Vince Gill

Like (8)
|

Stay Up To Date

Sorry, there was an error with your request.
Sorry, there was an error with your request.
You are subscribed to new release e-mails for Vince Gill.
You are no longer subscribed to new release e-mails for Vince Gill.
Sorry, there was an error with your request.
Please wait...

Top Albums by Vince Gill (See all 44 albums)


See all 44 albums by Vince Gill

All music downloads by Vince Gill
Sort by:
Bestselling
1-10 of 315
Song Title Album Prime  
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

Videos


Image of Vince Gill
Provided by the artist or their representative


At a Glance

Birthname: Vincent Grant Gill
Nationality: American
Born: Apr 12 1957


Biography

Vince Gill ... Read more

Vince Gill & Paul Franklin - Bakersfield

The glow on a child’s face at Christmas pales in the light that beams from Vince Gill and Paul Franklin when they reflect on how much the songs of Buck Owens and Merle Haggard have meant to them. Both men were kids, weren’t even teenagers yet—Gill in Oklahoma City, Franklin in Detroit—when that urgent, high-voltage sound rolled out of Bakersfield, California and engulfed them in a tidal wave of ecstasy and heartache. They’ve not been the same since.

From their memories of that experience, Gill and steel guitarist Franklin have fashioned the album Bakersfield, a perfectly matched set of five Owens and five Haggard classics that pulsate with all the emotional fervor of the originals. Owens is represented by “Foolin’ Around,” “He Don’t Deserve You Anymore,” “Nobody’s Fool But Yours,” “But I Do” and “Together Again,” while Haggard surfaces via “Holding Things Together,” “The Fightin’ Side Of Me,” “I Can’t Be Myself,” “Branded Man” and “The Bottle Let Me Down.” All these songs were originally released between 1961 and 1974.

“My history with Buck Owens is so deep and so long and so much a part of being grounded in my childhood,” Gill says. “Those TV shows he did were filmed in Oklahoma City where I grew up. I didn’t know that then or I would have been down there every Saturday watching. As for Merle, his songs are so compelling and truthful, for me he’s the greatest living country singer and songwriter ever.”

Franklin’s roots and admiration run just as deep: “In spite of all Vince and I have done as musicians—all the things that are modern and that we also love—this album says more about who we are at our core. I got my first steel at eight-and-a-half, and by the time I was nine years old, it was listening to Buck Owens and Merle Haggard that kept driving me to learn how to play music.”

Like Gill, whom he has known for more than 30 years, Franklin is a member of The Time Jumpers, the ad hoc band of studio musicians cherished for their expertise in traditional country and western swing music. Franklin hit the big time at 16 playing on Gallery’s gold-winning pop single, “It’s So Nice To Be With You.” He migrated from Detroit to Nashville in 1972 to play steel for Barbara Mandrell. Since then, he has toured and/or recorded with Jerry Reed, Mel Tillis, Sting, Mark Knopfler, Shania Twain, George Strait, Barbra Streisand and Megadeth. He was 13 times the Academy of Country Music’s steel guitar player of the year.

Gill’s guitar and vocals grace more than 400 albums—in addition to his own. He’s won 20 Grammys, 18 Country Music Association Awards and is a member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Bakersfield is his first duet album.

It was playing with the Time Jumpers and hearing the crowds’ rapturous applause that led Gill to approach Franklin with the idea for this album. “The Time Jumpers are so good,” he says, “that you can call out any tune you want to play and everybody can play it. For some reason, I’d always call out ‘Holding Things Together’ or ‘Together Again’—two songs I’ve sung my whole life. When we do these songs, they’re show-stoppers. And when Paul finishes the solo on ‘Together Again,’ the whole club erupts. That’s heaven on earth. It's so much fun to play for people who are absolutely starved for what you’re doing.”
Gill had a very clear reason for choosing Franklin as a recording partner and co-producer. “I’m such a lover of the steel guitar,” he explains. “It’s my favorite instrument. It’s what’s so achingly beautiful about country music. Just as the sound of the banjo defines bluegrass, the sound of the steel guitar defines country music. So I talked to Paul and said, ‘Do you think it would be fun to do a record?’ I didn’t want to do an instrumental record. They never hold my attention for an entire record. I said, ‘How about if I sing, and then we just play those great old songs? We’ll have a blast.’ And he was up for it.”

