Wabi-Sabi: for Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers
 
 


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Wabi-Sabi: for Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers [Paperback]

Leonard Koren
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Wabi-Sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets and Philosophers is a touchstone for designers of all stripes. . . ." -The New York Times

"In a prominent spot near Square's welcome lobby stands a communal bookshelf. . . Most titles lining the shelves cover subjects you might expect at a high-flying tech startup. . . And then there are books placed on the shelf by [Twitter and Square co-founder Jack] Dorsey. He offers up Wabi-Sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers --an explication of the Japanese concept of serendipitous beauty." -The Wall Street Journal

"Indeed, you could say that Koren has spearheaded the design equivalent of the slow food movement." -The New York Times

From the Author

clarity, simplicity & insight

About the Author

Leonard Koren, trained as an artist and architect, writes books about design and aesthetics.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Wabi-sabi is the most conspicuous and characteristic feature of what we think of as traditional Japanese beauty. It occupies roughly the same position in the Japanese pantheon of aesthetic values as do the Greek ideals of beauty and perfection in the West. Wabi-sabi can in its fullest expression be a way of life. At the very least, it is a particular type of beauty. The closest English word to wabi-sabi is probably "rustic." Webster's defines "rustic" as "simple, artless, or unsophisticated . . . [with] surfaces rough or irregular." While "rustic" represents only a limited dimension of the wabi-sabi aesthetic, it is the initial impression many people have when they first see a wabi-sabi expression . . . Originally, the Japanese words "wabi" and "sabi" had quite different meanings. "Sabi" originally meant "chill," "lean," or "withered." "Wabi" originally meant the misery of living alone in nature, away from society, and suggested a discouraged, dispirited, cheerless emotional state. Around the 14th century, the meanings of both words began to evolve in the direction of more positive aesthetic values. The self-imposed isolation and voluntary poverty of the hermit and ascetic came to be considered opportunities for spiritual richness. For the poetically inclined, this kind of life fostered an appreciation of the minor details of everyday life and insights into the beauty of inconspicuous and overlooked aspects of nature. In turn, unprepossessing simplicity took on new meaning as the basis for a new, pure beauty. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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