"Used" 7D Now and then I see a used 7d listed by sellers in Amazon for low around $1000 (body) to $1200 (with kit lens). These listings don't last long. How could these be used when it is just released? Could they be pre-production demo models with bugs? Has anyone bought one of these? Thanks for sharing your experience.
[UPDATED] asked by Joe C. on October 19, 2009
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This is a total scam. Unless the buy is through amazon (even if offered from another vendor) it is BS. Anyone that mentions wiring money to them is a thief. I know from first hand experience because I did it once years ago for a Canon 5D. Priced ridiculously cheap by another vendor on amazon. Somehow, the fact that it was on amazon gave the listing authority. What people don't realize is that amazon does not have the ability to keep all this stuff off their site. It would probably be impossible. They do now state pretty clearly: Don't participate in offers that involve wiring money. Also, the official amazon email that comes along on these scams is also a scam. They are carefully constructed counterfeits. Has nothing whatsoever to do with amazon. I'm a bit embarrassed to admit that I fell for a scam like this hook, line, and sinker. All the signs were there that is was a scam but I didn't want to believe it. The only thing I wanted to believe was that I was going to get this absolutely astonishing deal and I went into hyper self-delusion mode. I even ignored the guy at Western Union when he told me that there had been a large number of scams involving wiring money to Romania. (where the party selling the camera was) Yeah, when the camera arrival date came and went I realized I had made a most stupid and common mistake and lost a considerable amount of money. The old adage absolutely applies: If it's too good to be true, it is. No authorized dealer anywhere can sell a new camera for less than what the manufacturer declares the selling price to be.
It's embarrassing to admit all this stuff but if it saves one person from making the same stupid mistake I did then it serves the purpose.
James D. Sigrist answered on October 23, 2009

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I also recently nearly got scammed by the Screentek listed seller. But it was for a large plasma TV. The story is much the same. I contacted the seller first though asking for details as the price seemed too low to be believed (ie, was it damaged, etc.) He said, no its new and promised warantee and 30-day no questions ask refund ability AND that shipping was free (on a 150 pound TV!) and would be sent airmail so I would have it in 2-3 days after paying.

Went through the whole deal about setting up a special Amazon international market arrangement with the supposed seller, etc. Amazon had sent an email warning never to send moneygram orders. So when I got the 98% accurate email from "Amazon" (there were just enough typos and grammer errors to suggest this was done through an online translation program or someone who doesn't use English as a 1st language) I forwarded the email to Amazon and they said they had nothing to do with it and it was a scam.

The amazing thing is this: Screentek seems to be a REAL company based out of Houston, TX. They have apparently several years of work in the business of replacing computer and other digital screens (but I have no idea if they deal with cameras or plasma TVs! Probably not!). THere are apparently real accolades and articles about them on real websites and computer news journals (well, who knows what is real on the internet but this seems genuine). Anyway, the thing is whoever this seller was apparently had researched screentek pretty closely because the name I was supposed to send the moneygram order to was named "Elisabeth Williams" though she was in Italy. Interestingly it is also "Elisabeth Williams" who is listed as the Operations Manager on the real Screentek, Inc website. So if I had googled Elisabeth Williams and Screentek together this page would have come up and everything would have seemed legit. This must be some large mafia scam or something similar and they must have reasonable success to keep trying it. I do wish Amazon would do a better job of notifying the public of the KINDS of scams that are common through their site (and spell out the methodology) so that it would be harder to sucker people even when it seems obvious they are being suckered. Also, whoever the Screentek seller was on amazon they used the actual Screentek logo with their seller page so it looked just like the real Screentek, Inc website!
R. Conway answered on November 2, 2009

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One more thing. The reason the listings don't last long is because amazon finds them and deletes them. At least, I think that's how it goes. In my case, I had copied the email address and thought about it overnight. When I looked the next day, the listing was gone. I wrote to the guy to ask if it was still available. He must have smiled broadly thinking: "I've got one on the line." Unfortunately, he did. He really had one on the line. So like it or not, that year I helped out the Romanian economy.
James D. Sigrist answered on October 23, 2009

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Yes, it is too good to be true. Amazon should check on these vendors.
Joe C. answered on October 22, 2009

