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4.1 out of 5 stars
WIRED
Format: Kindle EditionChange
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114 of 141 people found the following review helpful
on September 17, 2011
I loved this book. The cover art sucks, but don't let that fool you. This is was a very, very well written sci-fi book set in present day, my favorite kind of science fiction. Read it, you won't regret it.

I've never written a book review before, though I've literally read thousands of books in my lifetime, and a few hundred Amazon books. That's how good this book is.
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68 of 83 people found the following review helpful
The ultimate thriller! This is an excellent book. It has more twists and turns than a mountainous road in a third world country! Mr. Richards succeeded in surprising me several times during the book. I had a hard time putting it down. While every bit a thriller, it also had a hopeful view of humanity. I disagree with the author's conclusions, but that didn't take one iota away from my enjoyment of the book. I find myself hoping for another book from him in the same vein.
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210 of 264 people found the following review helpful
on October 11, 2011
The price played a part, too, in convincing me that I wanted to read this book. The first sentence was a bit off-putting ("Bill Callan extended his silenced Ruger .45"), because a silencer on a .45 isn't very stealthy, not to mention concealable. But I've seen lots of firearms mistakes in some of my favorite fiction, so I read on. "his investigation had hit pay dirt. Pay dirt far richer than he could ever have imagined." That was pretty clunky writing, but the reviews were raves, so I read on.
It began to interest me more when the action started, but then, "Admit your real name is Kira Miller or I'll break your left arm," he growled fiercely.
'Growling fiercely' really did nothing for me except raise another red flag.
But what the hell, this is an action thriller--who cares about how it's written if the action is good? Right? Right.
What finally tore my attention from the story was
"The driver of the oncoming car, a small Honda, managed to reduce his speed considerably, but couldn't stop from slamming into the passenger door of the Lexus, creating a violent and unmistakable explosion of sound that could only arise from the collision of two steel-and-glass missiles, each weighing thousands of pounds."
If none of this bothers you, you've found an exciting read. I just wasn't tough enough.
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56 of 68 people found the following review helpful
on August 29, 2011
Tight, fast-moving and well-written with lots of surprises. Enjoyable characters, intriguing science, and enough action to satisfy the adventure lovers.
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40 of 48 people found the following review helpful
on February 4, 2013
This book is one of (unfortunately) many atrocities currently passing for literature (and that somehow make best-seller lists). One has to wonder, especially in the case of one this bad, if it they make best-seller lists because people enjoyed reading them, or if they've just been so hyped and well-marketed that people buy them (as I did) blindly, and (also as I did) struggle to make it all the way through them. I did not make it through this one. I tried - really, I did. But the writing was just too poor - I found myself asking why I was wasting time with this book. The characters are flat, the dialogue is pathetically unrealistic (I caught myself laughing out loud several times), there's no plot to speak of (at best it's an afterthought), and - perhaps worst of all - this author tries to have these flat, phoney characters engage in philosophical dialogues about various "meaning-of-life" issues - and at the most inopportune and unrealistic moments imaginable (a kidnapper and her prey discussing the existence of God, for example, in detail, while the prey is tied to a hotel bed). Now normally, that wouldn't be a problem at all; done well, it could have elevated this trashy dime-novel into something really exceptional. But two things are needed for that literary device to work: first, the author needs to have a deep understanding of the topic (thereby he's able to lend his understanding to his characters), and second, the characters should be developed to the point that the conversation either further develops the character, or some facet of the character can be used to illustrate (perhaps subtly) a certain point about the philosophical topic at hand. Alas, Mr. Richards is far too amateurish in both his understanding of philosophy and his writing skill. Instead, he reveals himself as a shallow, simple-minded fanatic (even if one happens to agree with his viewpoints, as I generally did), callously using his cardboard characters to mercilessly pound the reader with his knuckle-dragging stupidity.

In short, use me as an example of someone who should have investigated before buying. Pass this one up. Don't waste your money.
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52 of 63 people found the following review helpful
on October 3, 2011
I really enjoyed Wired. A good story, well told. I found it enjoyable and engrossing, with good characterization and writing.

And some mind-blowing concepts. I haven't enjoyed a sci-fi book this much for years (and I've read a lot of them).

Will definitely look for more by this author.
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128 of 163 people found the following review helpful
on September 20, 2011
I have some questions for the author of this gem of a novel---and for those who just loved it:

Why did you write the prologue in the viewpoint of the guy we'll never see again rather than in Kira's? Why do we care what he thinks?

