Listen for $0.00 with
Join Amazon Prime now
Get unlimited, ad-free access to over a million songs and hundreds of playlists, free with Amazon Prime.

Vulgar Display Of Power (US Release) [Explicit]

February 21, 1992 | Format: MP3

$0.00
Join Amazon Prime to add this album to your library for FREE
$9.49 to buy
Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
3:57
30
2
3:57
30
3
5:15
30
4
2:48
30
5
6:33
30
6
4:36
30
7
4:49
30
8
5:00
30
9
5:27
30
10
4:40
30
11
5:45

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: February 21, 1992
  • Release Date: February 21, 1992
  • Label: Atlantic Records
  • Copyright: 1992 Atlantic Recording Corporation for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 52:47
  • Genres:
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • ASIN: B001O80G60
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (352 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,162 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

This is one of the best metal albums ever.
Baris Sarer
If you love metal ( or even kinda like it) YOU MUST BUY THIS ALBUM, I can't say enough it is just that damn good.
Marine1636@aol.com
In my own opinion, I think Pantera is the best Heavy Metal band of the 90's and late 80's.
Chisholm Lakota

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 79 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Alla Koholick on July 25, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Although I personally like Cowboys From Hell better, and Far Beyond Driven is heavier overall, Vulgar Display Of Power remains Pantera's greatest achievement. Influential, technical, catchy, heavy, and to a degree, intelligent.
Phil Anselmo, at one time, did write great lyrics. He covered everything: decay of society, racism, war, peace, self-respect, self-loathing, love, loss of a friend, anger towards parents, hatred, everything. "Hostile," for instance, is a song dealing with teen angst. However, there's no KoRny sludge here. It's a fast-paced romper-stomper that sounds more like an adolescent furiously making a point rather than a 12-year-old whining about not getting a dirt bike for Christmas. Phil's vocal range is good, too. He is mostly using the 'tough-guy' voice, occasionally singing with that amazing choirboy voice of his, and no longer screeching like Plant or Halford. The Abbott brothers, Diamond Darrell and Vinnie Paul, are amazing as usual. Dime's probably one of the best metal guitarists. His solos are never messy, always precise. Vinnie is pretty much the same. Insane double bass. It's not always fast, but precise. The foot-rhythms are nothing compared to the crushing groove of the hi-hat and snare, or the crazy fills. They're both great. Rex Brown fills in nicely with bass. Funky, groovy, and going just as fast as Vinnie and Dime. Truly the stuff of legend.
"Mouth For War" took this album to the top of the pop charts, with its barreling main riff and the unforgettable opening line--"Revenge! I'm screaming revenge again!" "Walk" is a simple, anthemic, Texas-styled metal song, with a great chorus, and even better solo. "Hostile" is a pile driver, "Rise" even faster, with a great riff later stolen by Helmet.
Read more ›
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
154 of 183 people found the following review helpful By Ensio N Mikkola on December 18, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Usually I don't waste my time responding to the idiots who post inflammatory reviews to get noticed but on the off-chance that said idiot was too young when this album came out, I'd like to take them back to 1992. It was a time of great optimism and weariness. A Bush was leaving the White House, Bubba was going in. Ruby Ridge, Somalia, grunge, Starbucks as a household name, "A Few Good Men", blah blah blah.
A band called Pantera released an album called "Vulgar Display Of Power" that shocked critics by debuting at number 1 on the Billboard charts. VDOP wasn't the *first* heavy metal album to chart at no. 1 (that distinction goes to "Slave To The Grind" by Skid Row) but it certainly *was* the heaviest. This might not seem like a big deal in these days of nu-metal where any bunch of wiggers in cargo pants and backwards baseball caps can record an aggro-rap album.
The surprising thing about VDOP is that it has no obvious radio singles. Great songs yes, but no novelty songs, nothing that your grandmother will find herself humming along to, nothing that your Britney Spears listening friends will like. It's just a great album that was screaming to get recognized in a market that was becoming saturated with 'grunge' rock.
I love this album to death. "Mouth For War" and "This Love" are absolutely my favorite metal songs, right up there with "Children Of The Grave" and "War Pigs" by Sabbath and "Highway Star" by Deep Purple. "Walk" is great for listening if you've been disrespected. Who needs alcohol to get that inflated sense of self-esteem eh?
I was saddened to hear that "Dimebag" was murdered recently. I was just getting into these guys again. Great bands don't break up for song and I was thinking how great it would be if Pantera got back together and showed some of these limp biscuits how to grow a pair of [...]. RIP "Dimebag" Darrell!
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 38 people found the following review helpful By A. Stutheit on December 28, 2004
Format: Audio CD
What other critics said about this C.D.:

--Blender magazine included this in their "The 50 Greatest Rawk Albums of All Time" article and said it's "a brooding exercise in listener-as-punching bag, with Phil Anselmo's vocals a savage roar up against Dimebag Darrell's spiteful riffing."
--Entertainment Weekly gave it an "A" grade, and said it's "undoubtedly one of the most satisfying heavy-metal records since Metallica's early-'80s cult days."
--Q magazine: One of the "50 heaviest albums of all time."
--Yahoo music: "With songs as catchy as they are powerful, Vulgar Display may be the group's all-around best album."
--Napster (I couldn't agree more with this description): "A raw, pulverizing, insanely intense depiction of naked rage and hostility that drains its listeners and pounds them into submission."
--Hit Parader magazine has several times listed "Vulgar Display of Power" in their "Top 100 Metal C.D.'s of All Time" list.

Now, my review...:

Pantera albums in order, from best to least best:
1. Vulgar Display of Power
2. Far Beyond Driven
3. Cowboys From Hell
4. Reinventing the Steel
5. The Great Southern Trendkill (it's still a good album, though.)

Like Metallica, Pantera's sophomore effort was slower than their debut, 1990's "Cowboys from Hell," but it was also much heavier and more mature. Pantera continued to release albums (which were increasingly heavy) over the next eight years, and every one of their albums is an epic, but this band shines brightest on 1992's landmark, "Vulgar Display of Power.
Read more ›
14 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?