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Vietnam: The Australian War MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Bolinda Audio; MP3 Una edition (November 19, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1743141521
  • ISBN-13: 978-1743141526
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.3 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,143,438 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Paul Ham is the author of the highly acclaimed Kokoda (HarperCollins, 2004) and the Australia correspondent of the London Sunday Times. He was born and educated in Australia and lives in Sydney, having spent several years working in Britain as a journalist and publisher. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From AudioFile

Get ready for an audiobook about the Vietnam War, seen through Australian eyes. The Communist threat loomed ominously to Australia, and Chinese support for the war impelled the Australians to take action at the beginning. Starting with a detailed history of Vietnam as an independent country, then a Chinese colony, and then a French colony gives an excellent background for those new to the subject. Like the author, narrator Peter Byrne speaks the English accent from "down under." Reading with short pauses for quoted material, he avoids theatrical characterizations as there would be too many to add any usefulness to the presentation. With no loss to his impact, he sticks to the detached view used by the author. J.A.H. © AudioFile 2009, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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See all 10 customer reviews
Ted Serong was a true Australian patriot and hero.
Dr Neil MacNeill
What more can I say, great story, my admiration for what our blokes done will never diminish, Some of the facts I learnt from this story will never leave my mind.
brian cordell
If you want to read about the Vietnam war from a different perspective i recommend this book.
Paul Mitchell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Dr Neil MacNeill on December 28, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Vietnam: The Australian War.

A thoughtful friend gave me this book for Christmas (2007) and for the two days of hard reading I was transported back through 40 years to the red earth, the sticky humidity and green foliage of South Vietnam.

The sixties and seventies were a time of massive societal upheaval in Australia, as they were in America. Vietnam became the catalyst that saw the austere, gerontocracies that had dominated society since the Great Depression cast aside by the more hedonistic Baby Boomers, who had developed a different view of life. Having lived through this era, and having served in Vietnam as a National Serviceman (conscripted 1967-1968) it was often difficult for me to see the inter-relatedness of the changes and events. Paul Ham has done an excellent job in putting together most of the pieces of the jigsaw that describe Australia's involvement in the Vietnam War in this divisive and highly emotive period of Australia's modernisation.

The difficulty for any author with such a complex topic is the question of what to use, and what to leave out. And then, where to insert parts of the story that don't actually fit the chronological recount. Using a scaffold employed in documentary film, Ham tells the main story and inserts the stand-alone pieces that help break up the linear presentation.

The strongest chapters in the book are those that relate to the battle at Long Tan. The author has described for the first time the use of SIGINT and the role of 547 Signal Troop in the lead-up to the battle. Of real interest was the lack of decisiveness of the upper echelons of the Task Force to extract D/6RAR from its life threatening situation. Without the astute leadership of Harry Smith and the brilliant F.O.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Pearler 47 on September 15, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The history of Australia's Vietnam war is comprehensively put together and explained well. Where I parted company was with the author's convoluted attempts to justify the war from a South Vietnamese point of view. I accept that there are no absolutes in this, and I accept that the North was not lily white. But the repeated statement that 320,000 Chinese troops laboured behind the front to free up North Vietnamese troops, and that this was an unfair advantage, I thought lacked logic. Consider that 550,000 American and other forces actually fought for the South and provided a huge amount of modern firepower as well. I figure this more than counterbalances the 320,000 Chinese non-combatants..
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dr Neil MacNeill on December 11, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Vietnam: The Australian War.

A thoughtful friend gave me this book for Christmas (2007) and for the two days of hard reading I was transported back through 40 years to the red earth, the sticky humidity and green foliage of South Vietnam.

The sixties and seventies were a time of massive societal upheaval in Australia, as they were in America. Vietnam became the catalyst that saw the austere, gerontocracies that had dominated society since the Great Depression cast aside by the more hedonistic Baby Boomers, who had developed a different view of life. Having lived through this era, and having served in Vietnam as a National Serviceman (conscripted 1967-1968) it was often difficult for me to see the inter-relatedness of the changes and events. Paul Ham has done an excellent job in putting together most of the pieces of the jigsaw that describe Australia's involvement in the Vietnam War in this divisive and highly emotive period of Australia's modernisation.

The difficulty for any author with such a complex topic is the question of what to use, and what to leave out. And then, where to insert parts of the story that don't actually fit the chronological recount. Using a scaffold employed in documentary film, Ham tells the main story and inserts the stand-alone pieces that help break up the linear presentation.

The strongest chapters in the book are those that relate to the battle at Long Tan. The author has described for the first time the use of SIGINT and the role of 547 Signal Troop in the lead-up to the battle. Of real interest was the lack of decisiveness of the upper echelons of the Task Force to extract D/6RAR from its life threatening situation. Without the astute leadership of Harry Smith and the brilliant F.O.
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By Wiley on March 2, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the first book I have read on the Vietnam war that starts out with a brief history of the country. I also enjoyed the political analysis in addition to the history. The book is well worth reading for any history buff, and gives me as an American a look at the war from down under, so to speak.
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By brian cordell on December 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
What more can I say, great story, my admiration for what our blokes done will never diminish, Some of the facts I learnt from this story will never leave my mind. Well done
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