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A Walk Across the Sun Hardcover – January 3, 2012


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: SilverOak; 1St Edition edition (January 3, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1402792808
  • ISBN-13: 978-1402792809
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.6 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (307 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #81,012 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Addison’s debut is an international thriller about the shadowy world of child trafficking. During the 2005 tsunami, sheltered Indian teenagers Ahalya and Sita are orphaned and fall through the cracks into the criminal underworld. As they struggle to comprehend their situation, attorney Thomas Clarke, halfway across the globe, faces a personal and professional crisis that sends him off to India to work as a lawyer for an international agency focused on sex trafficking. When a brothel raid nets Ahalya but not her sister, Thomas sets off on a personal quest to find the missing teenager. The slowish start is made up for with plenty of action and travel in the second half of the story, as Thomas closes in on Sita, and the traffickers do their best to keep her hidden. Clarke’s quest requires more than a little suspension of disbelief, but it offers an insightful take on the all-too-real problems of international human trafficking. --Jessica Moyer

Review

"Addison has written a novel that is beautiful in its story and also important in its message. A Walk Across the Sun deserves a wide audience." --John Grisham
 
“Plenty of action and travel …an insightful take on the all-too-real problems of international human trafficking. “--Booklist Online
 
“Chilling, suspenseful, and powerful…The story is compelling, but the message is greater and will leave an impact on everyone who picks up the book. Readers will mourn the injustices depicted and celebrate the triumphs long after the last page is turned.”-Library Journal
 
"[An] ambitious compassionate debut." --Christian Science Monitor
 
“A pulse-revving novel with a serious message.” --O, The Oprah Magazine

More About the Author

Corban Addison is the author of the international bestselling novels, A Walk Across the Sun and The Garden of Burning Sand, which address international human rights issues within the framework of deeply researched and compelling human stories. An attorney, activist, and world traveler, he is a supporter of numerous humanitarian causes, including the abolition of modern slavery, gender-based violence, and HIV/AIDS. He lives with his wife and children in Virginia.

Customer Reviews

Popular Discussion Topics

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  • "Writing" 41
  • "Emotional" 22
  • "Characters" 18
  • "Action" 8
  • "Suspense" 3
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

101 of 106 people found the following review helpful By Nathan Hagerty on December 19, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It's the sign of an incredible book that when it finishes, you have that butterflies-in-your-stomach feeling of closure, redemption and beauty. And that's what happens when you read this book. I read this as an ARC provided by the publishing company, but just bought it on Amazon so I could give it away to friends.

Some readers might say that this is a "hard book to read", and that's true--at first. Coming face-to-face with the gritty realities of the horrendous trade in young girls is difficult. But Addison deftly weaves a tale of beauty and redemption throughout. It reads like a thriller, but has the soul of poetic lyricism.

This might be a small spoiler, but I believe knowing this fact, actually, greatly improves the read -- it ends with goodness. It's not a "pat" ending, and all of the twists and turns of the story contribute to an overall effect of depth and reality. So the "happy" ending -- rather than being cliche or saccharine -- comes off as a picture of redemption. Yes, I know I've used that word a few times, but there's no better descriptor for how this book feels. Redemptive.

Thriller fans will be delighted. Those who want a story with poetic beauty will be moved. The (on-the-ground) research makes you feel like you are walking the streets of Mumbai or Paris -- and the characterization is strong.

I can't more highly recommend this book!
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Loving Life on January 4, 2012
Format: Hardcover
What to say about Corban Addison's first novel, A Walk Across the Sun?

I am not much of a reader of "thrillers," mainly because I find so many of the characters to be one dimensional and the plots way too far-fetched. But Corban Addison combines the mind of a top notch investigator with the soul of a poet. This is one well-written beautifully nuanced book. He uses the power of a fictional world to paint a compelling picture of a monstrous problem that is all but hidden from the view of most Americans. We would frankly rather not think about the exploitation of young girls and would love to be able to relegate it to some remote corner of the third world.

But Addison starts right here in our own country with the abduction of a young girl in broad daylight, an abduction that his main character, Thomas Clarke, is powerless to stop. From there Clarke is drawn into a world of intrigue and danger, into the plight of two sisters kidnapped after losing both parents to a violent tsunami. Compelled to help, Clarke is drawn into the sexual cesspools of Bombay and Paris, and finally, full circle to our own back yard as he strives to rescue the younger sister from the brutal soulless world of sex slavers, dope pushers and pimps. He leaves no stone unturned and by the end of the book I found myself wrung out, the pages of the book tearstained and a rage rising within me that I hope never goes out.

Addison never preaches. Nor does he sensationalize with too much detail of the sexual abuses endured by his characters, although he certainly could have. He just tells one hell of a good story that left this reader wanting to know more about how to help. It's quite simply a wonderful first novel.

Buy, it, read it, pass it on to your friends, talk about it in book clubs.
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46 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Gemjennc on December 31, 2011
Format: Hardcover
When I think of this book, all the reviewer's cliches apply: fast-paced, suspenseful, page-turning, heart-thumping, stayed-up-late-reading, etc. I'm not typically a fan of thrillers--too often they sacrifice character study for the sake of moving the plot along. But I admire the effort Addison took to give readers a realistic tableaux whether we were reading about the doomed family in Chennai, the hidden neighborhood of Indian restaurants in Paris, or the truck stops in Harrisburg, PA. We care...moreWhen I think of this book, all the reviewer's cliches apply: fast-paced, suspenseful, page-turning, heart-thumping, stayed-up-late-reading, etc. I'm not typically a fan of thrillers--too often they sacrifice character study for the sake of moving the plot along. But I admire the effort Addison took to give readers a realistic tableaux whether we were reading about the doomed family in Chennai, the hidden neighborhood of Indian restaurants in Paris, or the truck stops in Harrisburg, PA. We care about the two orphan girls, Ahalya and Sita Ghai, right from the start because of the details he gives us about their lives before disaster strikes (in fact, I wouldn't have minded a little more of that). Addison reveals to the reader the grim realities of an underworld that we associate with movies but that is actually happening--and not just in places like India and the Philippines. Human trafficking--particularly of young girls--is modern slavery, and Addison does here what artists do best: he gives a human face to the victims that are otherwise invisible in our society.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Sandra K. Stiles on January 8, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Those of us not familiar with the sex trade, me being one of those, usually think of it as happening "someplace else". The reality is that it happens all over the world, including right here in the United States. Children are sold for drugs, prostitution, kidnapped right off of the street. Before you go any further in this review you need to know that this is not a feel good topic. It is repulsive and hard to read.
We start off the story with two innocent girls whose life is decimated due to a tsunami. They try to get to their school where the sisters will take care of them. Things go wrong and they find themselves where no young person should ever be, in the sex trade. Thomas Clarke is a lawyer who has lost so much already. He witnesses a kidnapping of a young girl in a park and this sets him on his mission to work against these traffickers.

This story moves along smoothly carrying the reader from one heartbreak to another. It is a very emotional book to read. It lets you see inside the head and heart of these people who sell children for sex. I think it was best said when one of the characters said to the young girl he had with him, "You are not here because I enjoy the sale of sex. You are here because men enjoy the purchase of it." (page 329)
I thought about that remark. If we could get rid of all of the people who were willing to pay for this service then we would not have the sex trade.

As the author took us across India we get a look at the different caste systems and the way they treat people. Both of these girls were middle class students who knew English. This made them more valuable than many others. The author doesn't leave the reader in a depressive state.
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