Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Walk Through Wales Paperback – August 1, 1993


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$5.98 $0.01
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 290 pages
  • Publisher: Perennial (August 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061180084
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061180088
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,572,567 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this newest of his engaging travel accounts, British New Yorker writer Bailey ( The Outer Banks ) extends an invitation to join him on a three-week-long, cross-country ramble in spring from the Welsh capital, Cardiff, to Bangor on the north coast. Enhanced by relevant, never pedantic, lore, his account surveys the singular character of this history- and legend-rich land of Roman forts, Norman castles and medieval cathedrals as he hikes along old Roman roads and drovers' trails, up hills and fog-bound peaks, across former coal mining valleys and towns, and as he skirts bogs and rivers. On the road and in pubs, inns and bed-and-board lodgings, Bailey encounters sheep farmers and shearers, a printer turned explosives expert, a retired bus driver now raising goats, the cleric-poet R. J. Thomas, and a fervent nationalist waitress who is one of many Welsh fighting to preserve both a land and a language threatened by an influx of outsiders.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Anthony Bailey is the author of many books of fiction and non-fiction. He has also written two volumes of autobiography and contributes to The New Yorker. He lives in Greenwich, London. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 31, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is the ultimate arm chair traveling book. It is a great introduction to Wales: the landscape, culture and history. I have yet to visit Wales, but I dream of taking the exact route as A. Bailey. I highly recommend this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
An excellent, if too brief, overview of not only a walking tour across Wales, but a straightforward look at the impact that English culture, media, language, and incomers are having upon the Cambrian heartlands. As my sympathies are with the Celts here and not the Saxons, perhaps I wish that Bailey had taken the side of the underdog more often. Read Ned Thomas' "The Welsh Extremist" from one of Bailey's key interviewees, a noted critic, for a pro-nationalist (obviously) counter-argument.

Being pre-1997 with the arrival of devolution, this account may be a bit dated. However, Bailey--as an English writer now living in NYC--takes pains to present both the nationalists and the newcomers in as fair a light as he can, and his even-handedness provides readers with an honest examination of not only the natural beauties, very well-described especially in the mountain and moor scenes, but the human conflicts that still mark the Welsh landscape, home of the indigenous British. You truly feel the isolation when Bailey scales the hills and tells what he saw.

This book may not sound, given its title, like a travelogue so much as one of those more innocuous sight-seeing, walk to the teahouse and back guides, but Bailey does make an effort, as his own list of sources shows, to update George Borrow's Victorian itinerary published as "Wild Wales" nearly a century and a half later. Jan Morris' "The Matter of Wales" deals with a lot of the same terrain in more panoramic and admittedly perhaps sentimental prose. Bailey, less loyal to any notion of patriotism, gives a more sober, pedestrian-level, accessible, introduction to many Welsh issues still vexed in our supposedly post-colonial era.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Linda Pagliuco VINE VOICE on February 24, 2008
Format: Paperback
Wales is a lovely, hilly, compact nation with much to recommend it, including great history, legend, scenery, and people. Anthony Bailey encountered many interesting people and places in his 3 week trek, but didn't seem particularly inspired by any of them. It's hard to imagine how a writer with Bailey's reputation could make such a fascinating country sound so dull and monotonous, but he's done exactly that. Perhaps it was all that walking. Wales is difficult enough to traverse by car, with all its narrow winding roads, but time and effort are rewarded with such places as St Winifred's medieval well and the breathtakingly high Pontcysyllte Aqueduct. Here's hoping that readers planning to visit aren't turned off by this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search