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Voice Over: The Making of Black Radio Paperback – December 18, 1998

ISBN-13: 978-1566396677 ISBN-10: 1566396670

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Voice Over: The Making of Black Radio + Third Coast: OutKast, Timbaland, and How Hip-Hop Became a Southern Thing + Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 334 pages
  • Publisher: Temple University Press (December 18, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1566396670
  • ISBN-13: 978-1566396677
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,226,593 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

With panache, Barlow showcases the evolution of black radio from the early days when white disc jockeys negatively portrayed blacks to the contemporary scene, in which disc jockeys operate in corporate environments and blackface is a distant phenomenon. Barlow, an insider of black radio, having been the voice on WPFW in Washington, D.C., for many years, shares his perceptions of the ups and downs of the industry. And he covers black history in the medium from blackface to black-owned. Barlow makes the point that black music and black disc jockeys have played, and continue to play, a crucial role in the black community, even when the stations are not black owned. Black radio has traditionally been a community asset by advocating political and community empowerment as well as providing black musicians with a medium to showcase their talents. Barlow has taken a serious look at a facet of black life that is all too often taken for granted. This work is definitely a needed addition to historical African American collections. Lillian Lewis --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"The history of black radio, like the history of many black enterprises, starts with a fight simply to exist. That story takes up a good part of Voice Over, an extensive history that makes it clear this subject could fill a half-dozen books...Happily, nothing serves that kind of discussion as well as a sturdy foundation of history, and Voice Over tells its part of the story well." --New York Daily News "Media and cultural history at its best. Voice Over offers riveting accounts of the innovations, struggles, failures, and triumphs of black radio from its beginnings to the present. Barlow's unique perspective gives its personalities and institutions long-overdue credit for their pivotal role in changing the soundscape of American music and culture." --Herman Gray, author of Watching Race: Television and the Struggle for "Blackness" "In the first book-length study of Pacifica Radio, Lasar recounts the history of 'our nation's only independent nonprofit [radio] network.' ...Lasar concentrates on the conflicted early years of Pacifica's development...useful as a behind-the-scenes account of Pacifica's growing pains." --Publishers Weekly

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. W. George on April 4, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The Radio Organization mentioned in the book was listed incorrectly; it is NATRA and not NARTA. Jack Gibson was not the Program Director at WERD, Ken Knight was the Program Director at WERD when they went on the air. Also, the name changed from NARA to NATRA because the television employees suffered the same issues as the radio employees and wanted to share their sentiments and issues with the organization. The pictures in the book are very delightful and full of character. Other than the few errors mentioned above, the book is a good read.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A Great Book on The Foundation of Black Radio
A Good Reference need to Order one more for a friend.
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By Nate Harris on September 20, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book was excellent. Seller was true to his or her word when describing the product. Was very happy.
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