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Virgil: Eclogues. Georgics. Aeneid: Books 1-6 (Loeb Classical Library) Hardcover – January 31, 1916


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Virgil: Eclogues. Georgics. Aeneid: Books 1-6 (Loeb Classical Library) + Virgil, Volume II : Aeneid Books 7-12, Appendix Vergiliana (Loeb Classical Library, No 64) + Caesar: The Gallic War (Loeb Classical Library)
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Product Details

  • Series: Loeb Classical Library (Book 63)
  • Hardcover: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press; Revised edition (January 31, 1916)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 067499583X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674995833
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 4.6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #406,583 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, Latin (translation)
Original Language: Latin

About the Author

At the time of his death G. P. Goold was William Lampson Professor Emeritus of Latin Language and Literature, Yale University, and Editor Emeritus of the Loeb Classical Library®.

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Customer Reviews

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See all 7 customer reviews
The explanatory notes are a useful feature.
Mr. Jeffrey N. Keddie
Despite these, the Aeneid remains a masterpiece, and the Loeb editions will remain standards for academic scholarship for some time to come.
FrKurt Messick
I am a Latin student and this book is really great for using to translate.
hannah

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

68 of 74 people found the following review helpful By John Ingle on April 22, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Just for those who have never seen a Loeb-it has the original Latin (or Greek) on one side with the translation on the following page. The Loeb series are known for their excellent translations and are vital to any researcher or historian who wants to return to the orginal for their primary source. Virgil's Georgics alone make this book a necessity (the Georgics used to be standard reading before and after the revolution in universities) and the Aeneid provides an excellent balance to the Eclouges and the Georgics. Virgil's writings are fairly simple yet convey both the message and the image of what he wishes to get across to the reader. The Loeb series are a bit more pricey than the Penguin translations but the added luxury of the Latin text make this series indispensable to the student or reseacher of Rome or the Latin language.
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37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By "wumouse" on July 23, 2003
Format: Hardcover
As a student preparing for the "AP Latin: Vergil" exam largely on my own, I can say from experience that this book is a great tool for students, regardless of the intensity at which you are studying Vergil.
Unlike the Mandelbaum or Fitzgerald translations, the Loeb is very literal, which helped me to see how the words fit together syntactically. A page of Latin text faces its translation, and it is easy to look back and forth to understand the translation. Because there are no vocabulary words or footnotes, the Loeb cannot be used alone by a student first learning Vergil. However, used in conjunction with the Boyd or Pharr edition of the Aeneid, it is a wonderful help.
Whether to help with translation or to study for tests, I highly recommend the Loeb. Because the Latin is on a page by itself with the English translation facing it, students can translate without any help whenever they are ready, making the Loeb a uniquely flexible aid to studying Vergil.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on July 28, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Roman society was enamoured of Greek culture -- many of the best 'Roman' things were Greek; the major gods were derivative of the Greek pantheon; philosophy, literature, science, political ideals, architecture -- all this was adopted from the Greeks. It makes sense that, at the point of their ascendancy in the world, they would long for an epic history similar to the Homeric legends; the Iliad and the Odyssey, written some 500 years after the actual events they depict, tell of the heroism of the Greeks in their battle against Troy (Ilium). The Aeneid, written by Vergil 700 years after Homer, at the commission of Augustus (himself in the process of consolidating his authority over Rome), turns the heroic victory of the much-admired Greeks on its head by postulating a survivor from Troy, Aeneas, who undergoes as journey akin to the Odyssey, even further afield.

Vergil constructs Aeneas, a very minor character in the Iliad, as the princely survivor and pilgrim from Troy, on a journey through the Mediterranean in search of a new home. According to Fitzgerald, who wrote a brief postscript to the poem, Vergil created a Homeric hero set in a Homeric age, purposefully following the Iliad and Odyssey as if they were formula, in the way that many a Hollywood director follows the formulaic pattern of past successful films. Vergil did not create the Trojan legend of Roman origins, but his poem solidified the notion in popular and scholarly sentiment.

Vergil sets the seeds for future animosity between Carthage and Rome in the Aeneid, too -- the curse of queen Dido on the descendants of Aeneas of never-ending strife played into then-recent recollections of war in the Roman mind.
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31 of 39 people found the following review helpful By K. Howe on August 10, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Don't get me wrong, the translation is fine, but if you're looking for a verse translation of the Eclogues, the Georgics, or the Aeneid, look elsewhere. Unfortunately, I had to purchase the item without knowing whether it was verse or prose, since none of the reviews indicates that it is, in fact, prose. I suppose I can't have too much Virgil, but it's nice to know ahead of time, right? Well, now all the other people in the world looking for a verse translation of Virgil's works (all twenty of them, right?) will know that this isn't what they want.
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