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Video Slut: How I Shoved Madonna Off an Olympic High Dive, Got Prince into a Pair of Tiny Purple Woolen Underpants, Ran Away from Michael Jackson's ... So I Could Bring Rock Videos to the Masses Paperback – May 25, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; First Edition edition (May 25, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0865479860
  • ISBN-13: 978-0865479869
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,402,051 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Oreck is a producer of films, commercials, and videos. An Academy Award nominee for the 1984 short film Tales of Meeting and Parting, she entered the music video industry that same year. Steering her company, O Pictures, from 1984 to 2000, she made hundreds of videos with minor and major music makers, including Mick Jagger, Sting, Madonna, Prince, and Chris Isaak. Looking back, she covers her career in a breakneck, word-juggling style as she introduces the reader to such respected video directors as Herb Ritts and Mary Lambert: With her blonde, baby-fine locks and cornflower blue eyes, Mary was a hipster ultrafemme from Arkansas with a yielding, buttered grits accent that allowed others to view her as a wide-eyed doe while she ran them down with a ten-ton truck. Amid such multilayered metaphors, she tosses off occasional funny lines as she recalls talent tantrums, budget constraints, daily disasters, and production problems while intercutting her own personal peaks, such as having a child at age 16. Switching between past and present tenses, Oreck succeeds in documenting the milestone merger of music/film history in this entertaining memoir. (May 18)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“It has been said (and not only by me) that the Music Video ‘Industry’ is (was) the worst aspects of the film industry and the worst aspects of the music industry combined. Sharon Oreck’s Video Slut is a loving record of that particularly ridiculous time and place when MTV owned a sizeable chunk of pop-culture real estate, ushering into existence a unique kind of Artist/Carny. These are stories from the front lines—told unflinchingly and hilariously by someone who obviously appreciated the absurdity as it was happening. Who owns the film rights?” —David Fincher, director of Fight Club and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

“This book is very, very funny and the eighties diva behavior Sharon Oreck describes is spot on and wonderful. But it’s also interesting to hear her own story of how she went from teen mom to accidental music video producer and went on to become one of the most successful producers of the MTV era.” —Sam Raimi, director of Spiderman and The Evil Dead series

“One thing I try not to make a habit of is blurbing; it’s a disgusting pastime and a one-way-dead-end for expression. But after reading Sharon Oreck’s deliciously witty book I decided to break my rule, which sent me tumbling down a steep and hellish slope, revisiting all of my horrible patterns and compulsions from the past, breaking every rule that I had ever made for myself. Thank you Video Slut. Thank you thank you thank you thank you.” —Michael Cera, star of Superbad and Youth in Revolt

“Oreck provides amusing, often biting glimpses of an array of hotties, druggies, incompetents and others who join with high-maintenance stars and pompous record-company executives to produce video promos for the latest song hits. Crises abound: Neighbors called the police when 20 crosses were set afire during a Madonna shoot; homeless cross-dressers pursued Janet Jackson on the streets of Los Angeles; and dozens of pigeons splattered on the ground after their release during the making of a Sheila E video . . . Frenetically entertaining.” —Kirkus Reviews


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Peony on June 27, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A unique book that can be looked at from a few angles.
It is autobiographical and interlaced with her time in the unwed mothers home and shooting rock videos in the 1980's.

I didn't know she was the Producer on some of the more famous video's such as Michael Jackson's In the Closet, a Janet Jackson video and Madonna's video, Like a Prayer. This is one very smart and hard working person, who overcame a difficult start in life (her pregnancy at 16)and she tells the story of this with self-effacing humour. However this can wear a bit thin and sometimes she is disrespectful to some of the artists, especially the Jacksons.

However this woman did triumph and it shows what a difficult place Hollywwod and those who work there can be.
You have to admire her for what she has achieved. The language is over the top and saccharine sometimes.
It is a quick read and gives some startling insights into music stars and super models. Sharon Orock rubbed shoulders with most of them.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. Carter on May 30, 2010
Format: Paperback
this book is a fun, funny, fantastic romp through the long-lost music business. It cleverly counterbalances the industry's height of excess in the 80's with sharon's own journey as a single mom in post-punk los angeles. good stuff, and great insightful writing too!
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Bigbird on June 28, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I purchased this book after hearing Ms. Oreck's interview on a radio station. Having grown up with the early days of MTV, it sounded fascinating and I wanted to learn more. Unfortunately, the book was not what I expected at all, which was more about the videos and entertainers. There was very little written about that. It was mostly about her life story and although interesting, just not what I expected. I forced myself to finish it only so my $$ wouldn't be a complete waste.
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By E. S. Charpentier on February 9, 2014
Format: Paperback
This book took me much longer to read than it should have because I kept having to go to my computer and YouTube the videos described within. For a child of the 80's I was really less familiar with them than I should have been. It might have been helpful for Oreck to put up a website with links to her work to make tracking them down less complicated.
For the most part, chapters regarding Ms. Oreck's large-scale productions were interspersed with ones about her personal life prior to becoming a rock video producer. I actually found the personal stories far more heartfelt and entertaining than the ones about spoiled celebrities and their crises.
The writing is, well, highly profane. Not that that was surprising considering the title, but some readers might be put off by it. It also seemed that there was an excessive amount of hyperbole and subterfuge. I'm sure Oreck felt she needed to spice things up a bit, but I'd venture to guess that a straightforward account of her experiences would have been just as fascinating. That said, however, it was fascinating. I would have liked to read more of it, actually.
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