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I, too, wrote to Screentek and asked about the camera (7D): condition, Gray market vs. USA, warranty, etc. Everything sounded good, so I "purchased" the camera through Amazon and was told it was denied by the seller. When I contacted Amazon, they said that the camera had been sold to someone else. I later received an email (from my original inquiry) from the seller telling me it was still available, but they had problems sending it to me and it is "still available" and did I want it? I told them, "sure, I would love to buy it, but only through Amazon." So they said that they would get an invoice going and sending me the camera. I was then told that they had sent the camera and wanted to know why I had not sent the money. OK, lots of red flags, so I contacted Amazon and told them the situation. They said that the person would not have access to my credit card (Amazon handles that part), so I was safe. I was asked to file a report and their investigative team would check it out. Since then, I have received a bogus Amazon invoice. The font for the order number is different than the rest of the document. They only wanted money from a "MoneyGram Money Transfer," and they wanted their money NOW since the camera was already in the mail. Elisabeth Williams, the person whose name is on all the emails, show an address for her (at the bottom of the invoice) in Italy. The invoice also says it was shipped "2nd Day Shipping." Well, today is the fifth day since the invoice date (Oct. 30) and guess what, no camera.
I have to say, I wish Amazon was more careful about their Marketplace clients, but the good news is, the Marketplace clients NEVER see your credit card number unless you send it directly to them. Thank goodness for the "A-Z protection."
PS - I looked up Screentek and they are a real company based out of Texas. They ONLY sell computer screens. So don't let that throw you off their products. And as to the email address of Elisabeth Williams, it was to "screentek@live.com," whereas the Screentek place is just "sales@screentek.com (no "live").
Good luck and beware!
Mark S. Cox answered on November 3, 2009

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The seller I contacted said the exact same thing so I'm assuming same person. Then he tried to get me to wire him money in Italy, telling me that's how Amazon "International" Marketplace works. I got an email supposedly from Amazon with instructions. But I never placed order on site. Called Amazon customer service and they said they wouldn't ask me to transfer money. Beware of these "too good to be true" used 7Ds.
R. Olson answered on October 23, 2009

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I contacted one of the vendors, screentek, or screentech, while the camera was listed. Then it was gone, but the seller has continued to contact me, it appears to be through Amazon, they want to know what they can do to prove to me they are legit. I asked them why they were selling a just released camera for such a low price and why was it not on Amazon. I also told them that if they would post it on Amazon again I would buy because I would be protected. I have not heard from them again - yet. Also screentek still sells items on Amazon. I was originally told by the people that all I had to do was agree to purchase the camera and that Amazon would send me a payment option. This is obviously a scam - it just bothers me that this company sells other items on Amazon. I have kept the rhetoric going with these people just to see how far they will go.
Mark C. Francis answered on October 31, 2009

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I don't usually buy things through amazon if it's a new seller(100+ stars for REALLY expensive items). A lot of people are in need of money now and they will do whatever to scam you for you money. If you spend $1000 and get scammed, and you still want to get Canon 7D, then you will end up paying $2700 - not worth the effort, time, and money. One rule for sure, never use MONEY GRAM. If you mail the payment using money gram, and then discover it is a fraud, MONEY GRAM will not do anything since it is a completed transaction.
max power answered on November 10, 2009

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I contacted one of the seller and here is what he said "...new (it's an ex demo therefore it has hardly been used and is as good as new it just had to be listed as 'used' as the box has been opened), sealed, comes with 12 months Canon warranty..."

Very tempting, but, would like hear from anyone who actually bought these "used 7d" in Amazon. Thanks.
Joe C. answered on October 20, 2009

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There's a waiting list for the 7D. This camera is so hot that some 3rd party Amazon sellers are even pricing it $200 above list. Now Adorama sells refurbed Canon 50Ds (some of which are lightly used demos) which are not as hot at the moment as the 7D and are only offering a $70 or 7% discount over the brand new price for the 50D. So why would somone with a demo 7D camera that everyone wants be offering a hefty 40% discount when they could probably get full MSRP from someone who didn'd want to wait for a brand spanking new sealed unit?
Technology Guy answered on October 22, 2009
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