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Walk in Shadows Paperback – October, 2003

7 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 260 pages
  • Publisher: Dominion (October 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1930997361
  • ISBN-13: 978-1930997363
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,174,726 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Nicholas Kaufmann is the Bram Stoker Award-nominated, ITW Thriller Award-nominated, and Shirley Jackson Award-nominated author of Walk In Shadows: Collected Stories, General Slocum's Gold, Hunt at World's End, Chasing the Dragon, Still Life: Nine Stories, Dying Is My Business, and Die and Stay Dead. Over the years, he worked in publishing, owned his own bookstore, managed a video store, and was a development associate for a well-known literary and film agent. He lives in Brooklyn, New York with his wife and two ridiculous cats.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By "d-g-k" on December 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
If short stories are one of your favorite guilty pleasures you owe it to yourself to check out the first collection by Nicholas Kaufmann. And ignore the phrase "first collection" if it suggests a lack of depth and maturity, Kaufmann's work spans several countries expertly using setting to reflect themes and his writing touches on topics from McCarthyism to modern urban angst in a way that reflects each era he selects. He entertains Baby Boomers and their children with equal ease.
"The Jew of Prague" alone makes this book worth reading. Like all the stories in this collection, it's complexity and depth are the subtext of a compelling tale. The reader constantly wants to know what happens next.
Most of these stories have (unfortunately) appeared previously in small niche markets cheating Kaufmann out of the wide readership his works deserve.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Craig Clarke VINE VOICE on December 17, 2004
Format: Paperback
Despite what some reviewers would have you think, it's really not very often that a debut fiction collection comes along that trumpets an exciting new talent (at least new to me). I've probably only read three so far in my life. The first was Soft and Others by F. Paul Wilson, then more recently there was Douglas Clegg's The Nightmare Chronicles. Now, add Nicholas Kaufmann to that list. With Walk in Shadows, he shows a sure hand at horror, from the psychological profile ("Not That Kind of Story") to the kinetic escape (aptly titled "Go!").

There are several highlights in Kaufmann's debut collection (culled from several magazines and anthologies of which mainstream readers have likely never heard), beginning with "The Jew of Prague." This story starts out as a simple jewel heist and turns into something else. The atmosphere is the strongest point of this story and Kaufmann layers it on with gusto. Similarly, "VIP Room" is the most disturbingly sexy story I've read since Dan Simmons' "Dying in Bangkok" (as published in Lovedeath) and that is mostly due to Kaufmann's skill at setting the scene properly.

Unlike many authors, who seem to tread similar ground over and over, Kaufmann doesn't write the same kind of story (although many of them take place in his Quick City); each has a different tone -- and, surprisingly often, a different voice -- from the preceding one. This allows him to excel as the first-person narrator, since his "author's voice" is completely absorbed into the character (one prime example is with "Better Off with the Blues").
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 6, 2003
Format: Paperback
Nicholas Kaufmann's book of eleven stories is the best kind of horror short fiction. Kaufmann doesn't stint on violence of the realistic or supernatural kind: "Street Cred" is about brutal gang members and their involvement with "dirtwalkers," while "The Dead Stay Dead" is about a hit man's encounter with a female victim. But his stories are frightening in the best way -- through the unexpected, yet completely realistic turns his characters take. That it's Kaufmann's first collection is surprising: confident in his use of genres, locations and character types, he's a skillful entertainer.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 29, 2004
Format: Paperback
When I read this book I wasn't able to understand it all the way. I had to ask my mom what some of the big words meant like the word "necrophelia" and the word "corpulent." But, after she told me what they meant I started to like it some. Then, my friends and I got together and acted out a few of the stories in my room.
After that I realized how brilliant this book really was. Reading it is like having a demon stab you down there with a corn cob holder. I know because it happened to me and I read this book! Talk about embarassing. Not the book.
My favorite story is the one where Ronald McDonald decides to make all his hamburgers from fat people. He goes to the casting call for one of those "Sweating to the Oldies" videos with a big truck and a cattle prod. The funniest joke is when he figures out how many quarter pounders he can make by dividing a fat guy's weight by four.
That was the best.
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