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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most chilling Scudder novel to date.
Matthew Scudder is Lawrence Block's remarkable private investigator. He's a former NYPD detective who left the force after an accident left a child dead in crossfire. Because he is unlicensed you can't "hire" him. Instead he does you a favor by taking your case and solving the crime. "Walk among the Tombstones," is one of the most chilling of all...
Published on December 2, 1998 by Harold L. Laroff

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Average at Best
Run of the mill detective story with shocking mutilation scenes. Wait for the movie which I think is about to be released.
Published 16 days ago by Paul W Foerst


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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most chilling Scudder novel to date., December 2, 1998
This review is from: A Walk Amoung the Tombstones: A Matthew Scudder Crime Novel (Mass Market Paperback)
Matthew Scudder is Lawrence Block's remarkable private investigator. He's a former NYPD detective who left the force after an accident left a child dead in crossfire. Because he is unlicensed you can't "hire" him. Instead he does you a favor by taking your case and solving the crime. "Walk among the Tombstones," is one of the most chilling of all the Scudder novels to date. Other reviews here have said it's dark and brooding. This I agree. A drug dealer to find out who kidnapped and killed his wife hires Scudder. Even though drug dealers are low on Scudder's list even they deserve justice. Block introduces several new characters, the Kongs, a pair of teenage hackers who break into the telephone company's computers and a streetwise African-American kid who goes by the name T.J. This kid has real spunk is a very likeable character I hope Block and Scudder keep around for a while. Other characters that have been in past novels are off to Ireland. Elaine, Scudder's, call-girl friend who he has had more than a passing interest in comes center stage as a lover. Read one Scudder novel is not unlike eating potato chips. You just can't read just one. I've got others sitting on my table waiting to be read.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Scudder Takes a Walk, June 23, 2001
Lawrence Block's amazing Matthew Scudder series maintains a very high level of quality considering the number of novels. "A Walk Among the Tombstones," follows "A Dance at the Slaughterhouse," which was one of the best novels in the series. "Tombstones" is not quite as good, largely due to an ending that is not as satisfying, but it is hardly a dud. In "Tombstones," a drug dealer whose wife was kidnapped and hideously murdered hires Scudder to track down the perpetrators. Scudder quickly discovers that the deed was the work of a team of serial killers who have decided to turn their "fun" into profit. Like most novels in the Scudder series, this one is dark and obssessed with death. It seems that even as the alcoholic Scudder gets more of a firm handle on his sobriety and his life, his cases get uglier. Recurring characters in this novel are the street kid T.J., the police detective Joe Durkin, the eccentric informant Danny Boy Bell and call girl Elaine Mardell, who has become the love of Scudder's life. In fact, "Tombstone" features a key moment in Scudder's developing relationship with Elaine.
Overall, this is not the best novel in the Scudder series, but it is still well written and highly satisifying.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Both funny and horrifying, and that ain't easy to accomplish, March 29, 2012
Like all continuing-character fiction series, some of the books featuring Matt Scudder are better than others, though they're all pretty good. Of those I've read so far, this one ranks near the top of the list. Matt is just floating through life for awhile, minding his own business, spending time with his favorite lady, and picking up a little work here and there (enough to meet his modest needs), when he's contacted by a heroin trafficker whose brother he knows though AA. The guy's wife was kidnapped and a large ransom demanded, which the husband paid -- and then the wife's body was returned in small packages. The dealer can't go to the cops, naturally, but he wants the people who tortured his wife to death and took his money. Scudder has to employ rather more ingenuity this time; he often just walks around Manhattan, talking to people, until something shakes loose, but he really has to focus when the torturers turn out to be serial killers of much longer standing. And then, just as he thinks he's come to the end of the line with a solution he's not entirely happy about, another kidnapping takes place and Scudder becomes the pivotal person in the exchange.

