Qty:1

Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $1.00
Learn More
Sell It Now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Vanishing Waves (2-Disc DVD)
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Vanishing Waves (2-Disc DVD)


List Price: $29.95
Price: $18.86 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $11.09 (37%)
Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
11 new from $16.22 1 used from $19.31
Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
2-Disc Version
$18.86
$16.22 $19.31

Deal of the Week: Save up to 68% on Select Movies and TV
This week only save on Universal Classic Monsters: Complete 30-Film Collection , Eureka: The Complete Series , and Roswell: The Complete Series .


Frequently Bought Together

Vanishing Waves (2-Disc DVD) + Clip (Klip) + Young & Wild
Price for all three: $54.27

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product Details

  • Actors: Marius Jampolskis
  • Directors: Kristina Buozyte
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: Finnish
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Kino Lorber films
  • DVD Release Date: July 23, 2013
  • Run Time: 124 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00C8CQ5S4
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #64,979 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Lukas (Marius Jampolskis) is assisting a scientific research team by functioning as a patient in a series of heavily monitored (and medicated) sensory deprivation experiments wherein he is attempting to make some form of contact with the subject, Aurora (Jurga Jutaite), a young woman who has been locked in a comatose state for some time. Doctors initially hope for just a vague reaffirmation of consciousness, but the experiment takes an unexpected twist when Lukas and Aurora actually develop a strong psychic link in their mutually altered forms of consciousness...and their link quickly evolves into a romantic, sexually charged relationship. As Lukas hides this data from his researchers, he and Aurora meet secretly and passionately in a series of surreal dreamscapes created by their collective minds, but their union is tragically doomed to collapse around them. Exploring the tantalizing possibilities of forming a true, all-encompassing bond with one s lover, Vanishing Waves is hypnotic, erotic, wholly engrossing, and wildly thought-provoking cinema that transcends any perceived limitations of the science fiction genre, becoming one of the year s most provocative films in the process.

Customer Reviews

I guess this is just too damn Avant Garde for me,..
Tom Sanders
Despite the success, Lukas is not honest with the researchers, because he lies to them about the results, telling them that he wasn't getting any connection at all.
Carlos E. Velasquez
Sure, there were a few nice scenes here and there, but nothing to make up for the lack of proper plot, science, characterization, etc.
Tue Sorensen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By E. Lee Zimmerman on July 16, 2013
Format: DVD
How we know what we know has always been an area of exploration that finds small audience interest in the art-house film scene. Pictures like 2004's ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND kinda/sorta tinkered with memory and memory loss, but I was largely turned off my its endless character quirks and curiously unaligned narrative focus. 1990's TOTAL RECALL with Arnold Schwarzenegger took the idea of implanting memories and stuck in it a big budget picture that probably worked best though it really glossed over the more cerebral elements in favor of box office success. Heading back into the 80's, there were some features more commercial in nature - 1983's BRAINSTORM and 1984's DREAMSCAPE - but they too were somewhat forgettable in that they tried to capitalize more on a capitalist or exploitative perspective too all of it.

For my tastes, VANISHING WAVES resembles in many ways 2013's UPSTREAM COLOR, though it comes at similar subject matter from an entirely different point-of-view: it injects our narrator into another person's head, putting him up close and personal in a way that inevitably threatens both their sanity.

(NOTE: The following review will contain minor spoilers necessary solely for the discussion of plot and character. If you're the kind of reader who prefers a review entirely spoiler-free, then I'd encourage you to skip down to the last three paragraphs for my final assessment. If, however, you're accepting of a few modest hints at `things to come,' then read on ...)

Lukas (played by Marius Jampolskis) is a neuroscience researcher who agrees to have his mind linked to that of a comatose auto-accident survivor named Aurora (a weirdly incandescent Jurga Jutaite).
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Carlos E. Velasquez on September 30, 2013
Format: DVD
Can we communicate with the dead? Perhaps since famous magician Houdini's death - probably the most famous case -, that is a question that has been craving for an answer, and not a good one, as far as I know, has been provided. Perhaps we can be more successful trying to establish contact with semi-death persons (comatose, that is). That is precisely the story behind the captivating, intriguing, and at times erotic (depending on what arouses you) "Vanishing Waves."

Lukas (Marius Jamploskis) is a young researcher who lives a steady and apparent tranquil life with his girlfriend. However, their calm days would be end soon, as Lukas volunteers to an experiment in the laboratory where he works. The senior scientists are trying to connect the minds - for a lack of a better word - of a normal, healthy person (Lukas), with that of a comatose one. In this case, they chose Aurora (Jurga Jutaite), a young, beautiful lady, who is in a comatose state. The experiment goes well, and Lukas gets some kind of connection with Aurora, as he is able to go into her thoughts. Despite the success, Lukas is not honest with the researchers, because he lies to them about the results, telling them that he wasn't getting any connection at all. As it happens, the communication gets improving, to the point of reaching erotic encounters (plenty nudity, of course). As expected, Lukas gets more motivated, to the point of obsession, and his involvement cause unexpected results.

"Vanishing Waves" is original and heavy. It is a story of obsession told with intelligence, with great cinematography by Feliksas Abrukauskas, and able direction by Kristina Buozyte. The movie won awards at Fantastic Fest and other European film competitions.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The Movie Guy on October 5, 2013
Format: DVD
Lukas (Marius Jampolskis) becomes part of an altered state experiment by synchronizing his brain waves with a woman in a coma (Jurga Jutaite). They meet and live in a surreal dream world that is slightly bizarre and is sexual. Lukas becomes attached to the girl and has difficulty readjusting to the real world.

This is an indie art film. I found the subject matter interesting, but not always entertaining. 3 1/2 stars

Parental Guide: Sex and Nudity
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: DVD
Start with three stars, and deduct one or two if you sometimes or often complain a movie is "slow." (By the standards of foreign arthouse flicks, this isn't all that slow, so if you had no problem with The Tree of Life, you're golden. If, OTOH, you're down to one star, you may well want to skip this regardless of the following.)

Add a star if you like challenging sci-fi movies like Donnie Darko, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Prestige, and Primer. This one is actually easy to parse, provided you think along with it by asking yourself what might be possible in the film's sci-fi experiment (receiving information, via a wired connection, from a *comatose* patient), and then look for clues that confirm your suspicions. (See the end of the review for more.)

Add a star if you empathize with problematical characters and tend to cut them some slack if they behave badly, e.g., by sensing that were damaged by something in their past. In this case, our hero does not behave admirably, but it's ultimately clear that partaking in the experiment itself is damaging him, and making him increasingly obsessive. To the movie's credit, this is not telegraphed in the least.

IOW, this is a rare example of what might be called "Arthouse Sci-Fi." While not in a class with 2001: A Space Odyssey or Upstream Color, it's nevertheless terrific. The production design, cinematography and soundtrack are all stunning, the performances are excellent, and the story, while relatively thin compared to the aforementioned, is thought-provoking and moving.

Note that the trailer, near the end, gives away a key plot point, so you shouldn't watch more than half of it.

SPOILERISH TIP: Lukas has been connected to a woman who is in a coma and hence has no active brain function. What kind of information might such a person be sending him? Information that *already existed* in her brain ...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in