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W.A.S.P. Sting in the Tale Hardcover – June 16, 2011


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 294 pages
  • Publisher: Scotter Books; 2 edition (June 16, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 095693630X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0956936301
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.8 x 8.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,929,896 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Aaron Small on November 30, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Printed in double-spaced large font, this 263 page, unauthorized hardcover, is realistically only about 120 pages worth of text. UK author Darren P. Upton is a self-proclaimed "lifelong fan of W.A.S.P." His book begins in 1956 with the birth of Steven Edward Duren (known to the world as Blackie Lawless). From there it briefly recounts Blackie's childhood, noting that before getting shipped off to military school at the age of 14, he was in a street gang with KISS guitarist Ace Frehley. Years later Lawless had the very real opportunity to play Major League Baseball, but opted for a career in music instead. From that point on, overly-extensive focus is placed on pre-W.A.S.P. outfit SISTER. Finally getting around to the band who went "Blind In Texas," the author conducted exclusive interviews with former W.A.S.P. members: Randy Piper, Chris Holmes, Steve Riley, Johnny Rod, and Stet Howland. But rather than incorporating their insight into the flow of the book, he opts for a jarring and unedited Q&A format. While the 16 pages of colour and black & white photos are nice, as is the discography, Upton never gets in-depth enough with the topic at hand. For example, Holmes says that dating Lita Ford from 1987 to 1990 were the best days of his life; and that's it, no further exploration. Unfortunately this is typical as numerous interesting tidbits are revealed, but glossed over all too quickly. Ultimately, Blackie is painted as arrogant, self-centered and uncompromising, yet the author himself states, "For many of the band's followers, Blackie Lawless is W.A.S.P." So to write a "Definitive Biography" without interviewing the founder, songwriter and sole remaining original member seems rather contradictory.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Geo on March 18, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Very Average!!

Warning, this isnt as good as its hyped!

Save your money!!

The wording is huge and takes up all the space, hence its not as big as you first think. Secondly the photo's are hardly special or rare and lastly, the interviews are very amateurish and fan boy at its best. They should be more indepth and elaborated more then then all the "Yeahs" and "Laughing"

My copy will sure be on Ebay soon or at my local second hand book store
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steven A. McKay on May 7, 2012
Format: Hardcover
For the money, I would say "Sting in the Tale" is worth it to any big WASP fans. However, I've read almost all of the info in the book online already, there's really nothing new, the book just reprints things that have already been said online. Even the interviews tend to re-hash things that have already been said a hundred times in online interviews. Chris Holmes being mad at Blackie for being "jealous" and not letting him go with Lita Ford to some awards bash blah blah blah.
So, this is the problem - if you're a big WASP fan, you've probably already read all this stuff on the internet. But ONLY a big WASP fan is going to get any sort of value from this book.
Minor quibbles - the dedications list is enormous, and my heart sank when I saw David Icke on it. Thankfully he's only mentioned once in the book (yeah, David Icke got a mention in a book about WASP - FFS!?).
Second - I'm here to read about WASP - not WAS (Chris Holmes and Randy Pipers latest band). The interviews with past members all go into detail about what they're doing now. Pointless. It's a WASP book and besides, those guys change bands and members every ten minutes anyway.
Third - Rik Fox gets way too much space. He may have named the band - big deal. He had nothing to do with anything else in any meaningful way. The guy is a minor footnote in the band's history!
Fourth - the transcribing of each whole interview is annoying, as is the author getting his name in, like he's friends with these guys. For example (and this is made up, but similar to what to expect): DU: What's happening, Randy? RP: Just messing about, y'know Darren?
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