Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $8.22
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Vogue® Knitting Stitchionary® Volume Five: Lace Knitting: The Ultimate Stitch Dictionary from the Editors of Vogue® Knitting Magazine (Vogue Knitting Stitchionary Series) Hardcover – June 1, 2010


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$134.93 $67.43

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Vogue Knitting Stitchionary Series (Book 5)
  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Sixth&Spring Books; 1 edition (June 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1933027932
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933027937
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 11.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #931,654 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Important Information

Ingredients
Example Ingredients

Directions
Example Directions

More About the Author

First published in 1932, then relaunched in 1982, Vogue Knitting have been the most trusted authority on fashion knitting, delivering expert information about knitting techniques, an insider's take on the latest trends and happenings in the knitting world and up-to-the-minute designs from the top names both in the hand-knitting industry and on Seventh Avenue. The best-selling Vogue Knitting: The Ultimate Knitting Book has been the go-to reference for over 20 years, and volumes such as Vogue Knitting Shawls & Wraps, Vogue Knitting: The Ultimate Sock Book, and Vogue Knitting Very Easy Sweaters, have distilled their expertise for knitters of all skill levels.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

87 of 94 people found the following review helpful By Lynne E. TOP 100 REVIEWER on May 31, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you already own the previous four volumes in the STITCHIONARY series, you may want to purchase VOGUE KNITTING STITCHIONARY VOLUME FIVE: LACE KNITTING to complete your set. However, VOLUME FIVE is nothing more than a rather unwieldy coffee-table-book collection of "more than 150" lace stitch patterns "taken from the pages of Vogue Knitting magazine."

The patterns are organized into general categories: easy/mesh, edgings, chevrons, allover, panels, combos, and motifs. However, the "lace knitting" title is misleading, because there is no instructional material on (1) combining lace stitch patterns into garments, shawls, or stoles; (2) selecting patterns that are appropriate for different kinds of projects; (3) attaching edgings; or (4) understanding or using the charts and written-out instructions.

There is one page of instructions for yarnovers (illustrated with line drawings). This page appears to be taken from the publisher's very good general reference book, VOGUE KNITTING. There is also a short glossary of knitting terms used in the book. For each stitch pattern, there is a beautiful, enlarged, color photo of a swatch knitted in the pattern. The selection of patterns is somewhat random, because VK magazine is the pattern source, but many basic lace patterns are included. There are also quite a few complicated "designer" patterns (evidently created for specific patterns published in the magazine) that may be of limited practical value to knitters seeking ideas for lace items of their own design.

Many other stitch dictionaries are currently available that provide more patterns, and therefore offer better value (e.g., the Mon Tricot stitch dictionaries, the Barbara Walker stitch treasuries, the Lesley Stanfield stitch treasuries).
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
50 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Grace Shanahan on June 1, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Vogue say: "The newest volume in Vogue Knitting's must have series"
Is it a must have? That's for you to decide. Perhaps this review will help you to make a decision.
The introduction makes clear the distinction between lace knitting and knitting lace. It's all about whether you yarn over on one side of the work or both. When you yarn over on both sides of the work, you are knitting lace.
The latest is in the "Stitchionary" series contains lots of practical information on knitting lace. There are full page descriptions of abbreviations, Yarn Overs, and a glossary.
And while yes, Vogue does not use the lace symbols we are used to, the symbols it does use are actually clearer. Instead of the usual backward and forward slash for K2 tog and SSK, the symbols used has a little dash under the slash. So instead of relying on an aging brain to remember which way the slash is leaning, you can much easier see the direction in which the slash is leaning.
The glossary is definitely up to Vogue's standards of excellence. I especially like the Technique Tutorial on Yarn Overs. Most of the time I manage to execute whatever the pattern demands, but Vogue describes and illustrates what Yarn Overs look like: between two knit stitches, between two purl stitches, between a knit and a purl stitch, between a purl and a knit stitch, at the beginning of a knit row, at the beginning of a purl row, multiple YOs and etc. In other words, they explain every instance in which one might encounter a yarn over.
The photography of the stitch samples is superlative. In fact, at first glance, I actually thought there was white knitting yarn threaded through the yarn overs. That's how crystal clear the illustrations are!
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
108 of 124 people found the following review helpful By Leslie Severance on May 11, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I just received this book and am disappointed. Here are the reasons:

A. It doesn't look like they used lace yarn! Or else the patterns were knit at too tight a gauge.

B. It also doesn't look like they blocked the samples hard enough to open up the patterns. (See pattern 47, "Wave Rider." The points should look like mesh and be all full of holes but they look solid.)

C. Some of the yarn used is rather pale, so the patterns (the holes) don't show up well.

D. A large number of the patterns look like they took some textured patterns and threw in some yo's and called it "lace."

E. This is a personal thing - I don't like the symbols they used for K2T and SSK; the extra little leg coming down makes the charts look "busy." I prefer a simple / or \. Again, strictly a personal thing.

I'll have to judge the patterns by the charts provided, instead of looking at the pictures. Not easy to do. Maybe after I've scrutinized the charts I'll find a pattern or two that intrigue me.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Chris Reeske on June 16, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A good book for someone who has very little in the way of lace stitch dictionaries. Nothing really different or new by way of stitches, but the directions are easy to read. The biggest draw back was that some of the samples were knitted in a very dark blue and it is hard to see the stitch definition, which is important in a work of this kind.
If you are interested in stitches, go to Barbara Walker's books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By janvier25 on October 8, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I own the first three Stitchionaries and go to the first two fairly often (#3 - meh). A volume about lace should have used laceweight yarn, well blocked - even though I never knit in laceweight, it would have shown the patterns better. Between the yarn weight and the pale blue of some sections, it's hard to tell some patterns are even lace. As with the other Vogue Stitcionaries, there is no photo of the reverse side. The only pattern that grabbed me that I haven't seen elsewhere was #133, Reversible Frost Flowers. There is little or no garter lace, which makes scarves and shawls reversible. There are no top down edgings for those of us who knit sweaters top down, which is becoming increasingly popular.

If you work from written patterns and not charts, get Barbara Walker's Second Treasury or the Harmony Guide's Ultimate Sourcebook of Knitting and Crochet Stitches instead. The Reader's Digest Guide has charts only, if you prefer charts. I'd rather chart written patterns myself (and do) than buy this book. I'm giving three stars for the charts - I wish the earlier Stitchionaries had them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews