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67 of 74 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wacom's new toy
The Wacom Inkling arrived today so I did some quick tests. Lots of good things to say in terms of the accuracy of the capture. The pen even works as a mouse on the screen when it's plugged in, just like a Wacom tablet (that was pretty cool).

A little less cool is the sketch manager software which was unusable on my main display in Windows 7. The menus began...
Published on November 22, 2011 by Sid M

versus
725 of 734 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars How Accurate? Watch the Video to See!
Customer Video Review     Length:: 9:43 Mins
Like others, I've been waiting for this product for months while at the same time wondering how accurate it would be. Mine arrived last night and I was almost afraid to try it because I didn't want to be disappointed--unfortunately, I am.

In all fairness to Wacom, the Inkling does do what it is advertised to do. It is a "tool for...
Published on November 24, 2011 by V. Hutson


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725 of 734 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars How Accurate? Watch the Video to See!, November 24, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Wacom Inkling Digital Sketch Pen (MDP123) (Personal Computers)
Length:: 9:43 Mins

Like others, I've been waiting for this product for months while at the same time wondering how accurate it would be. Mine arrived last night and I was almost afraid to try it because I didn't want to be disappointed--unfortunately, I am.

In all fairness to Wacom, the Inkling does do what it is advertised to do. It is a "tool for capturing ideas and concepts for later refinement on your computer using Wacom Intuos pen tablets." I just didn't expect that the line art would need as much "refining" as it does.

I have drawn over 40 sketches with the Inkling and I've found that it works at an acceptable level of accuracy when I draw relatively close to the receiver (a couple inches below it). In fact, a few drawings have been remarkably accurate--but many have been way off, especially when I draw near the lower portions of a letter size sheet. If you watch the video you can see this.

The pen is wider than a normal pen or pencil. The lower grip area is almost identical to my Cintiq pen, but the weight and balance is different and it will take me a while to get used to it. Also, I normally sketch on paper with a pencil or sometimes a marker, so sketching with a ball-point pen is a big change for me.

The Sketch Manager software works well on my Windows 7 (64-bit) computer and I can easily export images to Photoshop and Illustrator. However, when I export layered images to SketchBook Pro things looked terrible--the layers don't line up. It is possible to use the Inkling Sketch Manager software to first save your image and then open it directly in SketchBook Pro rather than "exporting" it. However, when you use this approach all of the layers are flattened even if you save it as a tiff file. Inkling images without layers open fine in Sketchbook Pro.

As for pressure sensitivity--I've done several tests on this by drawing rows of parallel lines with various pen pressures. I've found that there is only a slight difference in the darkness or the thickness of the line between drawing very light and pressing quite hard.

From the very beginning I have been extremely careful about making sure that nothing was blocking the pathway between the pen and the receiver. I feel confident that the inaccuracies I am experiencing are not due to a physical obstruction between the receiver and pen.

An unexpected feature is when the Inkling is connected to the computer it is able to control the cursor on the computer. This feature is included so that you can adjust the "Click Threshold" of the pen. The "unadvertised" benefit of this is that the Inkling pen can be used in a way very similar to how Wacom's digital tablets work. I can use the Inkling to draw directly in Photoshop. Unfortunately, the pressure sensitivity of the pen doesn't seem to be active when it is being used inside a program. I was unable to control the thickness of my lines or the opacity of the stoke by applying more pressure when drawing directly in Photoshop or Sketchbook Pro. If the pressure sensitivity did work inside Photoshop--I would add an additional star to my review.

Bottom line: The accuracy of this pen ranges from fairly decent to poor depending on the distance from the receiver, the use of layers (layers seem to throw the accuracy off a bit), and if you add lines to previously drawn areas. I just wish it was more accurate.

Updated 11/28/2011: I have now drawn over 90 drawings with the Inkling. I've added a couple minutes to the original video. I've found that if I attach the receiver to the left side of the paper (I'm right handed) it works better than at the top because no area of the paper is farther than 6 or 7 inches away. Make sure you change the Inkling setting when you do this.

Updated 01/01/2012: I've added another few minutes to the original video that shows the accuracy of the Inkling when drawing some simple faces. In addition, I have included a short section on how the Inkling's drawings compare to drawings produced by the Livescribe pen. I purchased a Livescribe pen after my initial disappointment with the Inkling. For me, the Livescribe pen has been much more accurate, and since I don't use vectors, and I can live without layers in my line art, I actually prefer using the Livescribe pen (sorry Wacom).

