditions of the Far East are strong believers in rebirth and reincarnation. Law of karma and rebirth supposedly originated in Hinduism, but it is central to many religions. Siddhartha Gautama (approx. 600 BC), the founder of the Transcendence of Suffering, later known as Buddhism, was a Hindu prince and scholar from India. His teachings spread through much of the Far East and later to the West. As with any other religion, it has its versions in different areas of the world.

Tibetan Buddhist tradition finds its Masters who are reborn. `Unmistaken Child' is about the search for the incarnate of a Master who had recently left his body. He had given directions as to how to look for clues to find him. After finding some `signs' and consulting with an astrologer, Tenzin Zopa, a monk and the closest disciple, is given the task of finding his Master in the form of a child. After a taxing journey through villages visiting several probable candidates, he finds him.

The child in question identifies the objects the worship that he used in his past life (There are stories that the current Dalai Lama was chosen the same way after identifying prayer/meditation objects from his previous life). The child also recognizes his secluded private ashram. He is taken to the monastery with the permission of his parents so that he can resume his service as a Master.

The documentary has many interesting moments. The parents of the child giving him up, Zopa's love for the child, the role reversal of the disciple taking care of his Master who is now a little boy, and the monk raising the child are all touching.
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