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Product Details

  • Paperback: 282 pages
  • Publisher: lulu.com (November 8, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1300335610
  • ISBN-13: 978-1300335610
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,831,306 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Mark McClelland studied Computer Science and Creative Writing at the University of Michigan's Residential College, where he won a Hopwood Award for poetry. After graduating in 1994, he promptly sold his soul to his software career, and is now struggling to claw it back. He writes in search of truths that defy simple, direct expression, and publishes to share his discoveries with others. He lives in Chicago with his wife, Nancy, and two cats, and is currently working on a few different projects, including a follow-up to "Upload".

Mark's debut novel, "Upload", is a winner of the ForeWord Reviews 2012 Book of the Year Award in Science Fiction, and was listed among the Best Books of 2014 by Chicago Book Review.

If you enjoyed "Upload" and are hoping for a sequel, send @markproxy a message on Twitter, and be sure to mention #uploadthenovel.

Customer Reviews

I had a great sense of who the main character was throughout the book.
lovetoread
I started reading Upload right away, but like most books I start, I got distracted by other things and it sat on my nightstand, unread.
Zak Jacobson
I think this second portion of the book is one of the best science fiction stories I've read.
Literary Litter

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jim Grisham on November 10, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Review of Upload (Kindle Edition) by Mark McClelland

By Jim Grisham; Saturday, November 10, 2012

Upload by Mark McClelland is a complex and thought-provoking, yet accessible foray into the life of a brilliant but troubled young man, Raymond Quan, and his quest to escape from a world that has done little to inspire loyalty in the orphaned engineer.

It almost troubles me to call this a story of science fiction - it begins about fifty years from today, but the subject matter seems entirely plausible and may be mirrored in reality much sooner. People in Raymond's time seek recreation, pleasure, and sometimes analogues of unremarkable everyday life in virtual reality environments that can be programmed with nearly limitless scenarios and environments.

It is not a stretch to see something similar soon coming to pass in our world, a world where many people are already living somewhat virtual lives through social networks and online gaming. If this virtual environment exists and we can interact with it, could we go one step further and live nearly full-time in this environment, extending our lives with machines; perhaps eventually eschewing the human body altogether and become immortal? If we can do such things, should we? These topics have been broached many times over the years, both in popular media and in non-fiction, but Upload presents a fresh perspective on what could otherwise be a tired subject, in a tangential way to Richard Powers' acclaimed 1995 work Galatea 2.2.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Derek on June 28, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The idea of uploading human minds into a computer system is one I've long been interested in. But the story that propels the concept is weak. The characters are not that interesting, and in the main character's case, he's pretty unlikable from the outset. Made it hard to care what happened to any of them. I found myself slogging forward just to get to the concept of uploading and the philosophical issues therein. That alone was worth the read, if that's your cup of tea. I'd suggest a rewrite. Better character development; shorter, tighter narrative; and don't meander. Stick to the main storyline. Anything that doesn't directly add to the plot should be removed.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By max davenport on March 3, 2013
Format: Paperback
'Upload' is a fine debut novel that blends elements of science fiction, crime novel, and bildungsroman to tell the story of a brilliant but emotionally stunted programmer's attempts to transfer his intelligence and personality into a computer. He succeeds, but he doesn't find the escape he hopes for.

In its first half, 'Upload' slowly builds tension as it details the last months of its protagonist Raymond Quan's physical life. Raised mainly as a ward of the state, Raymond is driven by a code of self-discipline and a mania for security and surveillance. Emotionally, he's cold and formless -- a jellyfish in a suit of armor. His entire existence is devoted to uploading himself into the experimental computer simulation he's helping to program, escaping a world he's hardly experienced for his own carefully crafted virtual realm. As he plots and maneuvers toward this goal, his life is complicated by a private eye, the police, and his first romance, with Anya, one of his fellow team members on the Upload Project. Once Raymond manages to upload himself, he finds that despite his obsessive planning he's given up all control and security.

'Upload' is at its strongest for me as a heist story and in the way it spins off ideas about the nature of the self and of community. The nitty-gritty details of Raymond's scheme to steal and secure the hardware needed to create and store his virtual self are fascinating, as are the discussions among the novel's characters of the complexities involved in 'uploading', and the possibilities and limitations of a virtual life. It's also a closely observed character study of a somewhat unlikable character. There are times when long, expositionary conversations between characters throw off the pacing a bit, and the novel's redemptive conclusion wasn't quite convincing to me. But it's an ambitious and thought-provoking book about a very believable near-future.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 13, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
On the whole this was an interesting story while not completely original in its concept. The characters were OK. Many seem to not like the main character but I found him relateable in his imperfection. What I could not stand was how the story seemed to unravel toward the end and the end itself. I honestly thought my Kindle had an issue and skipped ahead. A cliff hanger or semi ambiguous ending is OK if done well. This was not. It seems the end here was only crafted to setup sales for s second book. There are ways to leave a story open to a sequel while still giving the reader the sense of a complete experience. This book did not achieve that. Authors need to be up front that this is part 1 of 2 if they are going to do this.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Literary Litter on December 2, 2013
Format: Paperback
This book is really tricky to review. It's separated into two portions. The first portion I found dry and dull. I had to force myself to continue reading it for two full weeks before I finished it. I wasn't interested in any of the characters or what was going on with them. I'll admit a little fascination with the technical part of the world and the projects they're working on. It's easy to see their world and imagine we'll be there in a matter of years.

But, here's the tricky part. Once I reached the second portion of the book, I couldn't stop reading! I am amazed at Mark's work here. Not only has he created a digital Utopia and figured out how to move people to it, but he's created this intense character study. If you have a person's life and change one tiny aspect, how much does it change the person? What if we could all just reboot ourselves from a save point? I think this second portion of the book is one of the best science fiction stories I've read. It's in depth and unreal while at the same time with a huge portion of plausibility.

I gave it an immense amount of thought. The first portion of the book is mostly stage setting, but it really is necessary for the second part of the book. As I was reading, I found my mind jumping back to section one and thinking, 'Oohh! That's why that mattered and I had to suffer through it!' It's sort of an 'eat your vegetables so you can have dessert' thing. Even though I didn't enjoy the first part of the book, it was basic and necessary to the second part, which I loved!

Both parts working together end up to be a great read that will stick with you and have you thinking long after you've finished it. I'll admit it's pretty rough getting through the first part, but it's definitely worth it.
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