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  • Vixen Optics 35505 Polarie Star Tracker
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Vixen Optics 35505 Polarie Star Tracker

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List Price: $399.00
Price: $389.00 and eligible for FREE Two-Day Shipping Details
You Save: $10.00 (3%)
Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).
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  • Use Polarie with Your Digital Camera
  • No Astronomy experience necessary
  • Take Star Scape images at night
  • Lightweight and compact
4 new from $389.00

Frequently Bought Together

Vixen Optics 35505 Polarie Star Tracker + Manfrotto 088LBP Adapter 1/4-Inch- 20 to 3/8-Inch with flange
Price for both: $400.00

Buy the selected items together



Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 3.7 x 2.3 x 5.9 inches ; 1.4 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: This item is also available for shipping to select countries outside the U.S.
  • ASIN: B006ZSRHKC
  • Item model number: 35505
  • Batteries 2 AA batteries required.
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: January 1, 2012

Product Description

This compact mount platform allows you to capture night scapes and star images with ease. Set up is simple. The Polarie attaches to a standard camera tripod and can accept any digital camera weighing up to 3.5lbs. Using the included compass on the Polarie, orient the mount to face north. The Polarie features a North Star alignment window that you point at Polaris. The Polarie can also use a polar scope for alignment. Once set, the Polarie tracks with the motion of the stars to eliminate "star trailing" on your images resulting in sharp images of the Universe. The Polarie uses very accurate stepping motors and operates on 2 "AA" batteries. Polarie is designed to not only be functional, but also to be compact and attractive. The Polarie has a smooth, good looking design. The unit has no visible screws and although, not waterproof, it is designed to function in most weather conditions.

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
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11
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See all 11 customer reviews
Manfrotto makes one for around ten bucks.
Justin Bogley
You'll need a heavy tripod with a heavy-duty head to mount the Polarie and a good ball head to mount the camera to the Polarie.
Tom H Texas
With the Polar scope I can take amazing Milky way shots.
Steve T.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Justin Bogley on May 19, 2012
I've always looked at magazine photos of nebulae, galaxies, etc., and always thought that realm of photography was off limits except for people with a lot of money and a lot of technical knowledge about astronomy. Every time I looked online to research equatorial mounts and all the other gadgets to take good stills of outer space, I would end up intimidated both by the price and the complicated looking setups. Then I found the Vixen Polarie.
Simplicity and quality were what I was looking for all along, and it finally seemed as though Vixen had nailed it. I ordered it, (actually I hinted to my wife emphatically that I wanted it for my birthday - she's quite wonderful) and when I opened the package, I could immediately tell it was a quality product. It feels heavy in your hands, as the case is all metal, aside from the battery cover, which is plastic. The camera mount is machined aluminum with a very nice spring loaded camera ballhead mount. (More on that later) There is a mini USB port at the bottom of the battery cover for powering through your laptop as an option instead of using 2 - AA batteries. The dial for the different modes on the top feels very solid and has satisfying clicks between modes. The compass, which is screwed directly into the opposite side from the camera head mount also seems like a quality instrument. But could it really allow me to take good photos of deep-space objects?
First off, the Polarie is advertised as a wide-field mount, which to me, sounds at first like it isn't accurate enough to take good photos of individual globular clusters and planetary nebulae. Plus the fact that it's advertised as having a payload of only 4.4 lbs renders it unable to manage most long lenses along with a good slr and a ballhead.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Tom H Texas on June 21, 2012
Verified Purchase
I've been looking for an inexpensive star tracker to do night landscapes and DSLR astrophotography, but until now, the units cost too much or were too complicated. Mounting my DSLR on my telescope caused balance problems and was not really suited to landscapes anyway. Friends have used other systems, but the ones I saw were larger and more complicated.

You'll need a heavy tripod with a heavy-duty head to mount the Polarie and a good ball head to mount the camera to the Polarie. My ball head had a round QR plates, which proved impractical (camera spins), so I had to order another one with a Manfroto QR plate to match the rest of my tripods.

Using the Polarie couldn't be simpler - Aim the peephole at Polaris, mount and aim the camera at your target, set the spin rate, and snap away. I haven't had a chance to try it, but the 1/2 speed spin rate is intriguing as it allows you to open the shutter longer than the full rate while still capturing the landscape.

The only down side is the life of the AA batteries. If you're lucky, you'll get about 1.5 hours out of it. However, I have an external USB battery pack that greatly extends the run time. Nearly any USB battery pack would work or you could use your laptop or netbook, too.

My wide-angle test shots were great and I hope to experiment more this weekend. At this point, I'm very happy and would recommend it to my friends.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By RK on August 2, 2013
Verified Purchase
I have to admit I was a little intimidated at the thought of buying something that seemed beyond my experience. Well let me tell you I was getting usable photos with no star trails on my first try! Do your homework before taking the plunge. The review by Justin Bogley helped immensely. I ordered the Manfrotto 088LBP Adapter 1/4-Inch- 20 to 3/8-Inch with flange as per Justin's recommendation and I was glad I did. I leave the adapter on the Polarie all the time. I was lucky enough to have a spare ballhead that I use with a monopod and now I easily switch from the monopod to the Polarie. I have been lucky also with finding Polaris (the North star) rather easily. First find your coordinates where you live (do a Google search). My coordinates are 40.7419° N. First level the Polarie, set the compass that comes with the Polarie on top of the unit, point due North. Then set your coordinates via the side of the Polarie, just tilt the unit as per your coordinates. I could not believe it but both nights as I set the unit as per the instructions Polaris was right in the middle of the view finder! (I still think this might be beginners luck). I have done 90 seconds to two minutes exposures (5-10 frames) and they have been tack sharp. I have been using ISO 800-1000 f2.8 with a 45mm tilt shift lens and a 50mm. Do not think you are just going to pop the photos in your computer and have the 'wow' photos you have seen on the web. You have to have a pretty good knowledge of Photoshop. I set the black, white and grey balance via a Curve layer. As I said do your homework on your computer and be a little prepared. This was a purchase I would definitely make again and I look forward to more night photography!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dawn J. on February 21, 2013
Having had the AstroTrac tracker previously and selling it because of its finicky nature, I wasn't expecting much from the Polarie.

But I have been overwhelmingly happy with it on the first two nights out with it for two reasons. Ease of alignment WITHOUT the polar scope, and the ability to power it with two AA batteries. The AstroTrac, while finely engineered and built is VERY finicky to properly align.

Literally within 10 minutes of getting to my spot for the night, I was able to take a 2 minute + exposure with the Polarie (18mm wide-field shots, but the speed and ease with which I was able to align was unbelievable.)

If you're looking for a truly portable solution for SLR astrophotography, with wide to medium telephoto lens, I think the Polarie is the clear winner here. You might get more weight bearing capability with the AstroTrac, but if your intention is to use only SLR camera and lenses then look no further than the Vixen. Excellent product and an excellent price.

Best regards,
Barry J
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