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Viaticum


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Viaticum
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Audio CD, October 25, 2005
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 25, 2005)
  • Original Release Date: 2005
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: 215 Records
  • ASIN: B000B8QFE6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #361,562 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
56%
4 star
25%
3 star
19%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 16 customer reviews
Anyway, this is on the very short list of best music I've ever heard.
James B. Clasby
What makes the music even better is that they seem to bring a lot of elements of their own Scandinavian musical culture into jazz.
A.J.H. Woodcount
I recommend this CD and E.S.T. to anyone who is likes jazz piano with a little kick to it.
Kurt Harding

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A.J.H. Woodcount on November 18, 2005
Format: Audio CD
The Esbjorn Svensson Trio is (one of) the best piano-trio's in the world. They prove the statement that it's impossible for jazz to renew itself, without changing it into something completely different to be totally wrong. The trio has been together for a long time, and that you can hear: they really listen to each other.

They have to, because they tend to put so much space or silence in their music, that it would be very hard to play when they didn't.

A lot of jazzcombinations change their strength a lot, and not always in their advantage. At jazzfestivals you here a lot of theme-solo-solo-solo-boringdrumsolo-theme-jazz, and that's allright when the individuals are interesting enough, but a lot of times it's simply not good enough. Somtimes the reason of that is that the bands are so good that they can change their personal a lot, but it doesn't always do the music good. And this is one of the differences between E.S.T. and some other jazzbands you could hear live.

And then there's their tendency to use 'classical' or folkthemes in their music. E.S.T. does that right too: they're not trying anything but to make great music. They're not playing Bach on a banjo (wich is nice, but doesn't really get to you), but they just look (or listen!) for good themes as a base for their music. That's what they do best and that's what makes all of their albums since From Gagarin's Point Of View worth bying.

What makes the music even better is that they seem to bring a lot of elements of their own Scandinavian musical culture into jazz. Maybe that's the explanation of the feeling you get when you see them play live: they really feel what they're playing. And that makes it possible for the audience to feel it to.

E.S.T.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A.J.H. Woodcount on September 19, 2005
Format: Audio CD
The Esbjorn Svensson Trio is (one of) the best piano-trio's in the world. They prove the statement that it's impossible for jazz to renew itself, without changing it into something completely different to be totally wrong. The trio has been together for a long time, and that you can hear: they really listen to each other.
They have to, because they tend to put so much space or silence in their music, that it would be very hard to play when they didn't.
A lot of jazzcombinations change their strength a lot, and not always in their advantage. At jazzfestivals you here a lot of theme-solo-solo-solo-boringdrumsolo-theme-jazz, and that's allright when the individuals are interesting enough, but a lot of times it's simply not good enough. Somtimes the reason of that is that the bands are so good that they can change their personal a lot, but it doesn't always do the music good. And this is one of the differences between E.S.T. and some other jazzbands you could hear live.

And then there's their tendency to use 'classical' or folkthemes in their music. E.S.T. does that right too: they're not trying anything but to make great music. They're not playing Bach on a banjo (wich is nice, but doesn't really get to you), but they just look (or listen!) for good themes as a base for their music. That's what they do best and that's what makes all of their albums since From Gagarin's Point Of View worth bying.

What makes the music even better is that they seem to bring a lot of elements of their own Scandinavian musical culture into jazz. Maybe that's the explanation of the feeling you get when you see them play live: they really feel what they're playing. And that makes it possible for the audience to feel it to.

E.S.T.
Read more ›
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By jazzmusikeditor on December 2, 2006
Format: Audio CD
The Esbjörn Svensson Trio, or EST for short, are simply the hottest European jazz outfit in the world right now. Their brand of highly modernistic instrumental compositions have won plaudits from the likes of Pat Metheny and Jamie Cullum, while critical acclaim has been unrelenting over their 13-year history - auspiciously they became the very first European jazz outfit to grace the front cover of American jazz bible Downbeat.

While maintaining a credible and contemporary edge to their improvisation, the band manage to create instantly accessible and beautiful themes in their music and this is the key to their continued popularity both with audiences and critics alike.

'Viaticum' is set for a similar reception, it's an album that grabs you straight from the off but at the same time demands repeated listening to make sure you catch all the detail.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Karl W. Nehring on July 8, 2009
Format: Audio CD
Two of my favorite musical groups are Keith Jarrett's Standards Trio and Radiohead. In a sense, the Esbjörn Svensson Trio (E.S.T.) sounds like what Keith Jarrett's group would sound like if Jarrett, DeJohnette, and Peacock all suddenly became huge Radiohead fans, and maybe Jarrett had started hanging out and swapping riffs with Christopher O'Riley, the classical pianist (and host of NPR's From the Top) who has recorded a couple of remarkable albums of Radiohead transcriptions.

No, Viaticum does not feature any Radiohead transcriptions, nor are there any tortured vocals. But the feeling that comes across from the music produced by pianist Svensson, along with bandmates Dan Berglund on bass and Magnus Öström on bass, brings to mind some of the Radiohead sensibility and musical lyricism that O'Riley discovered and tapped into. Or, perhaps I am just nuts, and it would be best for all concerned if I could just figure out how to disappear completely...

E.S.T. plays tunes that are lyrical acoustic jazz sorts of compositions, but by adding a touch of electronica here and there, and a touch of rock energy, most notably in some of the work done by bassist Berglund, they achieve an emotional intensity that is extremely involving. At the time I picked up this CD, I was in the midst of dealing with the terminal illness of my mother-in-law. Listening to Viaticum over and over during that time was a source of both comfort and energy. This is music of density and substance; it is not meant for mere diversion. It is intense, involving, and melodic--sometimes familiar and comfortable, sometimes fragmentary and disquieting, but always musically and emotionally rewarding.

This is a recording that should appeal to a wide variety of music lovers. I recommend it without reservation.
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Esbjorn Svensson Trio
There are other European piano trios with a similar feel, although EST has its unique qualities. Check out Tord Gustavsen's trio, and the brilliant young piano trio, headed up by Marcin Wasilewski, which is Tomasz Stanko's band. Their album is called - "Trio". While you're at it, grab... Read More
Aug 5, 2006 by Bruce C. Moore |  See all 2 posts
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