Vietnam, Now: A Reporter Returns and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.00
  • Save: $3.17 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by hippo_books
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Item qualifies for FREE shipping and Prime! This item is used.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Vietnam, Now: A Reporter Returns Paperback – July 1, 2003


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.83
$4.91 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Vietnam, Now: A Reporter Returns + Vietnam: A Traveler's Literary Companion (Traveler's Literary Companions) + DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Vietnam and Angkor Wat
Price for all three: $45.96

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: PublicAffairs (July 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1586481835
  • ISBN-13: 978-1586481834
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.4 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #661,853 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

For most Americans, writes veteran correspondent David Lamb, "Vietnam was a war, not a country"--even worse, it was sometimes merely "an adjective, usually with a negative connotation." The author was practically a cub reporter when he covered the war a generation ago; in Vietnam, Now, he returns to it, bringing with him a sharp analytic eye developed over the ensuing years. His key observations include the unexpected fact that "the Vietnamese liked Americans.... They had put the war behind them in a way that many Americans hadn't." This is not to say that things have gone swimmingly for the Vietnamese, especially in an economic sense: "Vietnam was like a racehorse whose jockey kept yanking on the reins rather than giving the animal its head to find full stride." And lingering still is the divide between North and South: "The officially articulated policy was always that all Vietnamese were equal; it's just that it didn't turn out that way. Ironically, the communist leadership [in Hanoi] found it easier to reach out to its former enemy in Washington than to its own brethren in the South." Vietnam, Now is an ideal book for anybody interested in Southeast Asia, perhaps especially veterans who wonder whatever happened to that place where they fought so hard for so long. --John Miller --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"'Vietnam, Now' offers a tantalizing glimpse of this new kind of relationship between East and West." -- Los Angeles Times, June 16, 2002

"Engaging... Puts the American role in Vietnam into a much needed perspective." -- New York Times, May 29, 2002

"Part memoir, part historical narrative, part travelogue, part journalism, Lamb's worthy effort is a personality-driven look at Vietnam today." -- Publishers Weekly, April 29, 2002.

"The thing that makes [the book] exceptional, is that it deals with the part of human nature concerned with healing." -- Washington Post, June 9, 2002

"This well-paced book offers a provocative perspective on the history of Vietnam." -- USA Today, May 22, 2002.

"[A] humane and often moving account...[Lamb's book] catch[es] the promise and difficulty of life in Vietnam today." -- Time, June 3, 2002. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
5 star
12
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
3
See all 19 customer reviews
And it will prepare you well for the visit I hope you make someday.
Stephen Bridge
Mr. Lamb did a great job of capturing the spirit of the Vietnamese people and their history.
Stephen Mead
Still, I recommend this book as a balanced perspective of modern Vietnam.
D. F. Utz

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By D. F. Utz on September 13, 2002
Format: Hardcover
David Lamb's "Vietnam, Now" provides a balanced perspective on modern Vietnam. Lamb first worked as a UPI reporter in South Vietnam in 1968. He returned in 1997 as a correspondent for the Los Angeles Times and lived in Hanoi with his wife for four years.
Other recent books about modern Vietnam (such as Robert Templer's "Shadows and Wind" and Henry Kamm's "Dragon Ascending") seem to put a negative spin on everything in Vietnam. However, in "Vietnam, Now" David Lamb chooses to take a more realistic and slightly optimistic view.
In his stories of life in Vietnam, he acknowledges the poverty of the people and corruption and stubbornness of the ruling old guard. However, he puts things in perspective.
As is the case in most books on Vietnam, a lot of stories are related to the American War: US veterans return to Vietnam for closure; North Vietnam war memorials are in good shape and the South Vietnam war memorials aren't; one son fought in the north and one in the south.
It's easy to see why some people have written negative reviews about this book. Some persons who have sacrificed and lost much in this country cannot acknowledge that anything good can exist in Vietnam while the communists are in charge.
Still, I recommend this book as a balanced perspective of modern Vietnam. If you do want another opinion of the country, I recommend Templer's "Shadows and Wind." Or, better yet, read both these books and then visit Vietnam the country and judge for yourself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Anil K. Malhotra on May 14, 2002
Format: Hardcover
David Lamb's " Vietnam Now" is a brilliantly evocative book on life in Vietnam in the late 1990's. It captures eloquently the way Vietnamese have come to terms with their past. It brings to life the spirit, the courage and the generosity of spirit and the gentleness of the people. What David is able to do through
his superbly crafted vignettes of modern day life is to humanize a people and a country too often dismissed as a war.
He is able to blend the past history of the country and its impacts on the present by tracing them through the lives of fascinating people?Trinh Thi Ngo or `Hanoi Hannah, Pham Xuan An, the Time reporters whose cover as a Viet Cong colonel was blown only in 1978, General Giap who now leads a quiet life in a villa in Hanoi after a lifetime of war..... David writes for the first time of the "Vietnam's wandering tribe of mourners"- thousands of mothers and fathers, wives and brothers and sisters who spent their time searching out witnesses, digging up marked graves- all desperate for clues that would help them locate the remains of loved ones. And the Vietnamese MIA number over 300,000..... As David points out Americans became " so self-obsessed with our pain that we never thought much about theirs? a stunning statistic : one out of every ten Vietnamese was killed or wounded in war". He seeks to set the balance right. .......
This book is a combined history lesson, guidebook and a reflection on modern day life in Vietnam. It brings to life a country not only its history and its culture but even more importantly its life and soul.............recommended to all seeking to understand a country and how it is able to overcome insuperable odds and yet survive with its soul intact.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Linda Linguvic HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 21, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I don't think there's any American who can hear the word "Vietnam" and not have feelings about the awful conflict that divided a nation and ushered in a new way of looking at war. However, most of these recollections go back thirty years. It's different now. And that is the theme of this book by journalist David Lamb, who covered the Vietnam War as a young reporter in the late 1960s. Then, in 1997, the Los Angeles Times sent him to Hanoi for four years. This book is a result of his observations.
One of his remarkable discoveries is that in spite of the war, the Vietnamese people like Americans and he was treated well wherever he went. Vietnam is now Communist, but it is not the same communism that was typical of the cold war and the Soviet Union. Through the years, the hard line has softened, small businesses are thriving and the standard of living has improved. And the younger generation finds it is not necessary to join the Communist party in order to get into school or get a job, which was formerly the case.
The history of Vietnam is long and sad. Mostly, they were conquered by one country after another. When the French moved out, the Americans moved in to South Vietnam. They were trying to protect it from Communism but the people in the North really loved their leader and wanted to unify the country. The war was bitter and more than one out of every ten Vietnamese died. Then, after the War, the South Vietnamese were treated badly. They were sent to re-education camps for years and even when they came out, they could no longer get jobs. There are interviews with South Vietnamese in the book and they have somehow reconciled themselves to this. It is the younger generation who have the opportunities.
In the North, the people who fought are treated better.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Bridge on October 4, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I visited Vietnam with my wife in 1999 to adopt a daughter, and my wife visited there again last year to adopt our second daughter. Lamb's book accurately reflects most of what I have learned about Vietnam, including the amazing Vietnamese people, and the seeming disconnect between their daily lives and their government. I can't guarantee that every word is accurate; it is a complex country that is changing is many ways. But I do think you will learn more about Viet Nam from this book than from any other I have read. And it will prepare you well for the visit I hope you make someday.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?