Updated 2/17/2012: My Inkling stopped working properly at the beginning of January after it froze up and would not respond for several minutes. The next day it started working again, but I still contacted Wacom about it. They offered to replace it and I took them up on the offer. Unfortunately, the replacement works terribly. It is only accurate within a very small area near the receiver. Anything drawn farther than 3 or 4 inches from the receiver looks terrible with so many missing lines and misalignments that the drawings are almost unrecognizable. Fortunately, I still have my first one which I intend to keep. I had been wondering if perhaps the accuracy of the Inkling varied from pen to pen. That might explain the wide range of reviews here. Based on my experience the accuracy does vary and that is unfortunate.

Updated 4/17/2012: I never use this. It just isn't accurate enough for my type of drawing. I'm going to list it for sale on Amazon for half price ($99) and at least get some of my money back. There was one time in January where it froze for about 15 minutes but other than that it has worked the same as shown in my videos. The reason I'm selling it at half price is that the 2-year warranty only covers the initial buyer.

Update 4/18/2012: Sold!
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125 of 137 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Simply Heart Breaking, December 10, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Wacom Inkling Digital Sketch Pen (MDP123) (Personal Computers)
I am writing this as a warning to consumers: do NOT buy the Wacom Inkling.
I received this product in the mail yesterday, and returned it today.

The verdict is simply heart breaking...

I had been extremely excited with the hype behind the inkling. The idea is genius. The execution is fundamentally flawed.
The product does not work. Wacom released a product that does not work.

What do I mean it does not work? The inkling DOES digitize your paper sketch, but does not do so accurately. It does so with gross and noticeable mis-alignments in your digitized drawings. This really renders the product absolutely useless. I thought that maybe I was bumping the paper or receiver so I placed weights upon the paper. I also made certain that the receiver was not obstructed in any way. I purposefully drew each line with care. It did not help.

I was so looking forward to the inkling and now I just feel let down.
I really hope Wacom tightens up their product and re-releases it. The Inkling really is an amazing idea.
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67 of 74 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wacom's new toy, November 22, 2011
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This review is from: Wacom Inkling Digital Sketch Pen (MDP123) (Personal Computers)
The Wacom Inkling arrived today so I did some quick tests. Lots of good things to say in terms of the accuracy of the capture. The pen even works as a mouse on the screen when it's plugged in, just like a Wacom tablet (that was pretty cool).

A little less cool is the sketch manager software which was unusable on my main display in Windows 7. The menus began working when moving it to the secondary but then stopped working again until moving it to the main display. I hope they release some software updates for it.

One disappointing thing so far - When exporting directly to Photoshop, you can see slight jaggies from the recorded data in the sketch at 100%. It seems to sample your positional data as you draw, but the line is not completely smooth. I was hoping the need to redraw lines from a sketch would be alleviated by this product but so far that may not be the case. They use actions to import the point data into Photoshop. Maybe playing with the brush size settings will take care of some of it but this seems like something that could be fixed in software too.

In Illustrator, you can also see the loads of sampled positional points. Lines that need modification will need to be simplified before doing so. However, you get zero jaggies and this could be a good intermediate stage before bringing your illustration into Photoshop for crisp lines without jaggies.

That said, I'm very excited to see what is possible with this innovative device.
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bummer :(, December 11, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Wacom Inkling Digital Sketch Pen (MDP123) (Personal Computers)
I had pre-ordered the Inkling way back when it was expected to be shipped mid-September. Admittedly, I succumbed to the hype and was super excited to finally get one in the first batch of Amazon available, Nov. 21st. Too bad that after about two weeks of trying to get this device to work as advertised I had to return it. So so sad. This would have been a GREAT device if Wacom would have released an Inkling that even approached its promised capabilities.

My experience in short: The Inkling is nowhere near accurate in recording a user's mark-making. I tested this particular shortcoming under many different conditions, going so far as to have others test the product with me in case the problems were the result of the way I was holding the pen. Nothing worked to make this any better, no matter who I tested this with or either of our styles of drawing. The unit seemed to be operating as it should (by the LED's showing connectivity between the pen and the receiver) but when viewing the resulting drawings the marks were nowhere near where they showed up on the actual paper, if they showed up in the digital file at all. Many times much of the mark-making was missing completely, even from the dead-center of the image, where the inkling in theory should be recording best.

I'm not even going to go into the clunky software or my experience of how it interfaces with Adobe products. I think other reviewers here have skewered Wacom on those points enough for anyone seriously considering purchasing Inkling to seriously think again.

Bottom line: bank that cash and wait for Wacom to mature the hardware/rework the software.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Powerful On-the-Go Sketching Tool with Potential, December 4, 2011
By 
Anath (Boston, MA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Wacom Inkling Digital Sketch Pen (MDP123) (Personal Computers)
After a short weekend with this pen, I must say I'm a fan. However, I have a few minor gripes but I am willing to bet Inkling 2.0 will fix these. Also remember that the purpose of this pen is primarily sketching; not text and not finished/polished work.