Once they decided to walk the streets of Bakersfield, Gill says he isolated three songs he absolutely had to have on the album. “Deal breakers,” he called them. They were “Holding Things Together,” “Together Again” and “I Can’t Be Myself With You.” Fortunately, they were among Franklin’s favorites, as well. But finding Owens and Haggard songs they both loved was the easy part. Narrowing down the list to five each was hard. “We could have done 500 and 500,” Gill says. “What was fun for me was finding two great Buck songs I didn’t know—‘He Don’t Deserve You Anymore’ and ‘But I Do.’” They made the cut, too.
From the outset, Gill and Franklin agreed they wouldn’t record sound-alike versions.

“The album is very much borrowed from and inspired by the originals,” Gill says, “but it’s done in our own way—the way we chose to play and sing it. There was no point in doing a note-for-note.” Both men assumed Don Rich had provided the harmony vocals on the Owens’ songs they picked, because of seeing him sing on Buck’s early tv shows, but WSM-AM disc jockey and country music historian Eddie Stubbs informed them that Owens sang his own harmonies on the early records. And that’s what Gill did. On four of the Haggard songs, however, Time Jumper Dawn Sears, and Gill, sang harmony.

Gill and Franklin tracked the album in two days at Gill’s home studio, backed by a “killer band” made up of John Hobbs, piano; Greg Morrow, drums; Willie Weeks and Brad Albin, bass; J. T. Corenflos, electric rhythm guitar; and Time Jumpers Kenny Sears, Larry Franklin and Joe Spivey, fiddles. Gill played all the acoustic and electric guitar fills and solos.
“So, this is just as much a guitar record for me,” Gill says, “as it is a singing record. But it was fun for me to sing a whole record of the greatest songs ever. I guess what I’m real proud of is that when it’s one of Buck’s songs, I sing it very much in that vein. And the Haggard songs are very much in the vein he sang. With Buck’s songs, you won’t find much vibrato in my vocals, and with Merle’s, it will come down to a low note and that quiver.”

Gill and Franklin go to some length in Bakersfield to honor certain pickers who backed Owens and Haggard early in their careers. Among these were stellar guitarists James Burton, Roy Nichols, Don Rich, Reggie Young, Buck, Merle, and fabled steel players Ralph Mooney, Tom Brumley, Norm Hamlet and J.D. Maness. “Years ago,” Franklin says, “there was a Burton and Mooney album [called Corn Pickin’ and Slick Slidin] that was all instrumental. But you could hear the ‘conversation’ between them as they played. We wanted to maintain that same kind of conversation between the guitar and steel on our record.”

“I was obviously looking for what would suit the steel guitar,” Gill adds. “That was the whole impetus behind all the songs we chose to do—that and some of the chicken pickin’ kind of guitar stuff James Burton did so much on Merle’s records.”

Although he’s spent much of his career in the spotlight, Gill insists his greatest joy is in being a sideman. “The only reason any of us learned to play was to collaborate and play with someone else. It’s not much fun by yourself. This record has been a great experience for me—to go back and honor the things that I hold dearest.”

“This may be Vince’s greatest project,” Franklin declares. “What a showcase! I’ve heard him sing for 30 years, but he sings licks on this record I never heard before.”

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Vince Gill & Paul Franklin - Bakersfield

The glow on a child’s face at Christmas pales in the light that beams from Vince Gill and Paul Franklin when they reflect on how much the songs of Buck Owens and Merle Haggard have meant to them. Both men were kids, weren’t even teenagers yet—Gill in Oklahoma City, Franklin in Detroit—when that urgent, high-voltage sound rolled out of Bakersfield, California and engulfed them in a tidal wave of ecstasy and heartache. They’ve not been the same since.

From their memories of that experience, Gill and steel guitarist Franklin have fashioned the album Bakersfield, a perfectly matched set of five Owens and five Haggard classics that pulsate with all the emotional fervor of the originals. Owens is represented by “Foolin’ Around,” “He Don’t Deserve You Anymore,” “Nobody’s Fool But Yours,” “But I Do” and “Together Again,” while Haggard surfaces via “Holding Things Together,” “The Fightin’ Side Of Me,” “I Can’t Be Myself,” “Branded Man” and “The Bottle Let Me Down.” All these songs were originally released between 1961 and 1974.

