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Vol. 1: Singin' the Blues


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Audio CD, January 5, 1990
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$10.97 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by CD Warehouse 817 and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
listen  1. TrumbologyFrank Trumbauer & His Orchestra; featuring Bix Beiderbecke and Eddie Lang 2:59$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Clarinet MarmaladeBix Beiderbecke 3:12$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Singin' The BluesBix Beiderbecke 3:00$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Ostrich WalkFrankie Trumbauer and His Orchestra Feat. Bix Beiderbecke 3:05$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Riverboat ShuffleFrankie Trumbauer and His Orchestra Feat. Bix Beiderbecke 3:07$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  6. I'm Coming VirginiaBix Beiderbecke 3:09$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  7. Way Down Yonder In New OrleansFrankie Trumbauer and His Orchestra Feat. Bix Beiderbecke 2:49$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  8. For No Reason At All In CFrank Trumbauer; featuring Bix Beiderbecke and Eddie Lang 3:02$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  9. Three Blind Mice (Rhythmic Theme In Advanced Harmony)Bix Beiderbecke 3:00$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen10. Blue RiverFrankie Trumbauer and His Orchestra Feat. Bix Beiderbecke 3:16$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen11. There's A Cradle In Caroline!Frankie Trumbauer & His Orchestra; featuring Bix Beiderbecke and Eddie Lang 3:00$0.69  Buy MP3 
listen12. In A MistBix Beiderbecke 2:43$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen13. Wringin' And Twistin'Bix Beiderbecke 2:53$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen14. Humpty DumptyFrankie Trumbauer & His Orchestra; featuring Bix Beiderbecke and Eddie Lang 3:01$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen15. Krazy KatFrankie Trumbauer & His Orchestra; featuirng Bix Beiderbecke and Eddie Lang 3:00$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen16. (The) BaltimoreFrankie Trumbauer & His Orchestra; featuring Bix Beiderbecke and Eddie Lang 2:59$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen17. There Ain't No Land Like Dixieland To MeThe Broadway Bellhops; featuring Bix Beiderbecke and Frank Trumbauer 3:01$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen18. There's A Cradle In Caroline!The Broadway Bellhops; featuring Bix Beiderbecke and Frank Trumbauer 2:54$0.69  Buy MP3 
listen19. Just An Hour Of LoveBenny Meroff & His Orchestra; featuring Frankie Trumbauer's Augmented Orchestra 2:51$0.69  Buy MP3 
listen20. I'm Wonderin' WhoBenny Meroff & His Orchestra; featuring Frankie Trumbauer's Augmented Orchestra 2:49$0.99  Buy MP3 

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Vol. 1: Singin' the Blues + Red Hot Peppers Session
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (January 5, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sony
  • ASIN: B0000026WV
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #317,139 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Bix was the only jazz musician of the '20s whose improvising prowess could possibly be compared to Louis Armstrong, and these 1927 Okeh tracks are the source of his legend, with such showpieces as Singing the Blues; Clarinet Marmalade , and For No Reason at All in C .

Amazon.com

In jazz's childhood, Bix Beiderbecke was the only cornet player to rival Satchmo in terms of influence on other musicians and on the development of the genre. Armstrong's syncopated delivery, his blues shadings, his unique phrasing--in short, his swing--became, rightly so, the benchmark, the standard by which jazz improvisation was not only judged, but actually defined. In a way, Bix represented both a practical and symbolic alternative to Armstrong. Though he was completely self-taught and couldn't read music, Bix's tone was incredibly pure, full, and lush, and his style was cooler, more restrained (but not reserved), and more plaintive than Louis's hot, ebullient playing--even though his actual tone remained bright and his note choices forceful. All of these 20 cuts come from 1927, and many of them rank among the finest performances of that classic era nudged between Dixieland and swing. A key component of these successes is Frankie Trumbauer, a remarkably fluent and lyrical C-melody sax player who was Beiderbecke's close friend and musical kindred spirit. The septet cuts from February and May are uniformly excellent, but "Singin' the Blues" (featuring Eddie Lang's prominent single-string guitar support), "Riverboat Shuffle," "I'm Comin' Virginia," and "Way Down Yonder in New Orleans" are astonishing landmarks in jazz history. Also worth noting are two trio cuts featuring Beiderbecke on piano supporting Trumbauer and Lang, and "In a Mist (Bixology)," a Bix piano solo full of bold, unorthodox melodies, harmonies, and rhythms. --Marc Greilsamer

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
71%
4 star
18%
3 star
0%
2 star
12%
1 star
0%
See all 17 customer reviews
Bix Biedercke really shines in a talented group.
Paul Severson
This is a very good quality recording, with lots of clarity and detail, in my opinion.
palmetto
And if you're only getting ONE disc, definitely get Volume One.
Comic Online

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Thomoz on October 11, 2006
Format: Audio CD
One of the other reviews commented how this disc had no surface noise? Well, they're right. The noise reduction (sounds like an older analog process) removed enough of the upper frequencies that the label chose to add echo after the fact to cover up their handiwork. So, "Blue River" is a brilliant performance . . . but it appears here in mediocre sound. For my money, the best sounding set out there NOT on Mosaic is the 2-cd 'Jazz Tribune Vol 48' on RCA (a French release).