In summary:
Pro
Well Designed Case
Portability
Quality/Functionality of sketches
Ease of setup

Neutral:
Sketch Manager
Be careful with your hands

Con:
First Generation Glitches
First Generation Missing Features

My system specs; your experience may vary.
Mac 10.5 Intel based
Adobe Suite CS3

Detailed breakdown:

Pro:
~Well designed case.
Everything you need for use is stored in an economical 2.5x6.75x.75 (ish) inch box that closes magnetically. There are refill inks, a mini usb-usb cable, the receiver, and the pen fits neatly into the center of the hinges. The only bit of this that makes me nervous is the fact that in order to plug in the receiver, the user places it slightly to the left, and slides it onto a mini USB dock. This dock seems like it could be potentially fragile. There are two pages in the Quick Start Guide that demonstrate proper technique for removing and replacing the receiver, and my worries have gone down with practice.

~Portability
Along with the well designed case, it is worth mentioning that the case is the perfect size for my backpack or a large pocket. It slides in the small gap next to my books and when I went on a little field trip this weekend, I was able to capture all my sketches digitally. When I came home I could just plug the receiver in start using my sketches, rather than spending the first hour at home scanning everything in. If you're sketching on the go a lot, this may be the tool to get, but if you do most of your sketching at home or are comfortable sketching directly into Photoshop it may not help you as much.

~Quality of sketches superior to scans of same image in terms of functionality.
Maybe it's just the scanners I tend to use or my method of sketching, but I tend to have difficulty using its output directly without either re-inking the whole thing or settling with certain limitations. With the Inkling almost every line I make is present and functional. I can adjust mistakes by selecting the entire group of lines in Illustrator later or making a new line, and if I feel comfortable with the work I can immediately start to color underneath the lines. Steps of my process have been entirely eliminated, and time has been saved.

~Ease of setup:
The Quick Start Guide is written with the lowest common denominator in mind. Everything has a detailed diagram, and as few words as possible, presented in English, French, Spanish and "PT-BR" which I assume is Portuguese. This appeared deceivingly simple to me, but the setup was actually as basic as it looked. Put the battery in the pen, put the pen in the case, plug the case into the computer, charge for 3 hours. That's it. All software and full instructions are included on the receiver itself, and accessible as soon as you plug it in. I remember fighting with a Cintiq to play nicely with my computer, as well as small hiccups with Intuos 3/4's, but I had no experience of this with Inkling.

Neutral:
~Sketch Manager Software
Honestly I'm not as against Sketch Manager as many of the reviews I have read. It's not an amazing piece of software but I never intended to use it as anything but a file converter/image viewer (incidentally this is also how I use Bridge; to preview my Raw files before Photoshop, and see different formats at once). With Sketch Manager, I can see what sketches turned out well enough to transfer to a useful program and transfer the file there. I am actually happy that the pen has its own file format to export from because I can only imagine the problems otherwise. I'm also not stuck with either Photoshop or Illustrator files. My process demands freedom to decide between the two and switch depending on the situation. Sometimes the transfer is not so smooth. With Inkling it is. I've been relatively happy with the results in both programs, and my displeasure falls under First Generation Glitches.
So ultimately, Sketch Manager is an alright viewer, and sends does what it needs to, that is, convert your files. However there are a few features I would like to see in the program as mentioned under Con.

~Be careful with your hands.
If you break the connection between receiver and pen, you may miss a stroke. I have a tenancy to choke up on my pens and pencils with my fingers so I have to be more considerate. However, this fact of the technology is so obvious that I really can't count it as a con, I just have to follow the proper pen posture my 2nd grade teacher showed me.

Con:
~First Generation Glitches
Since I am part of the first wave of consumers, I expected this. Therefore I am not going to let them impact my rating, but I will tell you about my experience. I am at a medium level of troubleshooting, and I am able to use the product despite the problems.
First, I am unable to access the preferences panel in Sketch Manager, which means I can't modify ANY settings. I cannot calibrate my pen, I cannot tell it what side of the paper I like to clip the receiver to, and so on. Even so, my experience has been fine without adjusting any settings.
Some errors in conversion into both Illustrator and Photoshop have been experienced, though minor. My Illustrator files have the sketches appearing very far to the left of the generated working area. One of my sketches got a minor crop in Photoshop, and anything outside the white square page that appears in sketch manager is cropped in conversion to Photoshop (but not Illustrator). Also all of the lines appear either blue or red going into Photoshop, and I can't tell it not to do this. All of these strange issues may not exist in other CS versions, or may be fixed with the next patch. However there is no where to update the software as of 12/4/11.