“My history with Buck Owens is so deep and so long and so much a part of being grounded in my childhood,” Gill says. “Those TV shows he did were filmed in Oklahoma City where I grew up. I didn’t know that then or I would have been down there every Saturday watching. As for Merle, his songs are so compelling and truthful, for me he’s the greatest living country singer and songwriter ever.”

Franklin’s roots and admiration run just as deep: “In spite of all Vince and I have done as musicians—all the things that are modern and that we also love—this album says more about who we are at our core. I got my first steel at eight-and-a-half, and by the time I was nine years old, it was listening to Buck Owens and Merle Haggard that kept driving me to learn how to play music.”

Like Gill, whom he has known for more than 30 years, Franklin is a member of The Time Jumpers, the ad hoc band of studio musicians cherished for their expertise in traditional country and western swing music. Franklin hit the big time at 16 playing on Gallery’s gold-winning pop single, “It’s So Nice To Be With You.” He migrated from Detroit to Nashville in 1972 to play steel for Barbara Mandrell. Since then, he has toured and/or recorded with Jerry Reed, Mel Tillis, Sting, Mark Knopfler, Shania Twain, George Strait, Barbra Streisand and Megadeth. He was 13 times the Academy of Country Music’s steel guitar player of the year.

Gill’s guitar and vocals grace more than 400 albums—in addition to his own. He’s won 20 Grammys, 18 Country Music Association Awards and is a member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Bakersfield is his first duet album.

It was playing with the Time Jumpers and hearing the crowds’ rapturous applause that led Gill to approach Franklin with the idea for this album. “The Time Jumpers are so good,” he says, “that you can call out any tune you want to play and everybody can play it. For some reason, I’d always call out ‘Holding Things Together’ or ‘Together Again’—two songs I’ve sung my whole life. When we do these songs, they’re show-stoppers. And when Paul finishes the solo on ‘Together Again,’ the whole club erupts. That’s heaven on earth. It's so much fun to play for people who are absolutely starved for what you’re doing.”
Gill had a very clear reason for choosing Franklin as a recording partner and co-producer. “I’m such a lover of the steel guitar,” he explains. “It’s my favorite instrument. It’s what’s so achingly beautiful about country music. Just as the sound of the banjo defines bluegrass, the sound of the steel guitar defines country music. So I talked to Paul and said, ‘Do you think it would be fun to do a record?’ I didn’t want to do an instrumental record. They never hold my attention for an entire record. I said, ‘How about if I sing, and then we just play those great old songs? We’ll have a blast.’ And he was up for it.”

Once they decided to walk the streets of Bakersfield, Gill says he isolated three songs he absolutely had to have on the album. “Deal breakers,” he called them. They were “Holding Things Together,” “Together Again” and “I Can’t Be Myself With You.” Fortunately, they were among Franklin’s favorites, as well. But finding Owens and Haggard songs they both loved was the easy part. Narrowing down the list to five each was hard. “We could have done 500 and 500,” Gill says. “What was fun for me was finding two great Buck songs I didn’t know—‘He Don’t Deserve You Anymore’ and ‘But I Do.’” They made the cut, too.
From the outset, Gill and Franklin agreed they wouldn’t record sound-alike versions.

“The album is very much borrowed from and inspired by the originals,” Gill says, “but it’s done in our own way—the way we chose to play and sing it. There was no point in doing a note-for-note.” Both men assumed Don Rich had provided the harmony vocals on the Owens’ songs they picked, because of seeing him sing on Buck’s early tv shows, but WSM-AM disc jockey and country music historian Eddie Stubbs informed them that Owens sang his own harmonies on the early records. And that’s what Gill did. On four of the Haggard songs, however, Time Jumper Dawn Sears, and Gill, sang harmony.

Gill and Franklin tracked the album in two days at Gill’s home studio, backed by a “killer band” made up of John Hobbs, piano; Greg Morrow, drums; Willie Weeks and Brad Albin, bass; J. T. Corenflos, electric rhythm guitar; and Time Jumpers Kenny Sears, Larry Franklin and Joe Spivey, fiddles. Gill played all the acoustic and electric guitar fills and solos.
“So, this is just as much a guitar record for me,” Gill says, “as it is a singing record. But it was fun for me to sing a whole record of the greatest songs ever. I guess what I’m real proud of is that when it’s one of Buck’s songs, I sing it very much in that vein. And the Haggard songs are very much in the vein he sang. With Buck’s songs, you won’t find much vibrato in my vocals, and with Merle’s, it will come down to a low note and that quiver.”

