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The Unofficial Guide to Ethical Hacking (Miscellaneous) Paperback – February 2, 2002

ISBN-13: 978-1931841726 ISBN-10: 1931841721 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: Miscellaneous
  • Paperback: 752 pages
  • Publisher: Course Technology PTR; 1 edition (February 2, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1931841721
  • ISBN-13: 978-1931841726
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 7.4 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,351,879 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

"Ethical hacking" may seem like an oxymoron, but to 17-year-old Indian high school student Fadia, it's a way of life. This book extends his Hacking Truths site (hackingtruths.box.sk), describing hackers as computer experts who do break into systems but refrain from causing damage. From password cracking to finding hacking utilities online, the ideas here will help intermediate to advanced readers protect their own systems and resolve situations ranging from lost passwords to viruses. While the writing is somewhat awkward, Fadia's voice and perspective shine through. Recommended for larger libraries.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Ankit Fadia is an independent computer security consultant based in Silicon Valley. He has authored several internationally best-selling books on numerous topics related to computer security, and he is a widely recognized computer security guru and cyberterrorism expert. Fadia provides customized cybersecurity training and consulting solutions to major clients all across North America, Asia, Australia, and the Middle East. He is also regularly invited by BBC Radio World News to share the latest updates on virus outbreaks, loopholes, and cybercrime trends. Recently, Fadia started his own computer security consulting and mobile phone solutions company based in Malaysia, with operations all across the Asian Pacific region.

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Customer Reviews

Just as the book, this guy is a sham.
N. Kiran
The single most useful piece of information this book contains is a single page where the URLs to SART and (I believe) CERT can be found!
Steven G. Bottoms
This book is a waste of time, money, ink and paper.
Stephen Kalman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Steven G. Bottoms on April 2, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was amazed when I finished scanning this book today. Quite frankly, I can't imagine why it was ever published! Aside from the fact that it was published this year (2002), and aside from the fact that the author appears to have used a Windows 95 machine to do his tinkering (I won't even give the author the respect of using the word "hacking"), this book is riddled with misinformation, inconsistencies, and uncommented source code (which incidentally only compiles, according to the author, on a version of *nix that very few people use). Any hobbyist with more than one year of experience knows AT LEAST what's covered in this book, and they probably don't even realize it! This book doesn't cover ANY of the new operating systems, doesn't take into account ANY basic security precautions that have been in use for a couple years now, and does the reader a disservice by trying to explain (poorly) what "hacker" and "cracker" means (clearly the author was trying to impress his friends with his knowledge of jargon). There are MANY more useful tomes on the market; don't waste your money on this book! The single most useful piece of information this book contains is a single page where the URLs to SART and (I believe) CERT can be found!
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 2, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is basically a word for word copy from freely avaliable online documents and other books. The author fails to mention the documents that he uses as sources for his factual information. The worst part is, some of the sources the author used were unreliable themselves. Talking about libnet like it is a program just shows how inexperienced the author is in the subject he is writing about. How could one possibly write a technical book about something they don't know much about. As for the ethical part, there is hardly anything ethical about breaking into other systems. If you want to know how the hackers really get in, get hacking exposed. Hacking Exposed pulls no punches on describing how it is actually done. Spend your money on better things.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 30, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is appalling. I have the Indian version and it is sloopily put together as well as dated. In addition, it is hardly ethical in any sense of the word when the author suggests that you use your ISP to hack.
In addition, I have found script references in the book that are not written by the author and yet he doesn't identify this fact. He leaves them as if he wrote them. Further some chapters are nothing more than just a cut and paste from existing websites that are not the author's work.
If I was the publisher, I would be looking more deeply into this author's credibility. If you are serious about security, get a book like ... If you just want to be a script kiddie, this will do you fine.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 4, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is awful. There are typos everywhere and some of the paths in the registry that he refers to are incorrect. After reading the book for only one day, I have returned it. Most of the information is available on the Internet with little searching. Also, as Microsoft is no longer supporting Windows 95, the author should look for a more current operating system. This book it is sloopily put together as well as dated.
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29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By A. Chopra on April 26, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is a waste of your hard earned money, because if you need scripts that don't work and doesn't help you at all in hacking or protecting yourself from a cracker, you can just get millions of those from the Internet for free. You don't have to pay a 14 year old kid to compile it and give it to you for US$49!
I bought this book because it had a very interesting title. I regret my decision of buying this book as there is nothing in it that can be used and it's taking up the space in my bookshelf. Maybe, I will throw this book or give it to someone (some people those who never say no to free things).
You don't have to pay US$ 49 for a book that has nothing but freely available scripts copied and pasted from the Internet.
As rightly mentioned in one of the reviews here, it's a waste of money, ink, paper, and time. You will end up throwing this book in a bin with learning only one thing how to be a bit smarter before buying a book that has an interesting title.
WHAT A WASTE!
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Niels Teusink on June 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
I read a couple of other hacking books, like Hacking Exposed and Hackers Guide. When reading this book I noticed it looks a whole lot like the guides to harmless hacking, which are available on the web for free. ...Don't be surprised when you're reading a chapter and suddenly the author gives you some "sample code" which turns out to be a program of about 12 pages, what was he thinking? That people are gonna retype it all? Why not just distribute the source over the internet. It also contains lots of typo's and technical mistakes.
But most important, the information in this book doesn't take you an inch further if you've read a couple of texts on the web, unless you really want to know how you can change your windows startup logo.
Also what bothers me, the books should be about ethical hacking, but the author discusses all kinds of destructive things, things that can only be used to create havoc, at his website he even has a tutorial on how to deface websites (not that it would help anyone because it is hopelessly outdated)
If you really want to learn how to check a website's security, and don't care about changing the way your windows 95 looks, maybe you should read Hacking Exposed instead. The Unofficial Guide to Ethical Hacking isn't worth the money by far, just get some texts of the web for free and you'll have the same information, 90% of the time even better written.
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