It's almost as if Block were deliberately showing off his many talents. The plot and the narrative both can jerk you up, down, and sideways, going from very funny dialogue (especially the phone-company-hacking Kongs in the hotel room) to absolutely horrific descriptions within a few pages. He has also brought together a variety of his most interesting characters, including Danny Boy Bell, the albino with information, and TJ, the street-wise black kid with the "Brooks Brothers voice." We also learn a lot more about Elaine, the smart, successful hooker who has been an increasingly important factor in Scudder's life for years. And, as always, the world of alcohol and drugs, and those who are trying to escape from it, inform much of the story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good Scudder, but not a classic, October 23, 2002
A very gritty and black entry into the series of the former alkie but still unlicensed private eye. In this book, Scudder is hired by a drug dealer to find the sadistic spree killers who kidnapped and butchered his wife. With the help of his street connections, Scudder decides to mete out some more of the rough justice that is becoming his trademark. But lest he become a remorseless killing machine, Block allows Scudder to begin to craft some domestic bliss at the end of this saga. It's a fine read, because Block is always entertaining. A few points distract from the story. One is unfortunate timing; the book is dated, with its labyrinthine plot to get ahold of a phone number that today could be obtained by the police without a second thought, and most civilians who have the technology. Block uses a pair of teenage hackers as the tools for this caper, and it seems like Block's stretching, trying to get into the big "thing" of the early '90s. Clearly Block's not on familiar ground, plot- or dialogue-wise. He should stick to cynical thugs and world-weary cops. The other point is that this book has a lot of black humor of the particularly morbid variety. The Scudder that I'm familiar with wouldn't have made a joke about a woman getting her breast cut off (in A Dance At the Slaughterhouse, his reaction to torture was appropriately grim). Maybe now that Scudder's found love, he's light hearted enough tocrack about torture and mutiliation, but I'm not sure I like it.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mystery/adventure novel, March 7, 2013
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As usual, Lawrence Block has a knack of keeping the reader interested in the action taking place until the very end of the book.
The story is well written, the characters are believable and the action moves at a steady pace.
Matt Scudder is a likable individual who has human failings. The only objection I have about the Matt Scudder series of books is the constant use of a vulgar swear word in the characters' conversations. I've often wondered If the author thought that its use made the novel more realistic--- for me, it doesn't. It distracts. However, I recommend the Matt Scudder series for any one who is interested in well written stories with excellent plots.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Winner, June 7, 2005
By 
Lulu (Hamilton, OH USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: A Walk Amoung the Tombstones: A Matthew Scudder Crime Novel (Mass Market Paperback)
If there is a better living crime novelist than Lawrence Block, I'd like to know who it is. I have yet to read a Scudder story that did not have me riveted! Having only recently discovered this series, every time I read another one it is deemed my new "favorite."

So, until I finish "Time to Murder and Create", which is excellent so far, "A Walk Among the Tombstones" is my favorite to date - vicious killers, flawed protagonists, interesting secondary characters and lots of action - what more could you want? I am a big fan of the Lawrence Sanders Commandment and Deadly Sin series so now that he is gone, I am glad that there are so many Scudder books yet to be read and savored. By the way, I have not read these books in any kind of order and it makes absolutely no difference!
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Block's Story Rings So True, You'd Think That This Was Not Fiction And That He Was Really There, September 28, 2012
By 
Bill Bernico (Cleveland, Wisconsin) - See all my reviews
I'm a bit of a computer geek myself, so when I read the part where King Kong (Mr. King and Mr. Hong) helped Scudder by hacking into computer systems around New York, I could almost picture myself sitting there alongside them. And that teenage character, T.J. is a perfect sidekick, so to speak, for Scudder. They play off each other very well, and that's final, Lionel. Also, I've always been big on happy endings and although this wasn't such a happy ending for the kidnappers, I was glad to see that they got what was coming to them at the end of the story. Block's dialog is also right on the money. It flows so smoothly and feels so natural. I learned a lot about writing dialog just by reading Block's novels. And this is one I've read half a dozen times. I never tire of it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Scudder Success, November 2, 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: A Walk Amoung the Tombstones: A Matthew Scudder Crime Novel (Mass Market Paperback)
Block has created one of the best serial mystery characters with Matt Scudder and this book is no exception to the series success. The reason behind this success is Block's easy writing style and his atmospheric descritions of New York. In this installment, after some reluctance, Scudder decides to take the case of drug dealer who's wife was kidnapped and killed. A dark, brooding book, it shows the seamier side of the world, but also gives us portraits of some interesting supporting characters.
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5.0 out of 5 stars amazing !!!!, July 11, 2014
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Suspense, romance, and more! A few situations that one could relate to his/her life. I read this cause of the movie trailer, now it makes me want to read the other books.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Grime, Grit, Guns. And genius. Lots of genius, July 8, 2014
Walk Among the Tombstones is Matthew Scudder in his element, somewhere in the late 80s or pre-Guiliani 90s. He uses pay phones. His assistant, a street smart teen, has a beeper. And Scudder & Company must rely on ingenuity, luck and legwork (with the occasional rudimentary hacking team) to bring a kidnapped woman back to her very dangerous husband. The dialogue crackles with authenticity, and the bygone New York grime and danger that permeate Times Square are almost a delight. Unless, of course, you remember living through the 1980s when crime and murder spiraled out of control. If you read any Lawrence Block Scudder novel, this is the one.
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A Walk Amoung the Tombstones: A Matthew Scudder Crime Novel
A Walk Amoung the Tombstones: A Matthew Scudder Crime Novel by Lawrence Block (Mass Market Paperback - November 1, 1993)
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