Trade in your item
Get a $0.85
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Until We Meet Again: A True Story of Love and Survival in the Holocaust Paperback


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.95 $12.82
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 310 pages
  • Publisher: Miracle Press; Subsequent edition (2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0964712407
  • ISBN-13: 978-0964712409
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,095,835 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This chaste Holocaust memoir perfectly illustrates how a great and moving story can fail to be a great and moving book. Television producer Korenblit and Janger, the director of a national writing competition, use conventional terms to relate an extraordinary story. In 1942, Korenblit's parents, Manya and Meyer, were teenagers in love in Hrubieszow, Poland. But they were also Jewish and soon found themselves torn from their families and each other as they were shifted from camp to camp. Before they were separated, though, the two promised to meet in their hometown at the end of the war, which they did--two of the fewer than 200 surviving members of the 8000-strong Jewish community that had lived in Hrubieszow before the war. The writing here just is not as powerful as the facts, however. One strategic choice depletes much of the suspense: Korenblit reveals in an introduction that while researching the book, he discovered one of his mother's brothers living in England. It's a fantastic detail, initially well told, but by the end, when it is repeated, it sounds pedestrian. Other techniques lessen dramatic effect. For example: while in the camps, Manya kept an ersatz diary, jotting down daily events in terse lists such as ``Cyvia, joy, horrible condition, no hair, Cyvia better, new friend, replaced shoe, washed dress, farmwork'' which she rolled into tight cylinders and concealed in her hair. Rather than relying on the lucidity of those original notes, Korenblit and Janger imagine what Manya would have written had she had the paper and the time.

Copyright 1995 Cahners Business Information, Inc.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
27
4 star
5
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 32 customer reviews
This is a great book you need to read!
Bob Bob
This book reads like fiction, so it is easy to forget that the story is TRUE.........and all of the horror and sadness was real.
jemima Jones
I loved reading this book, it was hard puting down once I started.
Lindsey 16

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Melanie on December 22, 2000
Format: Paperback
"Until We Meet Again" was a wonderful, true Holocaust story that, in my opinion, ties with "Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl" as the best Holocaust books.
When two Polish Jews, Meyer and Manya, both 17, and their families decide to go into hiding from the Nazis, there troubles are just beginning. Manya and her 14-year-old brother, Chaim, decide to leave her family's dangerous hideout and go with her boyfriend, Meyer. Together, they go through various hiding places and worsening concentration camps all over Europe. Trying to survive day by day, they often wonder if they will ever be free again. Meyer and Manya survive, however, with their great faith and love for each other - but how? Will they ever see their families again? Can they ever be happy... and free?
This was a great, inspirational story, written by the couple's son. It can be read and enjoyed by a large age group, anywhere from middle schoolers, teens, and adults. It really helped me to see the true horror of the war, and I would highly recommend it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
"Until We Meet Again" by Michael Korenblit and Kathleen Janger, is by far one of the best Holocaust stories I have ever read (which is really saying something because I am Jewish and have heard/read many stories). This nonfiction novel is about the love and survival of Manya Nagelsztajn and Meyer Korenblit in the Holocaust. The story begins at the beginning of the Holocaust where Manya and Meyer lived in Hrubiezow, Poland. The story later develops and takes Manya and Meyer into different concentration camps in Poland. As Manya parted from her parents forever Manya's mother said, "`Maybe one of us will survive'...Well, that was just what happened. Manya was the lone survivor. She resolved that although her family was dead, their faces and her memories of them would live forever inside her heart" (Page 294-295). This novel describes the themes about kindness, equality, racism, determination, survival, hope, and love. In this novel it explains how love can be that tiny piece of hope that makes each day worth living (or trying to live) for. An example is when Meyer said to himself, "There was only one thing he must do: stay alive, so that he could be with her again" (page 216).

Author, Michael Korenblit, is Manya and Meyer's son. His friend is Kathleen Janger and together they helped Manya and Meyer to release the horrors of their past, to share with the world. During the composition of this novel, Michael and Kathleen come across the name of Manya's brother Chaim in a directory of England. The reunion of Chaim and Manya and Meyer was rejoiced, because for about thirty years they each thought the other was dead.

Michael and Kathleen's writing style is quick and to the point.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
I can never learn enough about the Holocaust. It surprises me that as much as I've read I always learn something new. UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN is something new. This true story follows a young couple through their experiences in WWII, describing injustices that you may have heard before and ones that you certainly haven't. A candid read that doesn't resort to gruesome retellings, the story of the courage and luck of these two kids blew me away. Suitable for 6th graders and enjoyable for adults.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is an awesome book. I just finished learning about the Holocaust in a history class, but this put everything into perspective. I usually like books that I can relate to more or that have to do w/ teens like myself, but this is a book that I could never put down, I read it from cover to cover in 2 days! Because of this book, I am looking forward to reading other books that are related to history, it really opened my eyes to a new genre of literature.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By jemima Jones on January 15, 2003
Format: Paperback
I was given this book by a dear friend and am so glad she shared it with me. The story of the survival of Manya and Meyer is one I will not soon forget. This book reads like fiction, so it is easy to forget that the story is TRUE.........and all of the horror and sadness was real. It broke my heart - though the strength of both Manya and Meyer ought to be inspiration to us all. Great read!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 22, 2000
Format: Paperback
This true story of young love and survival during the holocaust is extrememly well-written. It is exciting, sad, triumphant, horrific, almost unbelieveable at times (as the true story is all of these things!) I was very impressed with the quality of the writing, and believe that this story should be read and remembered throughout the ages.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book was very exciting and shows how two young lovers can triumph threw anything. This book is very inspirational and shows in detail the hardships the Jews had to indure during WWII.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Anyechka on June 23, 2007
Format: Paperback
I'll admit that this book started out a little slowly for me, but by about chapter 18, I began to be drawn more and more into the story of teenage sweethearts Manya and Meyer, Manya's little brother Chaim, and their friends (even though the writing style employed wasn't always that dramatic or riveting). The story begins when Manya and one of her brothers, Chaim, make the very difficult decision to leave their family in the hiding place in the wall of their house in the ghetto of Hrubieszow to join Meyer's family hiding in a haystack, in 1942. Perhaps I would have been more drawn into the story initially had it begun earlier on and slowly introduced the characters and situation, instead of starting off rather in media res. And perhaps the events might have come even more alive for me had the book been written in the first person instead of by two secondhand parties. It also kind of kills the dramatic surprise by revealing at the beginning that Chaim was discovered in early 1982, with the reader knowing all along he survived instead of only saving it for the epilogue, when it would have had far greater dramatic effect.

All that said, however, the book does a rather good job at conveying the increasingly trapped and horrific situation the characters found themselves in. Many of the decisions they made, and breaks from outsiders they got which ended up contributing to their eventual survival, could be attributed to only luck, since many other people in similar situations might have had far different fates for making or not making those same decisions. After leaving the haystack, Manya, Meyer, and Chaim returned to the new ghetto in Hrubieszow, where they were put to "legitimate" work, though always in constant danger of brutality and deportations.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa339f114)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?