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Walking the Choctaw Road: Stories From Red People Memory Paperback – April 1, 2005


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Walking the Choctaw Road: Stories From Red People Memory + Native American Tribes: The History and Culture of the Choctaw + The Choctaws in Oklahoma: From Tribe to Nation, 1855-1970 (American Indian Law and Policy Series)
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 - 15 years
  • Grade Level: 7 - 9
  • Paperback: 152 pages
  • Publisher: Cinco Puntos Press (April 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0938317733
  • ISBN-13: 978-0938317739
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #197,723 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 8 Up–Tim Tingle, Choctaw storyteller, performs his own collection of 12 stories from his book of the same title. His resonant and warm voice, leavened with occasional accents and colored by characters' varying moods, offers immediate intimacy and accessibility to listeners who learn more than a bit of history as well as enjoy several fanciful spins through folklore. The plots here range widely from the Trail of Tears and a slave escape to world mythology and Tingle's own adolescence during the Vietnam War era. Each CD presents three stories in their entirety and is clearly marked with the track number at which each begins. Tingle's presentation is elegant in its simplicity, and he provides ample contextual details to promote full comprehension of his characters' dilemmas and personal victories without those same details seeming the least pedagogic. For all public and school collections, this audiobook can be satisfyingly promoted for both curricular and entertainment uses.–Francisca Goldsmith, Berkeley Public Library, CA --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

From Booklist

Gr. 6-12. A true talespinner celebrates his heritage with 11 absorbing yarns drawn, recombined, and retold from oral sources. Tales of shape-shifters and healing magic share space with stories about tragedy and miracles along the Trail of Tears and about prejudice, friendship, and incidents that illuminate traditional Choctaw values and cultural practices. In "Trail of Tears," a child carries his mother's bones on his journey of forced migration; in "The Choctaw Way," a killer teaches an orphan a moral lesson by willingly paying the price for his crime. Sophisticated narrative devices and some subtle character nuances give these stories a literary cast, but the author's evocative language, expert pacing, and absorbing subject matter will rivet readers and listeners both. In a long introduction, which might have been better placed at the end, Tingle pays tribute to his sources and discusses motifs and historical events central to the Choctaw people. John Peters
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 15 customer reviews
A wonderful book, easy to read, very personal and accessible.
jebaer
A lot of good messages in the stories Tim Tingle relays in the book, "Walking the Choctaw Road." It is a good history lesson as well.
D. Rogers
She said its good alabit for YA as stated but still interesting.
Susan Marschall

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on August 9, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Written by acclaimed Choctaw storyteller Tim Tingle, Walking The Choctaw Road is a delightfully presented, inherently entertaining, and thoughtfully informative collection of original tales drawn from personal, mythical, and oral accounts. Written in a down-to-earth, highly accessible style, Walking The Choctaw Road is a joy to read, embracing tribal traditions with wry humor, enhanced with liberal highlights of both energy and excitement. Walking The Choctaw Road is an enthusiastically recommended contribution to personal reading lists and Native American Studies collections.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 4, 2004
Format: Hardcover
After marrying into a Choctaw family, I wanted to learn more about my husband's culture. These stories are a great representation to describe where the Choctaw have come from and what experiences have made them who they are today. My only complaint is that the book is too short! Now my appetite is whetted for more.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By jebaer on December 30, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I originally heard these stories read by Tim Tingle. The book is very good on its own but hearing the stories makes them come alive. A wonderful book, easy to read, very personal and accessible. Appropriate for adults and older children, I gave this book to my teen-age son for Christmas.

The photos in the book were chosen carefully, they reflect what people wore, how they looked and lived. The illustrations by Choctaw artist Norma Howard are exceptional as well.

The only caveat is this is storytelling, fiction, not every word should be considered historical fact.
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Format: Paperback
Walking the Choctaw Road is a book filled with tales told from tongue to tongue, and heard generation after generation. Oral history and the beauty of a culture that makes the time to pass on wisdom, dreams, legends through communication, in person communication. Tingle grasps ancient tribal memories, supernatural events, and historical accounts to further the heritage of the present day Choctaw people. Walking the Choctaw Road contains eleven stories that give a glimpse into the core of the strength and desire to endure of the Choctaw people.

Tim Tingle doesn't leave out the horrors, the sadness or the tale of the journey, he embraces the devastation just as much as the victory as all being of equal importance to the generations to come. In a world of immediate gratification, I see the value in learning to wait, being patient, and not getting everything you want exactly when you first want it.