~First Generation Missing Features
Sketch Manager doesn't have many functions. I like that it is kept simple, but some of these features seem essential to me. First, one cannot crop a sketch before exporting. In an instance where I draw multiple sketches per file, or have only one section of the sketch I want, I have to wait until after exporting to fix. Additionally, one cannot grab and drag the whole sketch (or part of it) across the white default page area. In the instances mentioned above where I drew outside the default page, and without the ability to adjust my page orientation in Preferences, I can't salvage the half that dangles outside, or move say, the tiger in the corner to the center of the page. I have to wait for export. I know Sketch Manager has some "advanced" editing features (that I don't use) with the Scrubber, etc, but why not have just a few simple features, too?

In conclusion, I give this product 5 stars (would be 4.5 if I could) because I do not believe the Cons significant enough to detract from the advantages it provides, even as a First Generation product. If Wacom does not fix its First Generation problems then I will be more critical in the future.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Just Don't Get It Now, Wait For New Versions, January 29, 2012
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Wacom Inkling Digital Sketch Pen (MDP123) (Personal Computers)
I've gotten two of them and I have to say, I knew based on reviews what I was getting myself into.

The first Inkling was purchased when they became available (after preorders were fulfilled) immediately after Christmas. I followed all the directions, charging the pen and receiver for approximately 3+ hours until their lights were green. I was so excited to play with my new pen.

I've been using Wacom tablets (intuos 2 and 3 and a penabled tablet pc) for over ten years. I understand most people don't calibrate their wacom tablets, they don't know how to use drawing devices properly, and so give them poor reviews. THIS IS NOT THE CASE WITH THE INKLING!

My first pen never charged fully again after day one. It would only capture 1/4 of my doodles and messy sketches. The pen would shut off, and the receiver would go CRAZY making new layers when I'd never touched it! I called wacom to ask about returning the product, as it's standard to usually go through the manufacturer rather than the retailer. Wacom was very pleasant, but told me that returns and repairs (under warranty) take approximately 10 - 15 business days to be processed/approved/evaluated. So honestly, it was faster to return it through Amazon and get it replaced.

Only four days later, my 2nd Inkling arrived! Yippee! Even despite the first one being defective, I was definitely willing to give it all my enthusiasm and effort a second time around.

IF YOUR INKLING HAS MAGNETIC FEET on the inside outer edge of the case that help snap it shut, YOU HAVE VERSION 2.

My first pen case was designed DIFFERENTLY (no magnetic feet); It's hinge also had a sodering defect so the pen charger would lose power constantly if you closed/opened/touched the case.

Version 2 was slightly more accurate, had a much better battery life (considering the first one was always dead), but it still missed tons of drawings. There was never, ever, pen pressure or sensitivity. Not in photoshop, not in anything. Even when calibrated with the proper papersize, and making sure to never block the receiver/pen tip, the pen was.... barely useable.

Useful? No. Convenient? Definitely not. Great idea? Yes, BUT...

Just save yourself the time and frustration, use the 200$ toward something else... like art supplies, a new wacom tablet, the Livescribe pen (I've heard it's great).

Will I ever buy another Inkling?

Perhaps, if a new version comes around with better software (It's terrible, not intuitive), and it has to be ACCURATE.

The few people who gave it good reviews must have gotten Inklings that were magical and blessed by the art gods, because mine weren't even close.

Sorry Wacom, I still love you...
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wacom Inkling, December 7, 2011
By 
Aaron Sanchez (BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA, US) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Wacom Inkling Digital Sketch Pen (MDP123) (Personal Computers)
I was given the wacom inkling about a week ago, for my birthday. As we all know, it is incredibly hard to find this item on the internet to this day, and the only reviews that I found seemed pretty mixed in terms of how well the inkling performs. First, know that I have been using the inkling every day now for about a week now, and I think that it just takes a little getting used to it. You don't have to get used to the feeling and weight of the pen, I didn't have a problem, and would actually say that the inkling pen feels great in the hand. With that said, the getting used to comes in regards to how to properly hold the pen so that the receiver gets a good angle to register your every stroke.
The pen is meant to be held without obstructing the cage-shaped tip, otherwise you get missing strokes when you check your sketches on your computer, which I got a lot at the beginning. However, I got better over the course of a couple of days, and now I have been able to sketch and upload my sketches without any problems.
If you are wondering if this product is worth buying, I'd say honestly, as an art student in Animation, that this is the perfect way to digitally record your drawings on the go, without worrying about scanning them later on. Also, it is the best option you have before buying a pressure sensitive slate computer.
So, although some people would argue that you get more control using an actual tablet from wacom, which i agree they are. i still think that the wacom inkling is an awesome to begin drawing and sketching your ideas to later bring them into life on any graphics design and animation software. You just can't get anything better within this price range, and being a wacom product, you can rest assured that this is a quality product from a company whose products are the industry standard in multimedia.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars More problems than just line accuracy., January 14, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Wacom Inkling Digital Sketch Pen (MDP123) (Personal Computers)
I recently ordered the Inkling (Jan 2012) after much pondering.

