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  • Wagner - Siegfried /  West, Gasteen, Göhring, Schöne, Waag, Jun, Herrera, Zagrosek, Stuttgart Opera
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Wagner - Siegfried / West, Gasteen, Göhring, Schöne, Waag, Jun, Herrera, Zagrosek, Stuttgart Opera


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Product Details

  • Actors: Jon Fredric West, Lisa Gasteen, Lothar Zagrosek
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Classical, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: German
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: TDK DVD
  • DVD Release Date: May 18, 2004
  • Run Time: 251 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0001Z95P0
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #360,662 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

No production of the Ring can conclusively answer all the questions thrown up by this theatrical cosmos. The puzzles, anomalies and contradictions will never be completely resolved or even reconciled. But Jossi Wieler’s direction, in sets by Anna Viebrock, exercises an unprecedented power of suggestion to draw from Siegfried the glummest of all comedies, making laughter die in the throat, and presenting only one negative figure: the Wanderer, Wotan. Here, the god is a schizoid: the CEO of Walhall Inc. who has lost his power base. He should have retired long ago, but he still flaunts himself, an elegant old rocker in jeans, leather jacket and shades: impotent, but still enjoying sadistic little games, like the quiz in which Mime’s head is the prize.

Picture Format: 16:9 anamorphic • Subtitles: GB / D / F / I / E • Sound Format: DD 5.1 / DTS 5.1 / PCM Stereo

Customer Reviews

Well, the settings are grotesquely (and obviously purposely) inappropriate in the extreme.
J Scott Morrison
The Stuttgart -- seven DVD -- version of Richard Wagner's four opera Ring cycle, has made its somewhat disappointing 2004 premier.
OperaOnline.us
I say unfortunately, because if he sang as bad as he looked, one could simply turn the damned thing off.
G P Padillo

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

This production of 'Siegfried' has everything wrong with it but the music. The singing is generally quite good, the orchestra is spectacular under the direction of Lothar Zagrosek. But this 2002 production from the Staatsoper Stuttgart is so grotesquely awful that I will admit that I did not watch every last moment of it. After the shock of the first few scenes I was only able to bear skimming the rest of it, although I did settle down for such things as the Forging Scene, the scene with the Woodbird, the Wanderer's monolog, and much of the Third Act. Still, it was painful.
Where to start? Well, the settings are grotesquely (and obviously purposely) inappropriate in the extreme. The opening scene, in Mime's cave, is set in a kind of kitchen/workshop that looks like it came out of the 50s, and perhaps the 1950s is when all this is supposed to be taking place. Why? In the opening scene Mime is peeling potatoes - the anvil strokes called for in the libretto and score are done by Mime hitting the side of a metal bowl with a potato peeler - you think I'm kidding? - I'm not. Siegfried, sung (well) by the more-than-morbidly obese Jon Frederic West, is kitted out in jeans, tennies and a grotty white teeshirt with the words 'Sieg Fried' written on it. [For some reason, the Dragon also has on a tee shirt with 'Sieg Fried' in mirror-writing.] Siegfried's blond hair is long, ratty, and even from a distance looks like it hasn't been washed in six months. He wears this same outfit through the whole opera; it is splattered liberally with Fafner's blood after he kills the him and through the rest of the opera we have a hero with a gruesomely bloody shirt. Ewwww! Wotan, as The Wanderer, is a motorcycle dude, in cycle boots, jeans, leather jacket, ball cap.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By G P Padillo VINE VOICE on January 4, 2006
Words cannot adequately describe the ghastly, physically repulsive Siegfried I watched over the holidays. It's taken me days (and purging myself through hours of football) to make myself remember that opera is my life's passion. This Siegfried, from Stuttgart was, on most counts, musically thrilling, one of the better sung productions I've heard in years, but almost unbearable to watch.

Heinz Göhrig is Mime and he's dressed rather like Mr. Rogers. In a, huge, filthy apartment (with a forge and billows by the stove?) we find him peelin' `taters. The anvil strikes are here produced by Mime banging his peeler against the metal pot. It's actually a bit of fun and one of the few gimmicks that works here. Unfotunately, after his interview with The Wanderer and having the bejesus scared out of him, he shoves his hand down his pants and masturbates. Really. I guess the guy gets off on fear.

I've never thought of Jon Frederic West as obese, but here he looks like Bruce Vilanch got up as the late Edith Massey (for those unfamiliar with either reference, trust me, it's about as gruesome as one can imagine). West, in "normal" costumes looks like a beefy, possibly overfed tenor and not a particularly good actor. Here, his ample carcass is stuffed into ill fitting jeans with a filthy grimy tee-shirt bearing his name SIEG FRIED (haven't figured out the blank space). His hair is a filthy mop of long blonde locks that appears never to have been washed. With his short stature and wide, ungainly girth, one would assume that his mobility would be severely unlimited. Oh, were that only the case. Instead, the portly West jumps and hurtles and races about the stage with a face exhibiting the complete range of human emotions from A to B. Or maybe A and a half.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Frederick II of Hohenstaufen on June 28, 2004
This is not really a one star DVD, it is really zero stars. The costumes and stage design are the most ridiculous I've ever seen. Be warned!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Robusto Tenor on December 2, 2006
If you don't think listening to opera and watching it can be two fundamentally different experiences, you have long stretches of demonstration material here to convince you. Seriously, just close your eyes and listen. The conductor, orchestra, and singers are all spectacular, with the exception of maybe Wotan (Schone), who sounded hard-pressed, sometimes strained, and a little wobbly. The sound is remarkably clear and spacious. The production is bold and interesting, certainly, but this opera is just way too long to have to look at what they've done here for hours at a time. I give special applause to the singers who must be said to be very much "with" the production values and do their best to make this work (again, with the exception of Schone who seems embarrassed from the beginning). But in my opinion, it looks too bizarre.

Special kudos must go to Gohrig (Mime) who probably holds the world record for "Longest Masterbation Scene in Front of a Live Opera Audience", and Waag (Alberich)who probably had to smoke cigarettes onstage longer than any other opera singer (if I'm wrong about either, I'm not sure I want to know).

I will say that even if Wagner were alive today, I somehow doubt he'd approve of this "jeans and t-shirt" concept of his opera. I mean, sneakers, baseball caps, and plus-sized lingerie might be a bit too flippant for this kind of stage work. And poor Jon Fredric West, whose body-type obviously wasn't taken into consideration when his costume was designed, ends up looking like he has ketchup all over his shirt instead of blood, as if he had just devoured several Big Macs at McDonalds. If the world were ideal, he would look as gorgeous and heroic as his voice.
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