Customer Reviews


16 Reviews
5 star:
 (5)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shock Room: Vile Things
Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror
Edited by Cheryl Mullenax

Featuring new or recent fiction by a dozen authors and anchored by reprints from horror literary giants Ramsey Campbell and Graham Masterton, the 2009 Comet Press anthology Vile Things answers such questions as:

How can a mad scientist, who is also a family man, keep his...
Published on September 10, 2009 by S. P. Miskowski

versus
20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mostly conventional despite the title but a few stories do stand out
Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror is something of a mixed bag. What you get out of it will largely depend on just what you're looking for when you want to read horror. If you want stories that will make you squirm, then Vile Things will definitely succeed on that level. Every story in this anthology has a fairly high "ick" factor and if that's what scares you,...
Published on January 16, 2010 by Whitt Patrick Pond


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shock Room: Vile Things, September 10, 2009
By 
This review is from: Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror (Paperback)
Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror
Edited by Cheryl Mullenax

Featuring new or recent fiction by a dozen authors and anchored by reprints from horror literary giants Ramsey Campbell and Graham Masterton, the 2009 Comet Press anthology Vile Things answers such questions as:

How can a mad scientist, who is also a family man, keep his household electronics running once he decides to go green?

Why should you never cross the threshold of an apartment that bears an obscene portrait of a rooster?

How do you get even with a roommate whose only crime is being irresistible?

Rarely does one volume of work by such a wide range of experienced and emerging writers offer the abundance of creepiness found in Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror. Maggots, animals and people slither this way and that, sometimes erotically, sometimes horrifically and occasionally both--as in Angel Leigh McCoy's devilishly sensual "Coquettrice." In addition to McCoy's story, I especially liked the ruthless wit of Stefan Pearson's "Going Green." But there are many delights to be found here.

In Sean Logan's geek revenge story "Tenant's Rights" a slovenly upstairs renter turns peeping tom, drilling holes in the floor to spy on the handsome roommate whose sexual charisma--and magnificent hair--have driven him to distraction. The anti-hero of "The Caterpillar" by C. Dennis Moore stumbles toward a state of grace and awe, thanks to an unexpected connection to his disfigured young cousin.

These are not typical or predictable tales of horror. While a couple of the pieces lack polish, there is no shortage of originality. If you think, as I do, that the most exotic images and disturbing acts lurk in the basement next door or the apartment across the hall, here is the material for your next nightmare.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mostly conventional despite the title but a few stories do stand out, January 16, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror (Paperback)
Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror is something of a mixed bag. What you get out of it will largely depend on just what you're looking for when you want to read horror. If you want stories that will make you squirm, then Vile Things will definitely succeed on that level. Every story in this anthology has a fairly high "ick" factor and if that's what scares you, then this is definitely an anthology you'll want to read.

For myself, however, this anthology was a bit disappointing. When I see a sub-title promising "Extreme Deviations of Horror", I expect stories that will really push the envelope, that will be so unsettling as to generate controversy or come with a cautionary note. Vile Things is not, despite its title, one of those anthologies. Most of the stories were - other than the high ick factor - fairly conventional, and far too many rely on what I would term the 'outside agent' factor, i.e. horrible things happen but it's because of some third-party making them happen, which both distances the reader from the horror and removes any responsibility for the character's actions. It's the literary equivalent of "The devil made me do it!", which is not at all the same as a deal-with-the-devil story. For me, real horror, the best horror, leaves the reader unsettled, altering their world view in such a way that they don't feel quite as safe or comfortable as they did before reading the story. A really good horror story will stay with the reader long, long after the reading is done.

From that perspective, there are a few stories here that I can recommend, first and foremost being Ramsey Campbell's "Again" where a lone hiker takes the path less traveled and witnesses something that neither he nor the reader will ever be able to get out of their head. It is a mark of Campbell's mastery of the genre that he twists the knife at the very end with a single word that takes the reader from being merely repulsed to being truly horrified. Tim Curran's "Maggots" follows the descent of a French soldier in Napoleon's retreat from Moscow from desperation into damnation. While it relies on an outside agent, it is the best ghoul story I've ever read, all the more so as it is told from the ghoul's point of view. If you've ever wondered what it would be mean to be a ghoul - and why you'd never, ever want to be one - this is a must read. Jeffrey Thomas' "Rat King" takes on a seemingly overused plot - a Nazi concentration camp guard becomes the victim of his victims - but takes it in a very disturbing direction. And even as you realize that this isn't the story you'd expected it to be, you will not be able to stop until the very end, when the unnamed guard's parting words leave you feeling unsettled and unclean.

All in all, this is not a bad anthology. At least three of the stories are first-rate by any horror standard, and the rest are really a matter of just what in particular the reader is looking for in horror. If you want something that will make you squirm and keep you squirming from beginning to end, then this is a book you'll want to read. If you want something that will unsettle you, that will stick uncomfortably in your mind long after you've put the book aside, then the three stories I mentioned will make it worth your while.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not for the squeamish, March 17, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror (Paperback)
This anthology at first seems like a book that is built upon gross things and who wants a horror story where there is only gore? But if you get past the first couple stories or skip them, you will find there is some good writing in there. Particularly "The Devil Lives in Jersey" by Z.F. Kilgore and "Sepsis" by Graham Masterson. There is some humor in here. "Tenant's Rights" by Sean Logan will have you laugh and squirm at the same time and so will "Going Green" by Stefan Pierson. A good book for those looking for some blood, guts, and other sick things in their horror stories.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not for the faint of heart (or weak of stomach)..., December 1, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror (Paperback)
Being a horror connoisseur who has breezed through the majority of the local bookstore's specialty section, I found myself scouring the Internet for good anthologies. They're easily the best way to introduce yourself to a new author and familiarize yourself with underground talents; "Sex Crimes" by Hart D. Fisher and Joseph Monks remains to this day one of the most treasured horror novels on my shelf. So when I stumbled across "Vile Things" I ordered it without sky-high hopes, praying it would at least be worth my fifteen dollars.

