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Value-Added Public Relations: The Secret Weapon of Integrated Marketing 1st Edition

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ISBN-13: 978-0844234120
ISBN-10: 0844234125
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

From Wonderbra to McDonalds, from Harley Davidson to Viagra, today's world leading companies and brands are using public relations to add power and persuasion to all of their marketing messages. Information, rather than salesmanship, builds credibility with sophisticated and skeptical consumers, and public relations, long viewed as the most trustworthy source of information about products and services and the companies that produce or provide them, can effectively reach targets where other marketing communication tools fall short.

In Value-Added Public Relations, Thomas L. Harris, the industry leading expert in marketing public relations (MPR), examines how and why public relations plays a critical role in integrated marketing and explains the many ways PR can add value to an IMC program. Harris analyzes the relationship between product and corporate brand building and through dozens of case histories and examples, shows how some of the nation's most successful marketers have used PR techniques to enhance all of their marketing messages. The book also features a comprehensive guide to writing an integrated marketing communications plan including writing a situation analysis, setting objectives, developing a strategy, devising tactics and then measuring results. Detailed descriptions of more than 50 effective PR tactics involving all media, including new technologies, are included, as well. (Danielle Egan-Miller, Editor, Business Books).

From the Back Cover

Marketers who inform their customers gain credibility for all of their communications messages. That's why public relations is the secret weapon of integrated marketing communications. Today's sophisticated and skeptical consumers know when they are being informed and when they are being "sold to." PR closes the marketing credibility gap because it is the one marketing communications tool devoted to providing information, not salesmanship. It makes every other marketing effort more effective.

Value-Added Public Relations is a groundbreaking book because it examines the many ways that public relations adds value to integrated marketing. In two sections Thomas L. Harris, a leader in marketing public relations, analyzes the relationship between product brand building and corporate brand building. Using dozens of case histories, Harris shows how some of the nation's most successful marketers have used public relations techniques to give added power and persuasion to all of their messages.

Part I includes twenty chapters devoted to the ways in which public relations adds value to IMC programs, followed by a list of "Lessons Learned." Part II provides a comprehensive guide to writing an integrated marketing communications plan. Chapters detail a five-step plan for writing a situation analysis, setting objectives, developing a strategy, devising tactics, and measuring results. Detailed descriptions of more than fifty tactics involving all media--from mass media to newer technologies that enable marketers to communicate directly with consumers--are featured. Most important, the book shows that the results and value of marketing public relations are measurable and critical to the success of integrated marketing programs.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1 edition (December 11, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0844234125
  • ISBN-13: 978-0844234120
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 0.7 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,499,556 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 30, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Value-Added Public Relations offers readers an overview of MPR (Marketing Public Relations-a term coined by the author) and the ways it can be used to increase the success of an integrated marketing campaign. As a professor of Integrated Marketing at the Medill School of Journalism and a leader in the public relations industry, Thomas L. Harris lends credibility to the importance of marketing public relations as a component of integrated marketing.
The beginning chapters set the stage by defining Integrated Marekting Communications (IMC), its components and the acceptance it has achieved as the modern approach to brand marketing. Also explored is the pivotal role of public relations as the credible source of information. As Harris explains, consumers today are more aware and know when they are being "sold" on something. However, when messages are delivered through a third party (i.e. the media) they are seen as more credible, and what's more, they can actually transfer that credibility to related advertising and promotion messages.
The subsequent chapters are made up of case studies-- real-life examples of the many ways that MPR completes the IMC picture and often times even leads the strategy. Examples are provided to illustrate positioning, revitalizing a brand, creating brand/product news, leveraging sponsorships and target marketing. At the end of each case study, Harris includes "Lessons Learned" - approximately 10-12 phrases intended to sum up each integrated campaign. While many of these lessons pointed out innovative tactics and key insights, some of the lessons seemed more obvious and contrived.
In the book's second section, Harris describes the five components needed to formulate a successful MPR program.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Tracey M. Boudine on March 27, 2003
Format: Paperback
I just can't figure out who this book is written for. It was highly disappointing - instead of finding fresh thoughtful new insights and innovative suggestions for how to build on what's already tried and true and been done to death in Marketing PR from an industry "thought leader", or so Mr. Harris positions himself, I found tired old industry award case study submission retreads GALORE (fyi - these case studies are submitted by PR agencies and spun like no one else can spin 'em to advantage so they can win the award to get new clients). What that means to the reader is the facts presented in these "case studies" are highly slanted, and for starters, give no "fair and balanced" counsel in terms of explaining reality (the very same one we have to market in every day), such as, OVER HYPING with PR isn't any better than blowing your wad on ineffective national TV commercials that don't cut the marketing mustard anymore. Essentially, the case studies are PR themselves.<...Regardless of the date this book was published (1998), doing what worked yesterday was dated as soon as the campaign was implemented, which was long before Mr. Harris repackaged these case studies for a book publisher (no wonder self-publishers are flourishing).
MY KEY LEARNING TO YOU: If your strategy is to focus on how "they did it yesterday" and what worked yesterday, this book is for you. However, if you're a little more forward-thinking, concerned about constantly improving to stay ahead of the competition, and prefer seeking inspiration for creative new strategies, ways of thinking, and of identifying connections between seemingly unrelated concepts to get your marketing in high gear, do some real work: start digging for inspiration, it's everywhere, unlike what's in this book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "kaia_espina" on March 23, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book should have been required reading in my PR class! Not only does it have comprehensive case studies of PR programs with all sorts of objectives (launching a new product, making old products look hip, etc.), it has a story for every PR tool I learned about in class. There is also a second part that shows how to plan a Marketing-PR program.
What I really like about this book is how it is so full of ideas. They are excellent mental triggers. I can open the book to almost any page, read about one company's PR program or tactic, and suddenly be filled with all sorts of ideas related to whatever I'm working on.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 20, 2002
Format: Paperback
Value-Added Public Relations argues that public relations are key to any successful marketing campaign. The book predominantly rests its premise on the belief that public relations adds credibility, and, thus, "value" to the marketing campaign. While I know plenty of marketing executives are unhappy about admitting it, I'm not sure I would call it a secret weapon.
The book is loaded with several case history examples. While it's well-written, overall, it fails to convey its message while taking into account the Internet. For that, I suggest Michael Levine's Guerrilla PR: Wired, which accepts the Internet's uses in a public relations and marketing campaign.
Overall, Value-Added Public Relations is a strong, if outdated, piece of work. While its suggestions are still useful, and it is a thorough piece of work, it would be worth considering to wait and see if an updated edition is released.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By just a girl on December 4, 2002
Format: Paperback
The book was just okay. Kotler's business industry and journal writings are much more insightful and interesting. Too basic for marketing practicioners.
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