I read and watched many reviews - some by tech enthusiasts simply messing around with the device, and some more insightful ones by artists who actually used the device for what it was intended for. Therefore the hype was long gone when I received the product and I knew what I was going to get. I am used to other Wacom devices (Graphire, Intuos 2 to 4 and Cintiq) and knew that the Inkling was something quite different by nature.

As mentioned everywhere (and now as openly acknowledged by Wacom), the Inkling is not about line accuracy. The marketing videos were very misleading, but a little bit of skepticism and research made it obvious. In short : if you sketch two lines creating one single continuous line on paper, chances are, these two strokes will be disconnected in the Inkling sketch.

Knowing that, the device is great for scribbling. The loose quality is exactly what I was looking for, and the added bonus of the vector nature of the recording actually makes lines even thinner and sharper on screen than they would be on a scan. I was very happy with my first few sketches, and took them to Photoshop right away for extra painting. Great feeling.

However!

- After a while, I started to notice that some sketches were being saved in the receiver in a corrupted state. I could clearly see them saved in the USB directory structure of the device, but the Inkling Sketch Manager wouldn't see or open them and would crash if I ever tried to double click the associated proprietary .WPI file in Explorer.

- Furthermore, it seems like the actual physical port and/or USB cable being used does matter to the device. Some sketches that I could not open with the receiver plugged with a regular mini USB cable coming from a back port of my computer, would open fine if I plugged the receiver to a front USB port, with the cable provided by Wacom (admittedly, this is the port that I used the very first time I used the device). This is a very bad sign already as this is not how USB devices are supposed to work. It speaks very badly of the Inkling drivers and software.

- Last, the Sketch Manager is an intrusive piece of software (on top of being very badly designed). After I installed it on my win7 64 PC, I noticed that the program launched itself on computer startup, even tho I never set it to do so, and even without the receiver being plugged in. The software is not present as a "startup" folder item, therefore Wacom used some sneaky practices to make it start up against the user's will. Again, a very bad practice. A forum admin mentioned that a workaround consists of changing the name of the .exe to something else than its original name to trick the startup procedure. Not an acceptable fix...

[...]

All in one, the overall bad experience provided by the Inkling far outweighs the pleasure of squeezing out a few non-corrupt sketches out of the device. You can find more problems and information on the user forum :

[...]

On the plus side, I loved the shape of the body of the pen - nice and hefty. It made me want to find a nice, solid ball point pen to draw with from now on! Besides that, the Inkling is now back in its box ready to be returned.

1 star.

Hope this helps!
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not for professional artist, November 24, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Wacom Inkling Digital Sketch Pen (MDP123) (Personal Computers)
I was so excited to get my Wacom Inkling, been waiting patiently since September. I loved the feel of the pen. It feels mostly like any other Wacom pen and that's great. I'm disappointed in how badly it rendered my sketches though. Sure I got a similar image of what I had drawn but simple things like filling in areas and doing parallel lines beside each other in a quick sketching motion rendered very badly in the digital sketch. I also did a sketch of a water bottle and I didn't move the paper at all (totally stationary) and the head of the water bottle was off obout 1/4 inch. I don't know. Maybe I'm just wanting it to render exactly what I draw, but as of right now that's not happening. Don't try to do fancy style lettering either or anything very intricate for that matter.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It does what was designed for, December 22, 2011
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This review is from: Wacom Inkling Digital Sketch Pen (MDP123) (Personal Computers)
Length:: 0:28 Mins

Just got it.

Like Wacom says about it in their website-
"Inkling is for artists, illustrators and designers who sketch their first rough ideas on paper, then wish to quickly and easily convert their sketches to an editable digital format."

My experience with it confirms that the wacom Inkling does exactly that! ;-)
A rough is not a finished/polished drawing.(a tablet is more suitable for that). The lines recorded to the device were pretty close to the original drawings i did and it transferred quite easily to Photoshop, illustrator and Sketchbook Pro.
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