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Vegetarian Times Complete Cookbook Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (September 27, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0026217457
  • ISBN-13: 978-0026217453
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 8.3 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #815,292 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Since the mid-1970s, Vegetarian Times?where Moll was executive editor?has grown from a simple newsletter to a four-color magazine. This all-purpose, appealing collection of 750 recipes is drawn mainly from the magazine's pages and caters to the vegetarian spectrum, from complete vegetarians to those who eat eggs and cheese. Introductory chapters explain differences between ovo-lacto vegetarians, lacto vegetarians and vegans, and tout the animal-free diet as healthy (most recipes derive only 20 to 25 percent of their calories from fat) and environmentally sensible (feeding a meat-eater requires 3.25 acres a year; an ovo-lacto vegetarian needs half an acre). But the real question is whether a vegetarian meal can be as tasty as a meat-, fish-or poultry-based meal. The proof here is in the pudding (a Spiced Pumpkin Custard or Spiced Carrot Pudding) and in appetizers, soups, main courses, sandwiches and breakfast foods. Recipes range from standard meat-replacement dishes (Nutty Lentil Loaf) to the imaginative (Chile-Mole Popcorn; Spaghetti Squash Salad), with nods to ethnic cuisine (African Peanut Soup). Included are plentiful recipes using less common ingredients such as soy-based tempeh and seitan, derived from wheat. Menu suggestions are also listed.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Vegetarianism has gone mainstream, and so has Vegetarian Times, with a fast-rising circulation now close to 400,000. This hefty cookbook features more than 700 recipes. The 100-page introduction includes, not surprisingly, a strong sell for the vegetarian way, as well as sections on menu planning, ingredients, and techniques. The diversity of the recipes demonstrates the evolution of the vegetarian diet from the unappetizing millet stews of the 1960s. There are lots of beans and grains, along with soy-based dishes and what the authors refer to as "taste-alikes," such as tofu "egg salad," but the majority are much more sophisticated and inspired by a wide range of cuisines, from Snow Peas with Radish Cream to Green Coconut Curry; it's too bad so many have such long ingredients lists. Recommended for most collections.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

The recipes are creative and delicious.
Syb
And if you're just starting out, this is not the book for you, it will make you have an aversion to vegetarian foods.
"dunebee"
Now that I've checked what others have to say about the book, I know its not me.
Anonymous_me

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 28, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I must own 30 vegetarian cookbooks and this is the best one of them all. I often reccomend this cookbook to vegetarians and meat-eaters alike. I find that it is the best resource for everything from meal planning to fast meals to finding a recipe to use up some vegetable or another. I could not reccomend it any more highly. It has more than paid for itself.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By K. Schleick on May 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone who is just starting on a vegetarian way of life, and would not, in fact, recommend it to anyone unless you are an accomplished chef who can fix bad recipes. I have made a few recipes in each section - appetizers, soup, main course, etc. - and found the results to be complete disasters 80% of the time. Usually the food is underspiced, overcooked, or just a terrible mix of ingredients. The few recipes in this book that have worked, like the Couscous stuffed Squash, are marred by typos. A really awful cookbook considering its source and promise. While the introductions and other information are good, the recipes do not deliver.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Kerry Griffin on July 7, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I've just finished making the third recipe from this book, and once again it turned out yuck. Each has had the wrong amounts( the vegetable samosas had 3 times the ammount of filling for the wrappers), or neglects key instructions (such as don't let the pumpkin ravioli touch or they will stick together horribly). Once you spend alot of time, even if it magically turns out ok, the finished product is only so-so. Stick with the Moosewood books for beginner vegetarian cooking.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 8, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is the first vegetarian cookbook and resource I ever owned, and it is still tops. The recipes are varied and range from easy to interesting (but never difficult) and include complete nutritional information (something more cookbooks should do). A particular favorite with my family is the Mexican Lasagna. I have a shelf-full of vegetarian cookbooks, all good, yet this is the one I turn to most often, and recommend to anyone who wants a good vegetarian primer as well as a great cookbook.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By bcathey@safeplace.net on January 5, 1998
Format: Hardcover
An excellent primer and introduction to vegetarianism and vegetarian cooking. Recipes are all doable, with easily located ingredients (via local health food stores, if necessary). All recipes feature nutritional information and thorough instructions. Our family favorite; saffron risotto timbales on a roasted tomato sauce--very classy.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 13, 2004
Format: Hardcover
As long as you don't mistake this book for an introductory cookbook, this cookbook is not so bad as some are making it out to be. It's an introduction to vegetarian cooking, not an introduction to cooking. It's for proficient cooks who want to try vegetarian. A better title for this book might be The Yuppie Vegetarian Kitchen of the Nineties.
One point no one has mentioned yet makes this cookbook distinctive. Except for the one recipe I note below, the food presents very attractively. This is almost never true of other vegetarian cookbooks I have used. If you are a decent cook concerned with presentation (as you might be if you were taking food to a party, or having people to dinner), this may well be the book for you.
I will review each recipe I have tried to give you a feel for the book, so you can decide whether it may be for you.

I have made these recipes from the book, in this order.
- snow peas stuffed with radish creme (dairy)
- cucumbers stuffed with hummus (vegan)
- two rice salad (vegan)
- wild rice and apricot stuffing (vegan)
- raw cabbage dressed with balsamic vinegar (don't remember the title but it may have been something like Low Fat Slaw). (vegan)
I liked the first three of these five recipes, so the book made a good impression on me. Three out of five recipes that work in any cookbook is a decent batting average. Remember, there's no accounting for taste!
The snow peas with radish creme were very tasty: ground radishes in a cream cheese base, stuffed into blanched snow peas. You would have to like radishes, but the cream cheese tones the radishes down a bit. It's meant to be an appetizer or finger food for a party.
Read more ›
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By JK Oregon on August 14, 2001
Format: Hardcover
My wife and I wanted to explore vegetarian cooking. We wanted an intro cookbook that would not preach at us, not try to make us vegans, and not get into all sorts of explanations of minerals, vitamin supplements, and additives. Just a cookbook with answers to background questions about going meatless. After some searching, we found this is book and feel grateful to have discovered it.
It starts off by looking at issues like how to get enough protein in your diet, how to make sure you're still getting a balanced meal, and what can happen if you don't eat correctly. It then adds a history of vegetarianism (Who knew vegetarians were called Pythagoreans until the mid-19th century?)
Once these introductory chapters are done, the book launches in to the recipe section with careful and useful explanations about the different areas to explore. It's readable and definitely approachable even for non-cooks. Numerous recipes are highlighted full-color pictures of the dishes. In addition, each recipe shows the calories, protein, and fat composition of the dish.
This is as complete, friendly, and approachable introduction to vegetarianism as I have seen. Recommended.
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