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Up from Slavery (Dover Thrift Editions) Paperback – Unabridged, October 4, 1995


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 11 and up
  • Grade Level: 6 and up
  • Series: Dover Thrift Editions
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications (October 4, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486287386
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486287386
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (78 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,184 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Booker T. Washington was a great man.
Samuel C. Pence
You can achieve the impossible through hard work and determination.
Alida Francheska Timmos
Well I ended up staying up all night reading this book.
illyz

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 40 people found the following review helpful By illyz on February 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
Let me start off by saying I'm a 16 year old female...
Upon looking through the history section of the store I discovered "Up From Slavery", the autobiography of Booker T. Washington. I could easily recall reading about him in US history. Interested, I decided to buy it.. Well I ended up staying up all night reading this book.
Washington entails his life story of endeavers and prosperity gained. He describes of how he raised himself up from slavery through sacrifices and struggles. With the self-reward of obtaining education he decided to develope the Tuskegee Institution to help further educate his peoples. As well he established a bond between, not only blacks and whites, but southerners and northerners (during post-civil war times). He talks on how as people, one should educate themselves not only in books but in labor as well. In doing so, one will achieve full-on success.
"Up from Slavery" enlightened me so much more on Washington and his role in shaping the free life we as americans, live today. I have gained an enormous amount of respect for this intriguingly compelling man. I really do feel a great sensation of pride in our history when I think about Washington and his achievements for this nation. Beautiful.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By stevejd@hotcoco.infi.net on February 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
Everyone should read "Up From Slavery" by Booker T. Washington. Washington was one of the most outstanding people in our history. If he lived today he probably would become President and be one of our greatest Presidents. He had an iron will to achieve his goals in life and to do something to help his people. He started in life in slavery, born to a single mother. Later on he was abused and exploted by his step-father. He overcame tremendous hardships to get an education. He then dedicated his life to helping other African-Americans to improve their lives. He is often criticized for compromising too much with the white establishment. I think however that people need to understand the difficulties of his time and also his way of trying to change people indirectly rather than through direct confrontation. "Up From Slavery" is a great example of this. It is also fun to read. I have a personal reason for liking Washington. In World War II my father was in the Air Corps. For some time the bomber he flew in was protected by the famous Tuskeegee Airmen who were trained at Tuskeegee Institute, founded by Washington. The Tuskeegee Airmen never lost a plane that they escorted. So you see, if it hadn't been for Booker T. Washington I might not be here.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 26, 1999
Format: Paperback
"Up From Slavery" brought to light the real deal behind the man Booker T. Washington. Before reading it, I was taught to believe that he accommodated and assimilated himself and the African American race to that of the white race. It has to be made known that Booker T. Washington was born into an era where the slave mentality was not only prominent but socially acceptable. To understand his conservative efforts, you'd have to understand the fact that he achieved everything in life by hard labor. Therefore, in order to promote economic and social equality, he had to promote issues that led to these things. In other words, he felt that the newly freed blacks were not ready to integrate themselves into white society, a society that did not respect their freedom at all. He wanted African Americans to embrace a nationalistic attitude before asking white society to embrace it. If blacks were seen as the uncouf beings that we were thought to be...acceptance would never occur. So, in using every resource available including accommodation, Washington underhandedly promoted social and racial equality for all.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 21, 1999
Format: Paperback
Booker Washington rose to fame as a great American because of his intense understanding of the American system of government and his ability to stay focused. Booker obviously understood the impact of slavery on his race and that freedom alone was not enough in a country that did not respect that freedom. Booker's ideology coincided with that of Frederick Douglas who would have made the speech at the Atlanta Exposition, but he died earlier that year.Booker's speech was "nationalistic" as he told his listeners to be as seperate as the fingers on the hand and to cast down your buckets where you are. It appears to me that he prefered separation, and individualized education geared towards economic empowerment of the newly freed "negroes". 90% of all the black people in this country had been slaves and lived below the Mason-Dixon Line. The other 10% were free, yet not free. Tuskegee (Institute) University attests to his abilites as a monument builder. "Up From Slavery" is a story within a story. Booker T. Washinton, according to Louis Harlan was a "wizard". Even W.E.B. Dubois in his latter years, prior to joining the Communist Party began to agree with many of Washington's philosophies. Booker T. Washington was a politican and a technicrat. He got the job done.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on February 16, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a very well-written statement of the conservative approach to the quest for Black equality. Written as Booker T. Washington's autobiography, it is important to keep in mind that part of the purpose of this book was to recruit donors to fund the Tuskegee Institute--which meant that Washington needed to emphasize that he was an accomodationist and not in any way a radical. That being said, some of the sentiments expressed in this book seem very over-optimistic in retrospect. For example, Washington says he believes that whites in the South will grant blacks full political rights of their own accord, when blacks are mature enough to deserve them, because people are innately good and will do the right thing. The end of Reconstruction and the advent of Jim Crow laws, along with the intensity of the battle for civil rights, showed him to be mistaken on that point--which is partly why he was eventually eclipsed as a leader by W.E.B. DuBois. Still, this book is a fascinating autobiography and a great statement of the moderate, gradualist approach to attaining equality.
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