Why does Bill, being so big and strong, hold a pistol on Kira when, if she dies he gets nothing? Why doesn't he just grab her?

Why does Kira shoot at Bill with the gun in her pocket rather than taking a two hand stance and triple tapping him? Doesn't she know how to shoot?

Seeing as she just tried to kill him, why doesn't Bill tie her up and put her in the trunk rather than letting her drive? Can't he drive?

Why is the dialog so stilted, inane and boring? Kira asks: "How did you learn my true identity?" rather than "How do you know my name?"

Why does Bill, the merc, say to Kira: "I made some public inquiries into Kira Miller's background," instead of "I looked you up."? Who talks like that?

Why does Kira, confronted with her real name, try to continue pretending?

Why doesn't the dialog reveal her character?

Why do you feel it necessary to tell us what to think about what happens? "her bold attack" and "this bright attractive girl" and

Why do you tell us details we don't need to know? Like this gem: The car crashes... "creating a violent and unmistakable explosion of sound that could only arise from the collision of two steel-and-glass missiles, each weighing thousands of pounds."

Really, that's in there. I didn't make it up. Do you think that sounds poetic or clever or writer-like or what? It doesn't. It sounds like a writer who has yet to master his craft and yet to grasp one of the most basic rules of writing: resist the urge to explain.

Now if you don't care what kind of slop you read, then I'm happy for you, but if you, like I, can't help but paying attention to what you read, then you may want to download the sample and read the first chapter before you buy this.

And a final question for all of those who loved this book: Have you ever read a book you didn't love?
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on December 11, 2012
First of all I'm a little surprised that WIRED made the NY Times Bestseller list. Not sure what's going on with that.

I didn't hate the book. I am a sucker for a techno-thriller and this book could be called that. Douglas Richards does a good job sucking you in and keeping the story moving but the writing really isn't great. This isn't Michael Crichton or Tom Clancy level stuff.

For me the weakest point of the writing is the dialogue. It's cliche, it doesn't fit the characters and it doesn't fit the moments. I nearly put the book down at several point simply because of how bad the dialogue could be. The monologues by the main character are supposed to be the musings of a person who has experienced enhanced "god-like" level thought but what's on the page looks more like the ravings of a sophomore philosophy major. The epilogue is nearly the worst. But then how could Douglas Richards do any better? He isn't amped up on those gel-caps like his characters. He's just echoing the same droll humanistic atheist/agnostic stuff we've heard before. Not a bad execution of it but no breakthrough ideas in there. He rounds it out with a tired new age monologue at the end. Boring.

There is a lot of "tell" in this book and very little show when it comes to the story. The bad guys always have to lay out the entirety of their evil plan for the heroes for reasons no one can say. That never seems to bright to me but these super-geniuses must figure telling all the details of their plot actually furthers their agenda.

He also doesn't seem to have much understanding of the US special forces as his treatment of anything military smells pretty hollywood.

The main characters try to banter back and forth as "well read" individuals but all the references are limited to the pop culture world of a high school boy. I'm sorry but Lord of the Rings, Alice in Wonderland and Star Wars doesn't classify as "well read" in my opinion.

Finally, while I didn't dislike the plot it is far from groundbreaking and twisted a bit too many times to still be plausible.

In the words of another techno-thriller author, "The difference between reality and fiction is that fiction has to make sense." The plot is fiction for sure and what the characters have to say definitely doesn't make any sense.

If you are interested in amplifying your mental abilities and achieving super-human human intelligence... this book isn't the place to start.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on September 25, 2011
This was one of the first Kindle books I read. I was surprised at how the book captivated me and made me want to pick up my tablet. This book is definitely worth checking out. This was encouraging enough to make me seek out other books by Douglas.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on October 3, 2011
This was the first book by Douglas E. Richards that I read. It was $0.79 on Kindle, and had good reviews. How could I go wrong?

It was the best $0.79 I ever spent. I absolutely loved this book. It wasn't perfect, there were a few plot twists that seemed obvious to me, but there were far more that completely caught me off-guard, especially the ending. It was a very exciting read.

The plot was very well thought out. The premise and the situations in the book were very believable. It wasn't one of those stories where you keep thinking, "Well, why didn't they just..." Also, I found his theories about humanity and human nature to be quite fascinating.

After reading Wired, I immediately looked up what other books he had written. I ended up buying the whole Prometheus Trilogy and read it over the weekend. Even though the series was aimed at young adults, I still found it very enjoyable, especially the third book.

Douglas E. Richards has definitely made it onto my list of authors to watch.
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