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  • Verdi - La Traviata / Ciofi, Sacca, Hvorostovsky, Tufano, Martorana, Cordella, Porta, Maazel, La Fenice Opera
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Verdi - La Traviata / Ciofi, Sacca, Hvorostovsky, Tufano, Martorana, Cordella, Porta, Maazel, La Fenice Opera

15 customer reviews

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DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$35.00

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Patrizia Ciofi, Dmitri Hvorostovsky, Roberto Sacca, Eufemia Tufano, Salvatore Cordella
  • Format: Classical, Color, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: Italian (Dolby Digital 5.1), Italian (DTS 5.1), Italian (PCM Stereo)
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Alliance
  • DVD Release Date: October 18, 2005
  • Run Time: 146 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000B6N6FE
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #168,973 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Toni Bernhard on April 15, 2006
Mine seems to be a minority opinion here, but this production was a big disappointment. I was looking forward to Patrizia Ciofi as Violetta because she was thrilling in the recent Lyon Opera production of Lucie de Lammermoor. I was curious to see Roberto Sacca as Alfredo because I've only heard him as a sweet-voiced Mozart tenor (he does a great job of humanizing Don Ottavio in The Zurich Opera's 2001 Don Giovanni). And I expected great things from Dmitri Hvorostovsky who was so good as di Luna in Il Trovatore.

The first surprise was to see Violetta played as a common prostitute instead of the self-educated and refined courtesan, Marie Duplessis, on whom Verdi based the character. To help with this transformation, the director updates the setting to the 1970's, Violetta parading around in flimsy lingerie and Alfredo appearing to be some kind of photographer (paparazzi perhaps?). I can accept the director's choice to focus on Violetta's "bottom line" profession, but in Act I, Ciofi and Sacca play their characters as so self-absorbed that they are entirely unsympathetic. How can we believe Alfredo loves Violetta when, as he cries "mysterioso" in "Di quell' amor," he's throwing photographs at her ("head shots" in the trade) and then sings the rest of the duet with his camera in front of his face, snapping pictures? This duet seems like a complete failure to me.

Ciofi continues to disappoint in Act I. She oversings and overacts in her big set piece. I find it painful to watch. In Act II, Sacca's voice comes alive in "O mio rimorso," but why is the floor of the forest covered with U.S. dollars printed with Verdi's picture? I don't get it.
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23 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Archie (Ottawa Canada) on December 26, 2005
Admittedly there are some things to criticise about the underlying concept behind this production (I do not agree with Robert Carson's premise that Violetta was a prostitute. She was a courtesan, something far different)-- but surely that is part of the fun of seeing new productions. Fortunately the "stand and deliver" static productions are dying off, singers are now expected to be able to act as well as sing; and opera productions are moving in varied directions -- some more successfully than others. Carson has a basic premise and builds on it in a unified manner. The production is nowhere near as bad as Mr. Piper's somewhat over-the-top review would have one believe; and I hope that no one is put off by his review. The ballet which he calls a complete bust is an appropriate campy nightclub production; there is not all that much rolling around the floor; the lingerie is not all that revealing; etc etc. One should take the time to try to figure out what is happening and why. As I wrote above, it certainly makes viewing more fun.

The reason I started in this way is because I would hate people to be put off from buying this recording. The three leads are prime examples of actor/singers, and their performances really should be seen. Dmitry Hvorostovsky as Giorgio Germont gives a restrained but powerful performance which leaves us in no doubt that this is a man who is used to command, who is never questioned, who is always in control and believes himself always right --until the final act.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Z. Yang on November 12, 2005
Verified Purchase
This updated production of La Traviata, recorded live on Nov. 18, 2004 at the rebuilt Teatro La Fenice in Venice was the performance to reopen the opera season at the legendary theatre after its being destroyed by fire on the night of Jan. 29, 1996. It will stand in its own place among all the La Traviata's for its modern staging and refreshing perspectives. The fact that it used the original 1853 version that was world-premièred at La Fenice would make the performance more significant, only that you wouldn't want history to repeat itself in respect to the opening night of La Traviata at La Fenice on May 6, 1853, which was, in Verdi's own words, "a fiasco". Robert Carsen's ambitious production, boasting the glittery nightclub scenes and design of large symbolic dollar bills (oddly with Verdi's image in the center) covering and hovering the stage, would certainly be under such risk, but pulled off amazingly thanks to the wonderful cast that takes up the challenge rigorously. As Robert Carsen wrote in the liner notes for the DVD, "It is sometimes easy to forget that La Traviata is a story about a prostitute, albeit one at the top of her profession." That well explains the bold approach in this production where elements of sex and money are conveyed not as subtly as one usually expects - right from the beginning, during Verdi's beautiful overture, one is reminded of both.

Patrizia Ciofi portrayed a passionate, struggling, and emotional honest Violetta, who would stay in one's mind long after the play is over. Her Violetta is well sung and deeply touching. With just the right vitality and vanity, she makes the role more compelling than other Violetta's I've seen. Roberto Sacca's Alfredo is adequately sung, but suffered from shortage of charisma in his acting.
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