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Version Control with Git: Powerful tools and techniques for collaborative software development Paperback – June 14, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-0596520120 ISBN-10: 0596520123 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: Version Control With Git
  • Paperback: 330 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (June 14, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596520123
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596520120
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.9 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #681,346 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jon Loeliger is a freelance software engineer who contributes to Open Source projects such as Linux, U-Boot, and Git. He has given tutorial presentations on Git at many conferences including Linux World, and has written several papers on Git for Linux Magazine.

In prior lives, Jon has spent a number of years developing highly optimizing compilers, router protocols, Linux porting, and the occasional game. Jon holds degrees in Computer Science from Purdue University. In his spare time, he is a home winemaker.


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Customer Reviews

This book jumped into the weeds way too fast.
I Feel Fine
I have used git for quite a while and think it's a great tool that can do a lot for you.
Matt
In summary, I would recommend this book highly as an introduction and reference to Git.
Richard Morin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

91 of 97 people found the following review helpful By I Feel Fine on June 2, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book jumped into the weeds way too fast. Which is good and bad. The label "power user" is appealing and I see the merit in knowing internals. But not with source control. It's a tool. I want to be able to use it productively and quickly and not have to remember MORE THAN two dozen commands. I'm not afraid of branching or merging, but then again, I don't care how these branches and merges are represented as objects on the filesystem.

And that's the problem. This book starts with the assumption that you're interested in the details and will cherish an under-the-hood look. Actually, for me, I really don't care. The details are certain to change. I'm convinced I'll be throwing this book out in a few years because it's outdated. I wouldn't be surprised if Git's hyphenated low level command structure disappears in a few years making this book nearly unusable - these commands are more developer tools than user tools.

With all the negative stuff out of the way, the book does contain a lot of good information. It's easy to read. It hits on a few interesting ideas on managing git. I found no issue following along with the examples - all of them worked fine for me.
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45 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 27, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The author really knows his stuff. There's a lot of information on how git works. My problem is that I need to get work done. The book tells you how to create a git repository and add files to it. It doesn't do a good job explaining how to put a file back. That's the information I need.

I wish books like this would give you the basics first. Here's how you create a repository. Here's how you add files. Here's how you put a file back if you change or delete it.

That's my two cents.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Rohrbaugh on March 19, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've been using Git for my side projects for nearly a year now, based primarily on knowledge I scraped together through conference sessions, screen-casts and cheat sheets. This is how a lot of people seem to get started with Git, but at some point it becomes necessary to really understand how it's working and what some of the more advanced commands are for.

This book was exactly the right next step for me, moving me from stumbling around in Git to really understanding it. The author accomplishes this by taking the time to cover Git internals and to build on your knowledge as the book progresses. At first, I resisted all the plumbing explanations, since I doubt I'll be contributing to Git itself, but after a chapter or two it becomes obvious that understanding what Git is doing internally is pretty important to understanding how to interact with it. Additionally, the internals are always explained from a layman's perspective and never get so nuanced that they distract from the topic area being covered.

The book is organized so that you slowly build up knowledge of how Git works, with many topic areas sort of split into a basic and advanced chapter. This was a bit annoying at first, but since the more advanced topics require you to understand other aspects of the tool first, it's necessary. As an example, you need to understand diffs, branching and merges before you can worry about patches, and you need to understand branching and merging before you can worry about remotes.

The book also ends with a decent overview of how to use Git with SVN, which is still pretty important given that a lot of organizations will be relying on SVN for quite some time.
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33 of 40 people found the following review helpful By HugeStakkaBoFan VINE VOICE on September 9, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Out of the current crop of distributed version control systems, Git is by far my least favorite. Unfortunately for me, out of the current crop of distributed version control systems, Git is the only one that I don't have to spend an hour chasing bizarre, nonsensical uncaught Python exceptions every time I upgrade, so it's the one I've been stuck gravitating toward.

Luckily, just about anything I don't like about Git can be customized out of existence, but up until now, figuring out how to go about doing this the right way has always been something of a guessing game. This book starts you off on the right foot and gives you the best practices you'll need to adopt in order to not make a fool of yourself, which is really all you can ever hope for.

Highly recommended to anyone who needs or wants to work with Git, even if you already know what you're doing.
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24 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Richard Morin on July 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be very well and carefully written. As a technical writer and editor, I'm extremely picky about copy errors, language usage, etc. I was pleasantly surprised to find almost no problems of this sort.

I also found the book remarkably easy to understand. Given the complex and esoteric nature of the topic matter, this is quite an accomplishment! In summary, I would recommend this book highly as an introduction and reference to Git.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By E. Paulson on December 31, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is absolutely the best book on git available, and even if you've used git before you'll learn something from it.

The first five chapters are perfect, and do an amazing job of explaining what the heck git is doing.

If there's anything wrong with the book, it starts to show up in chapter 6, which is where new concepts are referenced many chapters before they're explained (for example, all the sudden remote tracking branches show up 5 chapters before they're actually explained). Sometime's there's just no way around this - it's tough to untie all of the knots of git.

Expect to read chapters 6 (commits) and chapter 9 (merges) twice - ideally after you've read the whole book and have actually used git to manage a project with branches.

There's plenty to tighten up for a second edition, but it still gets five stars.
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