Gill and Franklin go to some length in Bakersfield to honor certain pickers who backed Owens and Haggard early in their careers. Among these were stellar guitarists James Burton, Roy Nichols, Don Rich, Reggie Young, Buck, Merle, and fabled steel players Ralph Mooney, Tom Brumley, Norm Hamlet and J.D. Maness. “Years ago,” Franklin says, “there was a Burton and Mooney album [called Corn Pickin’ and Slick Slidin] that was all instrumental. But you could hear the ‘conversation’ between them as they played. We wanted to maintain that same kind of conversation between the guitar and steel on our record.”

“I was obviously looking for what would suit the steel guitar,” Gill adds. “That was the whole impetus behind all the songs we chose to do—that and some of the chicken pickin’ kind of guitar stuff James Burton did so much on Merle’s records.”

Although he’s spent much of his career in the spotlight, Gill insists his greatest joy is in being a sideman. “The only reason any of us learned to play was to collaborate and play with someone else. It’s not much fun by yourself. This record has been a great experience for me—to go back and honor the things that I hold dearest.”

“This may be Vince’s greatest project,” Franklin declares. “What a showcase! I’ve heard him sing for 30 years, but he sings licks on this record I never heard before.”

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Vince Gill & Paul Franklin - Bakersfield

The glow on a child’s face at Christmas pales in the light that beams from Vince Gill and Paul Franklin when they reflect on how much the songs of Buck Owens and Merle Haggard have meant to them. Both men were kids, weren’t even teenagers yet—Gill in Oklahoma City, Franklin in Detroit—when that urgent, high-voltage sound rolled out of Bakersfield, California and engulfed them in a tidal wave of ecstasy and heartache. They’ve not been the same since.

From their memories of that experience, Gill and steel guitarist Franklin have fashioned the album Bakersfield, a perfectly matched set of five Owens and five Haggard classics that pulsate with all the emotional fervor of the originals. Owens is represented by “Foolin’ Around,” “He Don’t Deserve You Anymore,” “Nobody’s Fool But Yours,” “But I Do” and “Together Again,” while Haggard surfaces via “Holding Things Together,” “The Fightin’ Side Of Me,” “I Can’t Be Myself,” “Branded Man” and “The Bottle Let Me Down.” All these songs were originally released between 1961 and 1974.

“My history with Buck Owens is so deep and so long and so much a part of being grounded in my childhood,” Gill says. “Those TV shows he did were filmed in Oklahoma City where I grew up. I didn’t know that then or I would have been down there every Saturday watching. As for Merle, his songs are so compelling and truthful, for me he’s the greatest living country singer and songwriter ever.”

Franklin’s roots and admiration run just as deep: “In spite of all Vince and I have done as musicians—all the things that are modern and that we also love—this album says more about who we are at our core. I got my first steel at eight-and-a-half, and by the time I was nine years old, it was listening to Buck Owens and Merle Haggard that kept driving me to learn how to play music.”

Like Gill, whom he has known for more than 30 years, Franklin is a member of The Time Jumpers, the ad hoc band of studio musicians cherished for their expertise in traditional country and western swing music. Franklin hit the big time at 16 playing on Gallery’s gold-winning pop single, “It’s So Nice To Be With You.” He migrated from Detroit to Nashville in 1972 to play steel for Barbara Mandrell. Since then, he has toured and/or recorded with Jerry Reed, Mel Tillis, Sting, Mark Knopfler, Shania Twain, George Strait, Barbra Streisand and Megadeth. He was 13 times the Academy of Country Music’s steel guitar player of the year.

Gill’s guitar and vocals grace more than 400 albums—in addition to his own. He’s won 20 Grammys, 18 Country Music Association Awards and is a member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Bakersfield is his first duet album.

