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Until The End Of The World: Music From The Motion Picture Soundtrack Soundtrack

4.8 out of 5 stars 53 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Soundtrack, December 10, 1991
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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Until the End of the World: Music From the Motion Picture Soundtrack

Amazon.com

This 1991 companion to German director Wim Wenders's film sets a high water mark for the intelligent use of cutting-edge popular (and we're using that term in its broadest sense) music on film, deservedly cracking onto critical lists for the best releases of that year, period. The contemplative thriller's setting at the end of the millenium is answered by a remarkable repertory of artists including Talking Heads, Neneh Cherry, Lou Reed, Elvis Costello, R.E.M., Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds, Patti Smith, Jane Siberry with k.d. lang, T-Bone Burnett, Daniel Lanois and U2, a de facto dream team. Nearly all these performances were unheard at the time of release, and beyond the evident marquee lustre there's an underlying cohesion to the sense of yearning that prevails. Both Cave and U2 build powerful songs around the title theme, Elvis offers a brilliant Ray Davies cover, and the Siberry/lang classic, "Calling All Angels," summarizes the spiritual underpinnings of this thoroughly modern, ultimately timeless classic in film music. --Sam Sutherland
  • Sample this album Artist - Artist (Sample)
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1:59
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5:18
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2:37
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2:57
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5:33
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5:07
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7
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by Can
3:35
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8
30
by R.E.M.
4:49
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9
30
4:49
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10
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0:52
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11
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4:38
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5:00
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3:53
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0:45
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5:14
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16
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3:07
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3:50
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by U2
4:33
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0:58
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (December 10, 1991)
  • Original Release Date: December 10, 1991
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Soundtrack
  • Label: Warner Bros.
  • ASIN: B000002LQZ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #66,283 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
It definitely has to be among the top 5 soundtracks of all times. This outstanding work to go along with the road movie of all times, "Until The End Of The World," by wunder director, Wim Wenders, went beyond where most soundtracks had gone before it came out (1991) and set the pace for great soundtracks to come later on (The Insider, Traffic and others).
Simply put the soundtrack gathered the cream of the music scene: opening and closing tracks in charge of Graeme Revell/David Darling; mood swings in charge of Talking Heads, Depeche Mode, Elvis Costello, Lou Reed, REM, Nick Cave, Patti Smith, Daniel Lanois and U2, among others; and one of the most beautiful songs of all times, "Calling All Angels" by Canadian Jane Siberry, topping it all.
The one big missing song from this album is the very special version of "Blood Of Eden" that Peter Gabriel rearranged for this movie, in one of its most beautiful moments: when Solveig Dommartin and William Hurt's plane peacefully lands after all electronic devices fail to operate due to a nuclear explosion. Otherwise, it's one of those perfect soundtracks.
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Format: Audio CD
I first heard this soundtrack being played at a friend's place back around 1992-93(?). I bought it a couple years later, having been completely impressed by what I heard and not being able to forget it. All the songs are great. Someone else titled their review "The greatest soundtrack ever". You'd be hard-pressed to find an argument against this claim.

This soundtrack holds a particularly special place in my musical memory, because it was the "soundtrack" of my life while living at one of my first apartments. I had loads of incredible times in this place, and it seemed this CD was alwyas in my CD player. I was hooked on it. It was playing during a particularly memorable time for me... while I was getting to know a young lady who had just moved in across the hall from me. It was late Summer... warm nights but comfortable enough for the windows to be flung open. This CD was PERFECT in every way! The music seemed to lend itself to the moment and to that time of the year. A great mood-creating soundtrack. I can say no more!

Lou Reed, K.D. Lang, Elvis Costello, Depeche Mode, U2...... one great song after another. This COULD very well be the greatest soundtrack ever.
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Format: Audio CD
This has to be one of the most ignored soundtracks of the decade, and the sad part of that is it is one of the best soundtracks of the century. Graeme Revell has established himself as a great film score composer with movies like "The Crow," and "Strange Days," so his music here is no less poignant and ethereal. Very fitting and beautiful. U2's "Until the End of the World" was already a great song on "Achtung Baby," so merely a different version can't hurt too much. If anything, it is the title song so how can it be bad? Depeche Mode's "Death's Door" is a peaceful little song from the "Songs of Faith and Devotion" outtakes and it fits the mood of the film and the soundtrack very well. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, the Talking Heads, and Lou Reed, all dark in their own unique ways, but essentially the best at what they do, provocative emotional music. Same with Elvis Costello and Patti Smith, and REM make for a good addition. Julee Cruise's voice astounded me when she sang for "Blue Velvet" and "Twin Peaks," so to hear it again on this album was a beautiful experience. To put it simply, this album is bursting with great music that speaks to the soul, and it complements the film appropriately. The only complaint I have is "how can you do a soundtrack album without Peter Gabriel if his song was in the movie?" Yes they got Gabriel's pseudo-partner Daniel Lanois, but where's Peter? His song in the film made it all the more visceral. Other than that, this is one of the best soundtrack albums of all time.
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Format: Audio CD
"Details" Magazine recently released a list of thier top cd's in 50 different, offbeat, unique catagories. One of the catagories was "Most Underrated Soundtrack Album" and the winner was this outstanding cd. When I saw this it totally made my day...I had forgotten how great this cd is and I applaud Details for reminding me about this hidden gem. The songs here are marvelous, some of my favorites include the Lou Reed song ("What good is Sanskrit read to a pony?") and the U2 song (which is slightly different than the Achtung Baby version). The only thing that was in the movie that never made it to the cd is the epiphanously beautiful "Blood of Eden" by Peter Gabriel, which is played right at the film's climax. This song is an early version of the song that appeared in his album "US". It features Peter Gabriel only (not the duet with Sinead O'Connor) and is stripped down to its most poignant essence. The only place this song was ever made available was as a B-Side from Gabriel's import cd-single Steam (I think), released around 1993-94. If they rerelease this cd they would be wise to include this obscure but unforgettable gem.
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