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Value Leadership: The 7 Principles that Drive Corporate Value in Any Economy Paperback – October 3, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-0787966041 ISBN-10: 0787966045 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (October 3, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0787966045
  • ISBN-13: 978-0787966041
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,283,434 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

There is at least one truth in business: once a year, a consultant will draw a new road map to success. Now it's the turn of Cohan (The Technology Leaders [1997]), who has developed a formula called Value Leadership, based on seven humane principles from treating people with respect to giving to the community. Eight companies meeting these criteria are used as examples, with specific deeds singled out: Goldman Sachs for its insistence on the importance of teamwork, starting with pre-MBA recruitment; Microsoft, for its struggle to control the spread of AIDS in Botswana (in tandem with Merck); and 3M, for devoting 15 percent to research and development. In arguing that all corporate good deeds and values are rewarded, Cohan links his research to financial performance. Who says common sense doesn't pay? Barbara Jacobs
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

"Value Leadership is unusually well-constructed and perceptive, and its precepts seem eminently sensible for companies aiming for long-term." (Financial Executive)

More About the Author

Peter S. Cohan is a management consultant, venture capitalist, teacher, author and blogger. Prior to starting his management consulting and venture capital firm in 1994, he worked for Monitor Company, a strategy consulting firm co-founded by HBS Professor, Michael Porter and as an internal consultant in the banking and insurance industries. His firm has completed over 150 consulting projects for companies and govenments. He has invested in six private companies, three of which were sold for a total of $2 billion. He teaches business strategy to undergraduate and MBA students at Babson College; has authored 11 books; and writes the "Startup Economy" column for Forbes and the "Hungry Start-up" column for Inc. He earned an MBA from Wharton, did graduate work in Computer Science at MIT, and holds a BS in Electrical Engineering from Swarthmore College.

Customer Reviews

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It works well for active business managers and for investors.
Bill Roiter
As Cohan notes, value emerges from how well a company manages relationships with its customers, employees and communities.
Jacob C. Wesner
In Value Leadership, Peter Cohan makes the link between values-based leadership and superior economic performance.
William T. Redgate

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bill Roiter on December 21, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It has been my experience that most business leaders are smart, thoughtful, competent and ethical people. I have also met those who `live and die by the numbers' or conversely see their major responsibility as building a `culture where the business can thrive'. Both sides of this leadership spectrum have great value but when a leader chooses to focus on one side it is at the expense of the other.
Peter Cohan, in his book Value Leadership, brings together the numbers people and the culture people with a rationale and clear treatise. He then offers an effective tool to measure the results of this balanced and effective leadership stance. He takes the traditional business analyst's quantitative factors (market share, revenues and profit, balance sheet strength and more) and combines them with critical qualitative factors (quality of communications, employee satisfaction, customer service and more) to create a numeric score which can be used to assess current business functioning and to plan for strategic and tactical improvements. This measure alone is a great tool for business leaders and their managers, but it is what is measured that defines this books common sense standard. Mr. Cohan has created a way for business leaders to understand and measure their business' value. For anyone who has bought, sold or merged a business, or who invests in stocks, knows that the most elusive question is "what is the value of this business?" Mr. Cohan's "Value Quotient" is the most complete answer to the value question that I have seen. It works well for active business managers and for investors.
It is my belief that "value' will emerge over the next ten years as the most important factor in determining a business leader's success.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tania Yannas on December 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
Often, CEOs feel their executives do not share the same understanding of the critical drivers of their business's performance. Cohan's book is a useful tool for getting a management team "on the same page" and enabling them to clearly define the key levers that contribute to their business's success.
Cohan's framework makes it easy for managers in even the most complex companies to identify where their weaknesses are and address them. The book lays out a detailed, step-by-step guide that walks managers though all the activities and tactics that need to be considered in order to noticeably impact their company's bottom line. As a former general manager in a software company, I feel that sections of this book, such as "experimenting frugally," can really inspire a company to be more creative in identifying profitable paths to growth which it might not otherwise consider.
The book is invaluable as it enables managers to rise beyond the daily responsibilities of their jobs to identify levers that can have a truly significant impact on their companies.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I frequently read several books on the same general subject at the same time and did so again recently, reading this book as well as Lee Bolman and Terrence Deal's The Wizard and the Warrior and Wally Adamchik's No Yelling.

Here is the core concept in Peter Cohan's book: "Value leadership focuses on the essence of what makes American capitalism work, the persistent struggle to create ever higher levels of value for a company's stakeholders, in order to inspire the executives to reemerge from postboom economic gloom." Cohan identifies and then discusses with rigor and eloquence what he views as "The Seven Principles of Value Leadership": value human relationships, foster teamwork, experiment frugally, fulfill your commitments, fight complacency, win through multiple means, and give to your community.

He identifies five qualitative factors and six quantitative factors of "Value Leaders" and examines several companies that exemplify the concept and principles. They include Goldman Sachs, Johnson & Johnson, J.M. Smucker, MBNA, Microsoft, Southwest Airlines, Synopsys, and Wal-Mart. Agreeing that "what you cannot measure, you cannot manage," Cohan offers a way to quantify and manage "the amorphous topic of values": what he calls the Value Quotient (VQ) "which is predicated on a set of four or five activities that companies can perform within each of the seven Value Leadership principles."

It is important to note that although all of the exemplary companies are large, the same principles are directly relevant- and can be of substantial benefit - to all organizations, regardless of size or nature. Moreover, the VQ of a given company - based on four levels of analysis: concept, principles, activities, and tactics -- is determined by the VQ of those within it.
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Format: Paperback
Trust between leaders and their people has eroded steadily from the days of Watergate to Enron. Questionable accounting, fraudulent disclosures and excessive executive pay are symptoms of the problem, while glossy codes of ethics booklets and more stringent corporate governance regulations are mere bandages. What's needed is a seismic shift in executive attitude. Leaders need to embrace core values in their practice of management and hold themselves up to higher standards.
In Value Leadership, Peter Cohan makes the link between values-based leadership and superior economic performance. Cohan's pedigree as a strategic thinker includes tenure with James A. Champy, author of Reengineering the Corporation, and Michael E. Porter, author of Competitive Advantage.
Value Leadership is one of the best books on leadership I have ever read because it addresses all stakeholders -- from employees and customers to board members and investors. His seven principles of value leadership are guideposts to good management, and his "Value Quotient" provides a pragmatic framework for leaders who want to achieve that goal. If I were
running a corporation today, I would adopt his philosophy and process.
-- William T. Redgate, Founder and Executive Director, The Center for
Values-Based Leadership, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, Conn.,
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