It was playing with the Time Jumpers and hearing the crowds’ rapturous applause that led Gill to approach Franklin with the idea for this album. “The Time Jumpers are so good,” he says, “that you can call out any tune you want to play and everybody can play it. For some reason, I’d always call out ‘Holding Things Together’ or ‘Together Again’—two songs I’ve sung my whole life. When we do these songs, they’re show-stoppers. And when Paul finishes the solo on ‘Together Again,’ the whole club erupts. That’s heaven on earth. It's so much fun to play for people who are absolutely starved for what you’re doing.”
Gill had a very clear reason for choosing Franklin as a recording partner and co-producer. “I’m such a lover of the steel guitar,” he explains. “It’s my favorite instrument. It’s what’s so achingly beautiful about country music. Just as the sound of the banjo defines bluegrass, the sound of the steel guitar defines country music. So I talked to Paul and said, ‘Do you think it would be fun to do a record?’ I didn’t want to do an instrumental record. They never hold my attention for an entire record. I said, ‘How about if I sing, and then we just play those great old songs? We’ll have a blast.’ And he was up for it.”

Once they decided to walk the streets of Bakersfield, Gill says he isolated three songs he absolutely had to have on the album. “Deal breakers,” he called them. They were “Holding Things Together,” “Together Again” and “I Can’t Be Myself With You.” Fortunately, they were among Franklin’s favorites, as well. But finding Owens and Haggard songs they both loved was the easy part. Narrowing down the list to five each was hard. “We could have done 500 and 500,” Gill says. “What was fun for me was finding two great Buck songs I didn’t know—‘He Don’t Deserve You Anymore’ and ‘But I Do.’” They made the cut, too.
From the outset, Gill and Franklin agreed they wouldn’t record sound-alike versions.

“The album is very much borrowed from and inspired by the originals,” Gill says, “but it’s done in our own way—the way we chose to play and sing it. There was no point in doing a note-for-note.” Both men assumed Don Rich had provided the harmony vocals on the Owens’ songs they picked, because of seeing him sing on Buck’s early tv shows, but WSM-AM disc jockey and country music historian Eddie Stubbs informed them that Owens sang his own harmonies on the early records. And that’s what Gill did. On four of the Haggard songs, however, Time Jumper Dawn Sears, and Gill, sang harmony.

Gill and Franklin tracked the album in two days at Gill’s home studio, backed by a “killer band” made up of John Hobbs, piano; Greg Morrow, drums; Willie Weeks and Brad Albin, bass; J. T. Corenflos, electric rhythm guitar; and Time Jumpers Kenny Sears, Larry Franklin and Joe Spivey, fiddles. Gill played all the acoustic and electric guitar fills and solos.
“So, this is just as much a guitar record for me,” Gill says, “as it is a singing record. But it was fun for me to sing a whole record of the greatest songs ever. I guess what I’m real proud of is that when it’s one of Buck’s songs, I sing it very much in that vein. And the Haggard songs are very much in the vein he sang. With Buck’s songs, you won’t find much vibrato in my vocals, and with Merle’s, it will come down to a low note and that quiver.”

Gill and Franklin go to some length in Bakersfield to honor certain pickers who backed Owens and Haggard early in their careers. Among these were stellar guitarists James Burton, Roy Nichols, Don Rich, Reggie Young, Buck, Merle, and fabled steel players Ralph Mooney, Tom Brumley, Norm Hamlet and J.D. Maness. “Years ago,” Franklin says, “there was a Burton and Mooney album [called Corn Pickin’ and Slick Slidin] that was all instrumental. But you could hear the ‘conversation’ between them as they played. We wanted to maintain that same kind of conversation between the guitar and steel on our record.”

“I was obviously looking for what would suit the steel guitar,” Gill adds. “That was the whole impetus behind all the songs we chose to do—that and some of the chicken pickin’ kind of guitar stuff James Burton did so much on Merle’s records.”

Although he’s spent much of his career in the spotlight, Gill insists his greatest joy is in being a sideman. “The only reason any of us learned to play was to collaborate and play with someone else. It’s not much fun by yourself. This record has been a great experience for me—to go back and honor the things that I hold dearest.”

“This may be Vince’s greatest project,” Franklin declares. “What a showcase! I’ve heard him sing for 30 years, but he sings licks on this record I never heard before.”

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Improve This Page

If you’re the artist, you can update your biography, photos, videos, and more at Artist Central.

Get started at Artist Central

Feedback

Check out our Artist Stores FAQ
Send us feedback about this page