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Visions in Death Hardcover – August 3, 2004

213 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Though not as gripping as the previous installments in Robb's mid–21st-century In Death series (Remember When, etc.), this new offering showcases her many talents. New York policewoman Eve Dallas is on the trail of a serial killer who strangles his young female victims with a red ribbon and removes their eyes postmortem. Dallas and her longtime partner, Detective Peabody, pursue the criminal with wisecracking vigor and old-fashioned police work, assisted as well by Eve's handsome husband, billionaire businessman Roarke, and a beautiful psychic who volunteers to share her chilling visions of the murders. Naturally, the determined Dallas gets her man, though her toughness is shaken along the way by memories of her own childhood abuse, the murderer's vicious attack on Peabody and a surprising 11th-hour revelation. The Thomas Harrisesque mystery resolves rather simply, and the story gets less of an energy boost than usual from the romantic power play between Eve and Roarke and the edgy sci-fi detail that made the earlier books so distinctive. (In fact, the Manhattan of 2059 is oddly old-fashioned, with more homey crafts stores than the New York of 2004.) Nevertheless, the book is a sassy, smart-alecky read, possessing the warm characterizations and witty dialogue that have earned Robb/Roberts her huge and loyal readership.
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Review

"Intensely female yet unfeminine in any traditional sense, Dallas has a complex edge that transcends genre stereotypes."
-- Publishers Weekly (Publisher's Weekly ) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Series: In Death
  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Putnam Adult; 1st edition (August 3, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399151710
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399151712
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.2 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (213 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #197,925 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

J.D. Robb is the pseudonym for a number-one New York Times-bestselling author of more than 170 novels, including the futuristic suspense In Death series. There are more than 300 million copies of her books in print.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Sebastian Fernandez VINE VOICE on April 16, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Nora Roberts, writing as J.D. Robb, has created a successful series based on a few basic principles. The first, and in my opinion, most important aspect is a fascinating heroine, who presents different layers that the author has been revealing in each installment and will certainly continue to do so. Lieutenant Eve Dallas is a tough cop, who is relentless in her pursue of justice and feels as if the victims were hers to save. On the other hand, she is the wife of the billionaire Roarke, and has to deal with parties and charity events in which she is expected to mingle and maintain polite chit-chat with the guests. She has been adjusting slowly to this area of her life and even though she does not like it, she has learned to accept it. The fact that Eve was abused by her father when she was a child and had to kill him in order to escape also plays an important role in the development of the story and in almost every case Eve faces. Her husband also has a complex past, involving an abusing father who killed Roarke's mother and then lied to him about who his real mother was. Only recently did the billionaire learned the truth about this and reunited with what was left of his family.

Besides the two main characters, Robb has created a supporting cast that adds appeal to the series and which I consider to be the second factor in its success. Peabody is Eve's former aide and current partner who has recently made detective and who usually adds a good part of humor to the narration with her witty comments. She is in love with McNabb, a policeman working in the Electronic Detectives Division, and they are in the process of moving together to a new apartment.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A. J Thompson on November 27, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Homicide detective Eve Dallas is hesitant to deal with a registered psychic, even one that comes with her credentials verified from a trusted friend. Celina Sanchez is a private consultant to the wealthy with personal problems and isn't at all used to having visions of a serial killer in action. Eve isn't convinced that hiring Sanchez as a consultant will be worth the money, but she will take all and any offers of help.

The public would be mightily freaked out if they knew all the details of the latest killing in the park. The removal of the eyes, for instance. Is the killer seeking recognition or are the victims more personal targets? There's a man out there with serious problems with the fairer sex, and Eve is convinced that the way to flush him out is to present him publicly with the faces of his hunters - all women.

This great future police series starring New York police lieutenant Eve Dallas has been right up there in the best seller's list for the 18 books prior to "Visions in Death". There had to be a flat one eventually, and this is it. The series may at last be running out of puff as there isn't anything new to offer in this latest installment in the life and times of the snarly but brilliant Eve and her too perfect husband, Roarke.

All the usual suspects feature with all their familiar and lovable quirks, but this novel is really only a time passer. Still a good book, but compared its predecessors, "Visions in Death" is only average. Good twist there at the end but it seems more of an afterthought in a rather pedestrian plot, saved by its characters and the updates for what's going on in their relationships. Is there an end in sight for this series? This book would seem to indicate we are due for the big wind up.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Emma on August 26, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I loved Divided in Death because of the focus on the relationship between Eve and Roarke so intensely. As far as literary couples go, they are up there near the top and even after 19 books, they've still got it. BUT... you didn't see enough of the interaction between them that makes them so special in Visions in Death.

There's a serial killer on the loose, Eve is on the case, works herself to exhaustion, and, in contrast to her past behavior, begins to open up to her friends about her horrible childhood abuse. I know some get tired of Eve's abuse storyline but frankly, it would be far worse if Robb simply had Eve get over something so terribly traumatic. I like that she's slowly working through it.

The mystery was good, Robb adds a psychic to the mix for something new. Not enough Feeney and McNab for me but the storyline was good and kept me interested. There was a great twist at the end that I really didn't see coming, which was nice.

Overall, another enjoyable addition to the series but I did miss all of the elements that make Eve so interesting, her interaction with the people in her life. We got only brief glimpses of them this time around and I hope that we'll get more in the next installment.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Discord on September 8, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Since discovering J.D. Robb's books two years back, I've read them all and enjoyed every one. I'll admit that the latest offering is a bit tame in comparison to her earlier books. But I say isn't it time now for Eve to soften up a bit (I still like the kick arse attitude though).

She's gone through so much trauma as a child, survived with a 'Bite Me' attitude and trusted very few. Now after so many books and forming links with so many friends - yes, she's beginning to understand the concept of friendship and trust, - it's believable that she would grow as a person and change/mature.

As Dr. Mira wisely states, at the speed Eve was going, burn out was two years away, before she met Roark, Peabody and the extended family. Now, we readers can reap the rewards also. A change of pace leaves room for diversity in plot, cause face it, sooner or later we would tire of 1+2 always equalling 3.

Eve is still going to be driven to stand for the dead, it's a part of the character, but it's nice to see her looking around and beginning to understand that there's more to her life than being a 'good cop'.

If Eve Dallas's character had no room for growth/change then what we'll soon end up with is an "R" rated Nancy Drew series.
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