Wagner: Tristan und Isolde (3 CDs)

November 11, 1997 | Format: MP3

$28.49
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
10:39
30
2
5:33
30
3
9:18
30
4
18:34
30
5
6:50
30
6
17:58
30
7
6:20
Disc 2
30
1
1:59
30
2
13:08
30
3
15:07
30
4
4:49
30
5
2:29
30
6
4:09
30
7
2:11
30
8
7:35
30
9
1:41
30
10
11:04
30
11
8:08
Disc 3
30
1
4:14
30
2
2:34
30
3
8:09
30
4
9:19
30
5
4:59
30
6
11:14
30
7
9:04
30
8
3:11
30
9
5:00
30
10
7:21
30
11
6:15
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 9, 1997
  • Release Date: November 11, 1997
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • Copyright: (C) 1997 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 3:38:52
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0015T7KRQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #136,634 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

165 of 172 people found the following review helpful By cdsullivan@massed.net on October 29, 2000
Format: Audio CD
This recording of "Tristan und Isolde" was made live at the 1966 Bayreuth Festival. It was a separate performance, though, designated for this recording, and recorded an act at a time so that the singers would be able to sing "all out" in every act. While the results are not flawless, the compelling drama and power of this "Tristan" are something to marvel at, and in my final rundown this gets the silver medal for best "Tristan."
First and foremost is the magnificent supporting cast, by far the best on any recording. Martti Talvela, the great Finnish bass, sings a gorgeous Marke, superbly shaping his long Act II monologue and producing bronze-colored, resonant tone throughout. He is by far the best King on disc. Christa Ludwig sings Brangäne, perhaps the key supporting character, with glorious, creamy tone and deep insight; the finest Brangäne I have ever heard. The supporting cast is rounded out by Eberhard Wächter, a superb Kurwenal, and (luxury casting) Peter Schreier as the sailor. The chorus contributes excellent work.
Only slightly below this towering standard are Birgit Nilsson (Isolde) and Wolfgang Windgassen (Tristan). Nilsson's Act I is one of the most magnificent vocal achievements on record. She attacks each exposed high note with total security and perfect intonation, and sings intensely and powerfully, here at least the equal of Flagstad. Her Act II is not as good, though, because here she has to sing softly and beautifully (never her strong points), and while she is admirable, she doesn't evoke that sense of awe at the sheer quality of voice that comes from Flagstad. Her two Act III monologues are excellent, particularly her earlier one ("Ich bin's, ich bin's, süssester Freund").
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40 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Klingsor Tristan on August 18, 2005
Format: Audio CD
I was lucky enough to be present at the last outing of this Wieland Wagner production with essentially the same cast - the curtain calls went on for more than 45 minutes!

Undoubtedly, this is a totally exceptional performance - one of those live performances that catches fire from the first enigmatic rise and fall to the famous 'Tristan' chord and never lets you go until long after the last note of the Liebestod has died away. Bohm (often accused of being kapellmeisterish at the time) is electric - the music ebbs and flows with the passion of the protagonists, at times whipped up to almost hysterical proportions (Tristan's Act 2 arrival and the height of his dementia in Act 3 for example), at others achingly lonely (Marke's monologue or the shepherd's piping come to mind).

The singing, too, is unsurpassed. Nilsson and Windgassen are in superlative form throughout - Windgassen tired in Act 3? His character is dying, for God's sake - and he certainly rises to the excitements of Isolde's arrival and the ripping of the bandages from his wound. Christa Ludwig sings Brangane's warnings from the tower with a haunting rapture that matches that of the lovers downstage. The much-missed Martti Talvela sings his (presumably huge) socks off as Marke, turning a character who can be a bore into, for his moment, the most sympathetic and moving person in the opera.

I've never got it with Furtwangler and Flagstad by the time of that performance sounded too maternal for my taste. Bernstein is brave and at times fascinating but his cast aren't as good. Karajan is too overcooked and Vickers - often a great Tristan on stage - was too self-indulgent here.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By The Cultural Observer on November 3, 2005
Format: Audio CD
It is very hard to try to write a recommendation for a perfect recording of Tristan und Isolde, since each set has its own set of pros and cons. However, of all the Tristans I have listened to, Karl Böhm's recording made at 1966 in Bayreuth seems to be the one that I come back to the most. There was a time when I could not appreciate Böhm's conducting because I felt that he rushed through the lucid and erotic qualities of the score. When I listen to this now, with fresher ears and having listened to the majority of Tristan recordings on the market, I find that his conducting gives Tristan an electricity that cannot be found in other recordings. There is a passion and energy that you can find in Böhm's conducting that you cannot hear in Karajan's or Solti's interpretations, and this set definitely tops Berstein's and Kleiber's recording in many respects. The orchestra plays beautifully under his direction, just as they did in the Ring for Böhm exactly a year later. I would say that the conductor's reading of the score is full of energy, passion, eroticism, forward propulsion and movement, and pathos. The conductor's somewhat Mozartian/ classical treatment of the Romantic and chord-saturated score gives it a lift and an elegance without sacrificing the Wagnerian ethos that make it so special. I would say that this is the most masterfully conducted Tristan, and adding to that the special Bayreuth sound and you have one of the most orchestrally captivating experiences you'll ever hear.

However, the one factor that places this Tristan above all other recordings is the amazing cast assembled in this massive project. Birgit Nilsson, in my opinion, is the greatest Isolde...period.
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