There is a WORSE sounding Beiderbecke cd out there, with Orrin Keepnews' name on it yet. BUT . . . that's another story.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By TeeBee on May 14, 2008
Format: Audio CD
In addition to being among the most influential and beautiful jazz sides ever recorded, the original Okeh 78s were exceptionally well-recorded for their day, as any collector lucky enough to own one will tell you. Digital remastering was in its early days when Columbia issued this and its companion Bix disc, and it shows; the sound is flat, with the brilliance of the highs all but gone. It's shameful that Sony/BMG, which now owns nearly EVERYTHING Bix recorded, including the Columbia and Victor Whiteman sides, has not done justice to Bix by releasing the beautiful boxed set that collectors worldwide would welcome. In the meantime, the best restorations thus far are the "Bix Restored" sets, and that's where you should begin if you have interest in Bix or the best of late 20s jazz in general.
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27 of 34 people found the following review helpful By daniel on January 12, 1999
Format: Audio CD
he really was a genius. his solo in 'singing the blues', and the climax of 'riverboat shuffle' are some of the most beautiful things i've ever heard, which is saying a lot. the absolutely pure sound that he got from the horn comes across clearly in these disc recordings.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Glenda T. Childress on August 27, 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
My teenage music passion was early jazz, and one LP I absolutely wore out (playing it on a portable player with the type of needle that looked like a sharpened pencil lead) was the George Avakian production The Bix Beiderbecke Story Volume 2: Bix and Tram. I still have it, but trying to listen to it is painful, given the pops and skips it accumulated during those thousands of playbacks.

I serendipitously discovered the availability of this album on CD, and when it came it was a moving experience to hear "Singin' the Blues" in all its remastered beauty. Recorded between February and September of 1927, this album offers a good overview of the Bix and Tram recordings, some of the best of Twenties jazz, from small ensemble "dixieland" jazz to some of the larger orchestral arrangements for occasions when the guys put on their tuxedos and played posh places.

The best of this album are the aforementioned "Singin' the Blues," with perhaps Bix's most famous solo, each note perfect and achingly beautiful, "I'm Coming Virginia," "Ostrick Walk," "Clarinet Marmalade," and "Riverboat Shuffle" which feature this group of virtuosos at the top of their form. Also included are two Bix, Tram, and Eddie cuts and "In A Mist." Although "Way Down Yonder in New Orleans," may seem a bit hackneyed at first hearing, it's important to remember that that is the case only because their style and arrangement has been copied by every dixieland group on the planet since.
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Howard M. Wiley Jr. on August 27, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Beiderbecke and Armstrong were the two giants of the horn in the '20s. Bix died too soon to have any great influence on other hornmen, but his music would live on in the "cool school" and "west coast" jazz of the '50s. His use of the whole tone scale, 9th and 13th notes and other improvisational skills would become part of the jazz scene in later years. This CD is a compilation of some of his greatest work. Singin the Blues and I'm Comin' Virginia are the first two jazz ballads recorded.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Comic Online on August 2, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Let me first say this... if you want to listen to Bix Beiderbecke's short stint with the Frankie Trumbauer Orchestra on CD, you have two choices: the JSP box set, and two Columbia CD's from the early '90s (this, and Volume 2) . The JSP set does give you more tracks, but all the essential tracks are available on the Columbia set too. A number of the tracks in the JSP set don't even have Bix on them.

So which option wins out? I own both sets, and have compared extensively. Risking the anger of the John R.T. Davies fans, i'll have to give the nod to the Columbia discs. Read on for the differences you will hear (if you want to hear them).

The JSP set. This was re-mastered from very clean 78s by one of the best musical restorers of the last 30 years. There is a nice heft to the music, with strong bass present. Dynamic range is pretty good, but a little lacking in the upper register. You can especially notice when someone takes a solo, it sounds like you have your hands slightly covering your ears, and loses some of that upper-end definition. Still, this definitely sounds better than one might think for very early electrical (microphone) recording.

The Columbia set. This was re-mastered from the original metal and glass parts from the Columbia vaults. While there is a bit less heft, and could use a hair more bass, this definitely offers the music cleaner and more transparent. You can really hear every solo very smoothly and cleanly. It's more transparent and crisp than the JSP set.

So, both sets have their ups and downs. The problem with the JSP set is that no matter how talented the late John RT Davies was, he could only do so much, as he didn't have access to the original masters. He had to use consumer-level 78's.
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