Qty:1

Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $0.25
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Vicki (Fox Film Noir)
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Vicki (Fox Film Noir)


List Price: $14.98
Price: $9.30 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $5.68 (38%)
Only 12 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
22 new from $4.35 13 used from $3.68
Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$9.30
$4.35 $3.68


Frequently Bought Together

Vicki (Fox Film Noir) + Dangerous Crossing + Black Widow (Fox Film Noir)
Price for all three: $28.22

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product Details

  • Actors: Jeanne Crain, Jean Peters, Elliott Reid, Richard Boone, Max Showalter
  • Directors: Harry Horner
  • Writers: Dwight Taylor, Leo Townsend, Steve Fisher
  • Producers: Leonard Goldstein
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Black & White, Mono, Full Screen, NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox
  • DVD Release Date: August 29, 2006
  • Run Time: 85 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000FKO3VW
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #98,665 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Vicki (Fox Film Noir)" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Commentary by film historian Foster Hirsch
  • Poster art gallery
  • Behind-the-scenes gallery
  • Interactive pressbook gallery
  • Film noir trailers

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Three more film noir titles from the Fox vaults. Fourteen Hours features Grace Kelly's film debut. Vicki is a loose remake of I Wake Up Screaming. Those that have been collecting the series should continue to do so. Good catalog titles.

Amazon.com

The portrait under the opening credits conjures up memories of Laura, although this 1953 Fox noir quickly reveals its real roots: it's a remake of the studio's marvelous 1941 thriller I Wake Up Screaming, a movie sometimes tagged as the first true film noir. Once it gets underway, Vicki demonstrates how short it falls of its predecessors. A famous model (Jean Peters) is murdered, leading a weirdly obsessive detective (Richard Boone) to hound her press agent (Elliott Reid) about the case. The dead woman also had a sister (Jeanne Crain), who is so dull she makes you regret which sibling got killed. The flashback-heavy story plods along in a virtually suspense-free zone, enlivened only by some extremely offbeat casting decisions. Elliott Reid (Jane Russell's suitor in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes) has a lighter-than-air quality that makes him an odd but entertaining choice as romantic leading man, Max Showalter (billed here as Casey Adams) brings his frog-eyed energy as a society columnist, and future TV mogul Aaron Spelling pops up as a hotel desk clerk. As for Richard Boone, he needed some age and a few more wrinkles before he would become the delicious character actor he turned into later. And so we are left with a whodunit more sleep-inducing than intriguing. --Robert Horton

Customer Reviews

All were good character actors but I don't consider any of them the lead man or woman of a movie.
RJ from PH
Don't try to make anything out of it, out of that "forever" part like the cops in front of him tried to do and he laughed in their faces.
Alfred Johnson
The lack of true noir may have something to do with when it was made, after the major noir cycle.
LA Noir

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
"Vicki" is the second film adaptation of Steve Fisher's novel "I Wake Up Screaming". The first was an A-list film made 12 years earlier, released in 1942, that retained the novel's title. 1942's "I Wake Up Screaming" starred Victor Mature as Vicki's publicity man Frankie Christopher and featured Betty Grable in her first non-musical role as Jil Lynn. 1953's "Vicki" is a moderately budgeted affair without high-power stars. It is perhaps marginally film noir but bland overall. "Vicki" has a more extensive flashback structure than the 1942 film, which awkwardly overloads the first part of the film. That is not from the book, and Dwight Taylor is credited as screenwriter on both movies. "Vicki" seems to have been adapted from the earlier film rather than from Fisher's novel.

When famous model Vicki Lynn (Jean Peters) is found murdered in her New York apartment, gruff police detective Ed Cornell (Richard Boone) insists on taking the case. Miss Lynn left a string of admirers and sponsors high and dry when she decided to try her luck in Hollywood, so there is no shortage of suspects: Her jilted boyfriend, actor Robin Ray (Alex D'Arcy). Society columnist Larry Evans (Casey Adams), who made her the toast of the town. And publicity man Steve Christopher (Elliot Reid), who engineered Vicki's rapid rise to the darling of café society. But detective Cornell decides that Christopher is the guilty party and obsessively harasses the man, even badgering Vicki's sympathetic sister Jill (Jeanne Craine), who doubts Christopher's guilt.

