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Vampire Zero: A Gruesome Vampire Tale Paperback – October 14, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Broadway Books (October 14, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307381722
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307381729
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.7 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,152,345 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

DAVID WELLINGTON is the author of 13 Bullets, 99 Coffins, and the Monster Island trilogy.

More About the Author

David Wellington was born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He attended Syracuse University and received an MFA in creative writing from Penn State.

In 2004 he began serializing his novel Monster Island online. The book rapidly gained a following, and was acquired for print publication by Thunder's Mouth Press.

Since then, Wellington has published more than 15 novels, and has been featured in The New York Times, Boing Boing and the Los Angeles Times.

You can find him online at davidwellington.net.

Customer Reviews

I hope there's more of Laura Caxton to come!
C. Piazza
The prose is taut and engrossing and as ever, Wellington keeps it fresh with tight plotting and excellent pacing.
Bob Fingerman
I recommend this to any horror fans or fans of Wellington's work.
Disciple of Poseidon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Kaufmann on December 21, 2008
Format: Paperback
Vampire Zero, the third installment in Wellington's Laura Caxton series of novels, is, I think, the best of the series so far. While the first two, 13 Bullets and 99 Coffins, offered plenty of action and good old-fashioned vampire chewiness, this one, in my opinion, has the most compelling plot. I think it's also the tightest of the three.

Caxton has been promoted from State Trooper to Deputy U.S. Marshall and put in charge of the vampire-hunting task force based in Pennsylvania. Luckily, after the events of 99 Coffins, there are only two vampires left in the world. One is so old and decrepit she can't even leave her coffin. The other is a man who was once Caxton's mentor, the man who taught her everything she knows about fighting vampires. It's not just that he's a vampire now that's worrisome, nor the fact that he can anticipate all of Caxton's moves because he taught them to her himself, but rather the fact that he's a vampire zero, intent on spreading the curse and turning others into his kind. In particular, the members of his family. And that's what makes this the best of the series, to me at least. The personal element of the ticking clock plotline elevates this one to the status of a damn fine, and damn fast, read.

The Laura Caxton series gets better and better with each book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Shawn Smith on January 12, 2010
Format: Paperback
Two kinds of vampires have emerged from modern media. One sort is a romantic, misunderstood creature who is beloved by a troubled, isolated heroine. The other is a terrifying, (literally) bloodthirsty monster which preys on humankind. At one end of the spectrum, Edward Cullen sparkles and smolders in the hearts of adolescent girls.

David Wellington's vampires are not Edward Cullen. They are, in fact, at the far end of the spectrum, past Stoker's Dracula and Whedon's Buffy. These vampires are vicious, inhuman and utterly without remorse. Wellington's vampires quickly lose what connection they once had to humanity, and when not feeding on us, find slowly torturing us quite amusing.

This book is the third in David Wellington's Vampire Tales, and is the most terrifying and suspenseful of the series so far. Laura Caxton is a state trooper who was inadvertently cast as a vampire hunter just over a year ago, when Jameson Arkeley recruited her. Arkeley was a federal agent who, over 20 years, made it his personal crusade (obsession?) to obliterate the last shark-toothed, rotting, throat-ripping vampire in existence.

Noone knows vampires like Arkeley. During his career hunting them down, he learned every trick in their book and every strategy for catching them and killing them. Arkeley taught Caxton everything she knows about killing vampires--which is unfortunate, because now he is one.

Jameson Arkeley is the smartest, strongest, most vicious vampire Caxton has ever faced, and now she faces him alone.

This book kept me on my toes, defying my most confident (and usually correct) predictions as to where the story would go.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By James M. Hiner Jr. on January 5, 2010
Format: Paperback
Let me start out by giving my personal rating of this well written trilogy.

1. 13 bullets ... Very good.
2. 99 Coffins ... Excellent.
3. Vampire Zero.. Tremendous

It isn't often that I can find a trilogy that progressively gets better.
David Wellington nailed it when he penned these 3.

Very, very good work David, thank you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kindle Customer on June 6, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I adored this book until the ending. I started reading it and simply could not put it down. It's got great characters, good writing, excellent dialogue and plot. It's not exactly realistic at all times, but what vampire book is?

But the ending fell short. I feel like I was whisked into this whirlwind story only to be dropped. I think because it's a series. Most series make me excited for the next book though, and this one simply left me wary. It's also not that gruesome.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Richard B. Nguyen on November 28, 2008
Format: Paperback
In my opinion the story has never been as exciting and the action never as gripping as the first act of his first book - 13 Bullets.THAT was a TRULY gruesome vampire tale.

That being said Vampire Zero is still worth the read if only to prepare for the inevitable next chapter.. no spoiler intended.
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By Paul A. Crutcher on January 10, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
*Zero* fails. Probably the worst book in the series, unfortunately. Malvern is infinitely clever, and through four books it's clear just how powerful she is. The greatest disappointment, of course, and one I anticipated, is that Arkley is a cool, smart vampire, but that in his vampire state he is no longer the badass copper I loved from the moment I opened *13 Bullets.* Here, we have Arlkey running around Pennsylvania, trying to reconcile guilt from his human life by offering those he should have loved the curse and eternal life. *Zero* is something about loneliness, of course, about social exclusion, but it's infinitely weak compared to the self-reflection of other vampire tales (partly because we're hearing again from the crusader, not the vampire).

If characterization and logic are two major problems with this book within the series, telegraphed linearity and dumbly complex action are major flaws of *Zero* as a satisfying (autonomous) book. That the son-brother was the Arkley impersonator in the blue suit, for instance, that the daughter-sister had already taken the curse and was a vampire (we all know by now they can be perfectly still and don't breathe), that Fetlock was constantly spying on Caxton and that the arrangement would bite the latter, that Arkley-the-vampire was going to plummet to his death in the coal fires---it all made for a book that offered zero surprises, zero innovation, full linearity.

That said, the last thing I want to write about is Wellington's construction of the vampire. Decisively the thing that sets Wellington apart in scifi-fantasy-action is his reconfiguration of the classic aristocrat into the brutal monster. But it doesn't always work, it doesn't always make sense.
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