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Virtual Worlds: Rewiring Your Emotional Future Paperback – April 30, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Myers Publishing LLC (April 30, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0979388716
  • ISBN-13: 978-0979388712
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.8 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,604,185 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jack Myers is editor and publisher of Jack Myers Media Business Report, www.JackMyers.com and www.MediaVillage.com, the online community for intelligent TV fans. He was identified as one of the "1,000 Most Creative Individuals in the U.S" by Who's Really Who and is the recipient of the George Foster Peabody Award, won the Crystal Heart Award from the Heartland Film Festival, and has been nominated for both an Academy and Emmy Award. Myers has consulted with more than 200 leading media companies, agencies and major global marketers on media and marketing trends. The Myers Emotional Connections Research Studies, launched in 1999, have emerged as state-of-the art standards for measuring audiences' emotional connections with media. He is a Board Member of the Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse University, serves on the Dean's Advisory Board for the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development at New York University, is a member of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, and serves on the boards of several charitable organizations.

More About the Author

Jack's new book, Hooked Up: A New Generation's Surprising Take on Sex, Politics and Saving the World, shares insights into the first generation to grow up with the Internet and how they are likely to impact business, culture and society. Jack is a media ecologist and chairman of Media Advisory Group, which provides economic counsel to more than 250 media, advertising, marketing, entertainment and financial services companies who subscribe to the weekly Jack Myers Media Business Report. Jack speaks internationally on the impact of emerging media technologies on society, culture and business. He is an award-winning documentary film producer, author of four books and founder of the Women in Media Mentoring Initiative and Syracuse University Newhouse Network. Jack is the recipient of the George Foster Peabody Award, won the Crystal Heart Award from the Heartland Film Festival, and has been nominated for both an Academy and Emmy Award for Best Documentary Feature for Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream. His most recent production is the Focus Forward documentary series with Morgan Spurlock's Cinelan Group, underwritten by GE.

His 1998 book, Reconnecting with Customers: Building Brands and Profits in The Relationship Age, is recognized as a leading edge primer that anticipated today's dramatic digital transformation. Virtual Worlds: Rewiring Your Emotional Future, published in 2007, focuses on the growing influence of social networks on young people. He began his career in sales and management positions at Metromedia Outdoor, ABC Radio and CBS Television, While in college, he co-founded the Syracuse New Times. Jack is a Board Member Emeritus of the Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse University. He served on the Advisory Board for the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development at New York University. He studied Media Ecology with Dr. Neil Postman at NYU and Radio-TV at Syracuse University.

Customer Reviews

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See all 7 customer reviews
These are dangerous questions, which usually means that they are good questions.
Taran Rampersad
More of a philosophical discourse than an essay, Myers book manages to engage the reader in a very provocative dialectic without the reader initially realizing such.
Vic G. Sarjoo
It allows the reader ro understand how thoughts and emotions interact, and their importance in motivating, impeding or re-directing basic decision-making.
Kenneth Marks

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Taran Rampersad on May 18, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Virtual World. Emotion. Why do these two words seem so separate? Is it because the technology masks our emotions with a gilded frame of ones and zeros? Is it that we are surrounded by technology so much that we forget our own humanity? Is it as Thoreau said, that men have become the tools of their tools? Or is it instead that humanity is offering more of itself into the technology that it creates? Deep questions which are not often approached, and when they are approached they are not often approached wisely. What is an 'emotional future', and do I want one? Do I have a choice? People get uncomfortable with such questions. These are dangerous questions, which usually means that they are good questions.

Of course, I got a gold paper clip with the book. This was somewhat of a novelty for me, and also gave me pause.

When I looked at the cover of this book, these were things that I thought about a bit. I wasn't sure what to expect. Two blurry avatars kissing on the cover of the book hint at romance, a topic that I cannot comment on beyond half a life's sojourns. What is this about?

So, I read the book.

The book was a quick read. It was well written and, more importantly, easy to read. The large text hints that this is bifocal friendly, but what this reader liked was that it was just plain easy to read. So often books fail in the mechanics department by not catering to their business properly, and I was pleased and even encouraged to read this book after glancing in its covers. Large text is encouraging; it is the promise that the book is thinner than it looks - and it is fairly thin.

The reader takes a journey into the concept of a virtual world - but not through the technical explanations.
Read more ›
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kenneth Marks on June 6, 2007
Format: Paperback
Jack Myers quickly sets the stage to introduce the growing impact and cultural acceptance of living in a "virtual world" through the Internet. He allows the reader to see this phenomenon as a new society in formation. It's a little scary, yet thrilling as he describes its impact on today's lifestyles looking into the future.

I believe the book's description of the influence and interdependence of the brain, the heart, and the gut in all humans is brilliant! It allows the reader ro understand how thoughts and emotions interact, and their importance in motivating, impeding or re-directing basic decision-making.

Once again, Myers proves his uncanny ability at blazing trails all of us need to follow, through this small but powerful book.

Kenneth Marks

Principal

Kenneth L. Marks Consulting

Del Mar, Ca.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By F. Lara on September 17, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found the book a bit superficial. There book is based in one argument: western culture favors rationality and represses emotions and gut feelings. This repression makes our lives unbalanced and repressed. Virtual worlds liberate us by allowing us to act on our emotions and gut feelings not our reason. I think there is something to this argument; our lives are unbalanced and repressed, but it is not that simple. It is just not true that western society represses emotions over reason as you can tell by watching any tv commercial and any political campaign where everything is about making you feel right, not about thinking or using your reason.
This only idea in the book is acompannied by a lot of blah, blah, blah, and a lot of pictures from Second Life. However the book is unexpensive, and an easy and quick read, so if you want to hear a little more about second life, and have a few dollars and a couple of hours to spare, this might be your book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Daniel W. Derrick on August 24, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm not sure what the other reviewers think is "well written" but this is not my idea. The book seems to contain a series of blogs that Jack Myers had written on his [...] web site. I'm not sure what the second author did because fact checking was not one of them. The author cites E. Castronova's work in the field of synthetic reality but says E.C. is from the University of Indiana. "Indiana University" is, I'm just guessing here, world known. There is no University of Indiana.
About parents needing this to help their kids. "Hey parents and kids, don't ever provide your password to anyone making a request. Period." That's the one message useful in this book. And hey Bluebird, sorry, your mom doesn't know how to prevent being Internet roadkill any more than you do.
Going to [...] and [...] and reading about the sites will be much better use of time and money.
Oh, I forgot: Jack lets you know that many of his interviews are "exclusive."
This book has 150 pages. Once you consider the pictures of SecondLife and the large text, it might be about 78 pages.
Some self-published books really are OK. Just not this one.
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