"Vicki" is not a bad film, but it suffers by comparison to its predecessor. It lacks the stars' charisma of "I Wake Up Screaming" as well that film's menacing tone and psychosexual subtext.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Lee Taylor VINE VOICE on August 4, 2006
Format: DVD
This movie deserves a watching. Basically it is a remke of the better "I Wake Up Screaming." Richard Boone is very good as the cop after a murderer. Jean Peters and Carl Betz are also very good. Look for Aaron Spelling in the movie. The twist at the end make this one worthwhile.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By David Baldwin on September 16, 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In a nutshell, this remake of "I Wake Up Screaming" doesn't work whether you saw the original or this is your first time exposed to the story. The film is saddled with a blah cast and uninspired direction. The film's lone redeeming point is Richard Boone's account of dogged police detective Ed Cornell. Alas, that even suffers when compared to the masterful turn by Laird Cregar in "Screaming". This is by no means a bad film just an ordinary one. If it popped up on TCM you probably wouldn't be inclined to change the channel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Kevin W. Koehler on January 17, 2007
Format: DVD
I Wake Up Screaming must be some book. Not content with making a single film adaptation of it in 1941, 20th Century Fox gave it a second go-around twelve years later with this picture, now called Vicki. Regardless of whether anyone actually wakes up screaming (they don't), I think I like the original title better, if only for its pulpy luridness. Besides, the single word Vicki recalls noir siblings Gilda and Laura, which are quite simply in a different class (more on that later).

Jean Peters is no Rita Hayworth. Neither is she Gene Tierney. Hell, she's no Carole Landis, who plays the same role in Vicki's previous Screaming incarnation.

Not that this picture is terrible. Sure, it lacks Landis' sex appeal, Betty Grable's charm, and Edward Cronjager's dramatic noir cinematography of I Wake Up Screaming. Otherwise, it adheres so closely to the original, you would have thought Gus Van Sant directed it (indeed, whole shots, framing, and long passages of dialogue are copied exact - Dwight Taylor gets sole screenwriting credit on both pictures). And the original isn't bad.

The titular Vicki is a cover girl print model discovered as a waitress in a cafeteria (she is first seen framed in the proverbial shop window, where she would like to stay in perpetuity - modeling is, after all, a business of objectification), on the fast track to stardom until her murder puts an end to all that. We revisit her rise to fame through the reminiscing (and police interrogations) of her sister (Jeanne Crain) and romantic suitors (principally Elliott Reid), all suspects in the crime. However, the eagerness with which a certain police lieutenant (Richard Boone, not as good as Laird Cregar...am I repeating myself?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 8, 2006
Format: DVD
About twenty minutes into the noir film Vicki - just released on DVD - I started to think that the story seemed familiar. In fact it is! The film happens to be an almost scene-by-scene carbon copy of 1942's I Wake Up Screaming. The original starred Betty Grable and Carole Landis, and was what I consider to be one of the most impressive 40's noir films ever made.

Again utilizing flashback techniques, the film tells the tale of who killed the glamorous and fickle Vicki Lynn just as she was about to abandon the men who had made her a fashion model, for a job in Hollywood. In this version Jean Peters plays Vicki Lynn and Jeanne Crain plays her stenographer sister Jill. Elliot Reid plays Steve Christopher who along with Jill tries to uncover the mystery behind who really murdered Vicki.

The actors in this version are all pretty good, although Crain and Reid certainly don't have the hot-button chemistry that existed in the earlier version between Grable and Victor Mature. Richard Boone, who plays the detective - as Laird Cregar did - is also excellent but he leaves little doubt in his performance that this man is immorally nuts. He violently and cruelly abuses Reid's poor press agent and he mopes around the café at night where Vicki used to work.

Obviously subtly wasn't on the agenda of this remake. Some scenes have been expanded on and some have been edited out all together. But most unfortunate is the type of downsizing of the sets and the exterior locations. The sets for this remake are smaller and less interesting, the lighting is mostly undistinguished and the scenes requiring crowds or location work - nightclubs, the swimming pool and certain street scenes - are eliminated or reduced to nothing.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in