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Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 54 customer reviews

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Length: 224 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Karen Martin is president of The Karen Martin Group, Inc., a firm that specializes in business performance improvement and Lean management practices. She's also the author of the Shingo Research Award–winning The Outstanding Organization, an instructor in the University of California, San Diego's Lean Enterprise program, and an industry advisor to the University of San Diego's Industrial and Systems Engineering program.

Mike Osterling provides support and leadership to organizations on their Lean transformation journey. Prior to consulting, Mike played a key internal role in Schneider Electric's Lean transformation during the 1990s. He is the cofounder of San Diego State University's Lean Enterprise program and continues to teach at SDSU and other universities.


Product Details

  • File Size: 11504 KB
  • Print Length: 224 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education; 1 edition (October 25, 2013)
  • Publication Date: October 25, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00EHIEJLM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #41,746 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Back in the late 1990′s the book “Learning to See” revolutionized my professional life. With lightening clarity I understood what lean flow was about, how I could learn to see the flow, and then make the flow better through kaizen. Working with Bruce Baggaley, (and help from numerous generous people) we set about “Learning to Count” by radically simplifying manufacturing cost accounting around value streams. These were exciting and creative times.

Now 13 or 14 years later, value stream mapping is everywhere. Everyone talks about value stream mapping. Almost every company I visit shows me their maps. This method has become a standard “lean tool”. Value stream mapping is a great success But …..

When you look a little closer you find this success is not so good as you think. There are many companies that have value stream maps on the wall that have no valid data. It’s common to be shown a current state map with no future state. Or you find a value stream map that addresses just a small part of the flow – totally missing the point. Other times I find beautiful looking diagrams created by powerful MapO’Matic software, but the maps are hidden inside computer systems and not really used for anything; and life goes on without any real vision for flow.

Like most good things, value stream mapping has been watered down and rendered impotent.

Karen Martin and Mike Osterling have written an excellent book that shows you step-by-step how to do value stream mapping and do it right. In their short and readable *”Value Stream Mapping”* book Martin and Osterling have laid out the authentic way to map value streams.

The book starts with defining what value streams are and why we need to map them.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In Learning to See by Shook and Rother, I learned how to illustrate a manufacturing process or value stream to illuminate the waste in that process. Keyte and Locher helped me refine the tool and apply it to non-manufacturing environments in The Complete Lean Enterprise: Value Stream Mapping for Administrative and Office Processes. Armed with these basics, I've led many mapping events, and being honest, some were successful while others were not.

Value Stream Mapping by Karen Martin & Mike Osterling is the missing piece that will help me go from how-to-map to how-to-be-more-successful in helping with the continuous improvement efforts in my organization. Learning how to have conversations with upper management, using value stream maps as the vehicle for strategic talks, was an aha moment for me and something I hadn't found in other books.

I would recommend this book to all change-agents, and all mappers (beginners and experienced). For those organizations that have the wall-decorating, unused value stream maps gathering dust, this book will help put the value-add back in value stream mapping.
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Format: Hardcover
How does Value Stream Mapping by Karen Martin & Mike Osterling joins the ranks of the best books on mapping and transforming value streams (material and information flow processes across the enterprise). The book differs from others in that it does not focus on the mechanics of value stream mapping itself. Instead the emphasis is on physical, social and logistical preparation around mapping a value stream. For the expert in value stream mapping, this book provides useful advice on how to embed VSM within the management of an overall change effort. For an experienced change leader without background in VSM, this book provides a good overview of its what and why. For the leader who is new to the above, the book provides guideposts for empowering the rest of the organization to take a stab at value stream mapping.

The six examples of current and future state value stream maps included in the Appendices, drawn from the authors' real experience in across business environments as various as Outpatient Imaging Services, Purchasing, Repair Services, Shelving Systems and Software Development, are a valuable addition to the literature.

Much of the "how" in this book surrounds activities peripheral but important to the mapping itself, such as setting the stage, laying the groundwork, defining the charter, forming the team, "socializing" or communicating the charter, and similarly organizing to implement the transformation plan after mapping. For the actual mapping activity itself, useful explanation is provided on conducting value stream walks, filling out data boxes and asking probing questions about the current and future state.

This book will turn many more people on to the power of value stream mapping and give people the courage and confidence to know that there is a way through the confusion and waste of everyday processes.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Karen and Mike clearly explains the value of mapping the process of any type of business. Many business people have an incomplete understanding of a vsm and treats it as a tool that is used once in a while with minimum results. This book explains how to utilize the vsm not just as a tool but as a way to manage business.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I think this is a very good book for those who are doing the transition from manufacturing to office/transactional processes. The author describes the VSM in a clear and structure way, takes you step by step with good keep of detail without overwhelming you with unnecessary information.
One of the points I found interesting, it's her approach and preference for narrow VSM's. Many of us are often tempted to to map wider processes and end up with a lot of "if" situations and a VSM too complex to make any ground breaking desicion, resulting in a mediocre VSM and a disappointed team.
I did find this book as worth reading and a must read book for any lean practitioner. Good enough for me to buy other books from the same author.
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