When the book arrived, I was impressed with the overall design and layout. It's tightly bound, with excellent craftsmanship and a beautiful, eye-catching cover. The font is easily read and a good size. There are very few, if any, typographical errors within, which makes for a very professional product in the end. I was very pleased, and began to read.

This is a very GOOD anthology. The stories race through a wide myriad of subject matter, from historical period pieces on cannibalistic soldiers in the revolution to an ecology-conscious man using his mother-in-law's undead indignation to fuel his energy-efficient house, but there is one common thread that links them all together--- they are GROSS. The stories lovingly describe everything from fetid flesh, a half-melted cat corpse, and a loop of intestine, leaving nothing out. They go to great lengths to describe the scents, tastes, sights and sounds of every aspect of the repulsive scenes the writers are penning, leaving the reader gruesomely hooked. There are a few duds in the collection, but they are very few and far-between; for the most part this book is full of disgusting little goodies that pop in your brain like balloons full of corrosive acid. A few hours after putting it down, a random line will seep into your conscious and you'll shudder in revulsion.

The book is NOT for those who are easily grossed out; you won't find any purple prose or cut-away tastefulness here. No, every gory detail is spotlighted, celebrated and lovingly placed on a pedestal in an attempt to get the audiences gagging; fans of extreme splatterpunk or gross-out horror will find this a savory offering. Those who prefer 'tamer', more mainstream fare like Stephen King and Dean Koontz will find themselves cringing in a corner--- here there be monsters, and they aren't apologizing for being their vile selves.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Splatterpunk for the new Millennium, March 26, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror (Paperback)
Vile Things is an anthology of extreme horror. I know what you're thinking, sure its extreme, but how extreme could it really be? Many anthologies have come before promising "extreme" horror but that promise usually goes unfulfilled. Vile Things delivers. Every story within is extreme in some fashion or another, many of which deal with body horror, a personal favorite of mine. One story in particular, Maggots by Tim Curran was so extreme it made me nauseous, and I read it after watched gorefest Bone Sickness. Yeesh. I will be tracking down his novels soon. Most of the authors here are on the rise or have been dealing depravity in the underground while most of us missed out, which is doubly awesome. I love discovering new authors. Its like a treasure hunt, and I found the mother load. Rat King by Jeffery Thomas about a nazi death camp worker was particularly well written and nasty and The Devil Lives in Jersey by Z.F. Kilgore, a story about a big city cop in a small town haunted by a demon left me wanting much more from him. Fungoid by Randy Chandler was hilarious and disgusting and Coquettrice by Angel Leigh McCoy about a demon that steals men to breed with, was unique and graphic. In fact horror mainstays Ramsey Campbell and Graham Masterton's stories are the weakest of all which should tell you something. 15 stories in all, nicely published by Comet Press, a new publisher to keep your eyes on.

So, if you enjoy extreme horror, nausea, and pushing the literary envelope check out Vile Things, its the Splatterpunk of the new millennium. It's worth every penny.
[...].
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book delivers!, October 9, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror (Paperback)
"Vile Things" is well named. I read a lot of "horror" that really isn't all that "horrible" (unless you count misspellings, poor grammar or poor editing). "Vile Things" however, is just what it says it is, nice, gross bleeding horror. There a few clunkers in the collection and a few of the stories have appeared elsewhere, but overall this is a very good collection of grue, gore and bizarre concepts. If you like your horror to be horrible then buy this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Disgusting, in a really good way., March 25, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror (Paperback)
Lives up to the title. The stories are vivid with good visual impact and make you think, whether you want to or not.
Not a bad story in the bunch. Some will make you shiver, some will make you go "Eww-[...]" A good late night read if you don't need much sleep. After some of these stories are read you won't want to sleep. If you drink tequila I bet you stop after one story in this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not Impressed, February 16, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror (Paperback)
First let me start by saying that I love horror stories so when I seen this book I bought it. It arrived before it was suppose to and in a good package. But the book it's self was well.....disappointing. Most of the stories I found to be poorly written and uninteresting. I wasn't impressed at all and wont be buying anymore books from the series just because I found this book so bad. There were two stories in the whole book that I actually enjoyed: Tenant's Rights by Sean Logan was pretty good. And The Devil lives in Jersey by Z.F Kilgore was probably the best one in the whole book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars DECENTLY VILE, March 23, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror (Paperback)
'Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror' is a collection of dark and sometimes disgusting tales. Quality of the stories vary. Some read like the work of writers still in the process of mastering their craft, rough around the edges but still entertaining. Others are much more polished, and well-established writers such as Ramsey Campbell are represented here too. There's nothing subtle about these stories. Masturbation, violence, and bodily fluids galore. If you like your horror with an edge, this is for you. If you like the emphasis on atmosphere, you might want to look elsewhere. Me, I dug it.

James Pratt, author of 'Cthelvis and Others'
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Nice Slice of Horror, June 2, 2011
By 
Daniel P. Coughlin (Orange County, CA USA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror (Paperback)
Vile Things was filled with great horror stories that kept my interest from page 1 til the end. Tim Curran's "Maggots" was a favorite of mine filled with disgusting prose that ruined my appetite. If your into intense, funny and well written horror then Vile Things is for you.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror
Vile Things: Extreme Deviations of Horror by Cheryl Mullenax (Paperback - June 1, 2009)
$14.95 $13.18
In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process.
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.