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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on October 2, 2011
The StormJacket is really just a nylon sleeve with elastic on each end and a toggle to keep it tight. Additionally, on the Pro model there is a velcro access section on the bottom through which you can attach the camera to a tripod, it might seem expensive at $50 but to protect a $700 camera and a $400 lens? If it works... well worth it!

I took my Nikon D5000 with a Sigma 10-20mm Ultra-Wide lens onto the Maid of the Mist... that's right, the boat that goes INTO the mists of the famous Horseshoe Falls at Niagara Falls! Not only was it misty from the falls (and we're talking mists that rise up hundreds of feet!) but it was also raining, and COLD! I was very apprehensive using the product, I had just purchased the lens, and my camera is near and dear to me!

I tightened the front around right behind the hood thread, after removing the hood, then put the hood back on (in use, not stored); I then left the back entirely loose so I could get my hands inside and also put my eye to the viewfinder.

The material kept the wind and water off my hands keeping them warm enough to function and my camera is none the worse for having experience this amazing trip!

Of course, the glass on the front of the lens got wet, so make sure to bring something to wipe it (frequently).

The only other thing to mention is that the StormJacket weighs virtually nothing, is super compact and the carry pouch has a nice clip to hang it off your belt loop or part of your bag or gear.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on March 3, 2012
My timelapse setups usually run for 3-4 hours, and most of the time I'm not immediately near it. It's best to set it up and leave it alone. That way stray light from a flashlight, doesn't ruin the shot. I have been looking for a replacement for the cheap rain covers that I have used in the past. The Storm Jacket is compact when folded up and has a bungee closure at each end.

The Storm Jacket Pro Model, which I have, also has a large velcro opening on the bottom. That way you can use it with a tripod, or on a dolly. I've used it on the Dynamic Perception Stage Zero dolly and it worked great. The Storm Jacket is well made and will keep dew, rain, snow and dust off of the camera. The large openings make it easy to get at the camera, but close down tight to keep the weather out. I will be using this a lot, and highly recommend it.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on April 28, 2010
Love this. I live in the Pacific NW and if I could only shoot when it is dry, well...let's just say it wouldn't be that often. Plus I found that the extra length (when smaller lenses are attached) allows me to easily see the display on the back since it's in the dark. It's convenient to carry and to use.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
I purchased this not only to keep my lens and camera dry, but also to help ward off the bright sun glare when trying to view a picture in the LED screen. Pop this jacket on over the camera and instant sun shield to let you view your pictures. Since it is a sturdy nylon material--I simply cut a slit in the bottom to slip a tripod through. It was also the perfect size for my largest lens. I also have plenty of room to negotiate the buttons of the camera and lens adjustments. Just be sure to measure your camera and lens to get the right size Storm Jacket--and do get one!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on November 16, 2011
This product is a good buy if you can spend a little more money than what the cheap plastic covers cost. I used this product at a outdoor soccer game when it was pouring outside. It worked great and kept my camera and lens dry. There is a opening at the bottom so that the camera can easily be mounted to a tripod or monopod. The front has a elastic pully to close tight around the lens and the back is open with enough overlap to still protect the camera and gives easy access to view the monitor or look in view finder. I still carry the plastic covers just incase anything ever happens to the Storm Jacket, that way I still have a backup. The plastic is not as reliable as the Storm Jacket because it doesnt take much to put a pin hole in the plastic material and get water damage on the camera. Look at it this way, yes you are spending a little more money then the plastic covers but look at what you are protecting. Can you afford to buy a camera all over again just because you didn't want to spend a small amount of money for a good cover.

Buy it if you want something more reliable than plastic and want to protect your camera.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on February 24, 2010
Great rain cover for DLSR with long lenses, able to use it fully extended or collapsed in on shorter lenses.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 5, 2012
This served me well in Alaskan summer rains. It is a bit awkward, but I am not sure that there is much that can be done about that. You can snug one open end around the front element of your lens and the other end envelopes your camera leaving the view finder or viewing screen visible. It is basically waterproof nylon. Darn sure better than a plastic bag and it compresses nicely into the integral case.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 23, 2013
Let me say up front that working in a steady rain with any kind of camera cover is a nuisance. Period. This camera cover is less of a nuisance than other options I have looked at. There is a draw string closure on the front that tightens up around your lens hood. There is another draw string closure on the back to see the camera's viewfinder. There is a Velcro closure on the bottom for your tripod. The material is thin enough that you can work many of the camera and lens controls right through the material from the outside. Or you can make the bottom Velcro opening larger and reach up through the opening so your right hand is inside the cover to work the camera.

I've used this cover in a steady rainy for extended periods of time and not a drop of water got on my camera or lens (with the exception of the part of the lens hood that extended just beyond the front drawstring).

When you are done, the cover folds up and goes in a small pouch that scrunches down so it take up very little room in your backpack/camera bag. Personally, I let the cover dry before putting it back in the pouch. I tie one of the drawstrings to my tripod, my backpack, or something else so I don't lose it before I get out of the rain and let it dry.

Be sure to get the right size. I highly recommend you go to the manufacturer's web site and read the information there so you camera cover is long enough for your camera body and the longest lens you intend to use with the cover.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 12, 2013
I've been wanting one of these for quite some time but all I've seen have been quite expensive unless you get the ones that look like a clear plastic bag to cook the turkey in. This one is reasonably priced, can be cinched at both ends to fit snug where you want and loose at the other end to get at the controls. It has a handy Velcro opening along the length of the bottom so you slip it over the camera and lens while it is on a mono or tripod while you are taking pictures. It worked like a charm the first time I used it in a torrential sideways down pour.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on November 7, 2012
I used this product at Niagra Falls on the maid of the mist and in the Cave of the Winds where you are literally inside the falls and it kept my camera dry as a bone.I used a nikon d90 with a 18-200 zoom and just cinched the cover around the lense hood and stuck my hand in the other end and cinched ith cover around it.
Be prepared to keep drying the lense face.It comes with a handy nylon case with a hook to attach to your camera strap.
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