There is something magical in hearing words passed on which have endured generation after generation. I hope to someday have a chance to sit in on a storytelling, but for now I am satisfied with Tim Tingle and reading Walking the Choctaw Road. I enjoyed reading the stories, it holds and as I read I could imagine myself sitting listening to a master storyteller, with a deep voice and pacing slightly. This was a great read!

For all of my reivews go to B&b ex libris:[...]
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Format: Paperback
The story tellers of the Choctaw people passed down to us 11 stories reflecting the heart, soul, faith,disappointments,and hope of the native people.They described both the joys and tragic history of living under a federal government that disrespected and denied them their traditions, language,and culture. The power of the story teller reclaims their heritage.Take that walk down the Choctaw road as I did and you will enjoy it.
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By T. Rosenbaum on December 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is an easy to read yet poetically significant history of the stories of the Choctaw Nation. Some of them made me laugh, and others brought me to tears. I've been raised to appreciate the struggles my ancestors went through on the Trail of Tears, but Mr. Tingle's story of the boy who carries his Mother's bone bundle not only brought me to tears but has stayed with me. A must read!
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By D. Rogers on June 17, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A lot of good messages in the stories Tim Tingle relays in the book, "Walking the Choctaw Road." It is a good history lesson as well.
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Recently learned of my Choctaw heritage and became a tribal member.
Anxious to learn more about the Choctaw history. The book was fair, I was interested in
in learning more about their daily lives.
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More About the Author

Tim Tingle is an Oklahoma Choctaw and an award-winning author and storyteller. His great-great grandfather, John Carnes, walked the Trail of Tears in 1835, and his paternal grandmother attended a series of rigorous Indian boarding schools in the early 1900's. Responding to a scarcity of Choctaw lore, Tingle began collecting tribal stories in the early 90's.
In 1992, Tingle began mentoring with Choctaw storyteller Charley Jones. He retraced the Trail of Tears to Choctaw homelands in Mississippi and began recording stories of tribal elders. His family experiences and these interviews with fellow Choctaws in Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, and Oklahoma----and surprise encounters with Choctaws as far away as Bethel, Alaska----are the basis of his most important writings.
His latest middle grade novel, HOW I BECAME A GHOST, (Roadrunner Press, June 2013), pulls heavily from these interviews. It is a fictional first-person account of a young boy who "becomes a ghost" on the Trail of Tears, but stays on the walk to help family and friends survive. Filled with humor and elements of traditional lore to soften the tragedy, HIBaG includes a shape-shifting panther/teenager, a five-year old ghost sister, a talking dog, and a headstrong teenage girl who refuses to give up. In the June 28 issue of Kirkus, HOW I BECAME A GHOST received a Starred Review, Tingle's first!
Also, in late June of 2013, DANNY BLACKGOAT, NAVAJO PRISONER will be released. A HiLo novel, for teens who read on a more basic level, this tale follows the misadventures of a tough sixteen year-old on the Navajo Long Walk of 1864. Danny fights bullying soldiers, rattlesnakes, and his own fiery temper, till he meets an older prisoner who devises a dangerous escape plan.
HOUSE OF PURPLE CEDAR, Tingle's first adult novel, is set for release in January of 2014. Fifteen years in the crafting, this novel describes the struggles of Choctaws in pre-statehood Oklahoma, through the eyes of a young girl who witnesses the burning down of New Hope Academy boarding school. Filled with hope in the most tragic of circumstance, HoPC is Tingle's testiment to Choctaw elders who continue to watch over the well-being of the Choctaw Nation and its people. An adventure novel with strong elements of magic realism, HOUSE OF PURPLE CEDAR is already generating much interest among reviewers.
Every Labor Day, Tingle performs a Choctaw story before Chief Gregory Pyle's State of the Nation Address, a gathering that attracts over ninety thousand tribal members and friends. In June of 2011, Tingle spoke at the Library of Congress and presented his first performance at the Kennedy Center, in Washington, D.C. He was also a tribal storyteller at "Choctaw Days," a celebration honoring the Oklahoma Choctaws at the Smithsonian. He has been a featured storyteller at festivals in forty-two states, including five appearances at the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough, Tennessee.
From 1986-1990, Tingle took regular trips to Mexico, collecting Hispanic ghost stories. He spent his summers in intensive language schools in Cuernavaca and San Miguel de Allende, obtaining a level of fluency in Spanish. Many folktales he learned from these journeys appear in his books for middle school readers, including three versions of "La Llorona." This tale is one of his most requested oral performance pieces.
Tingle received his Masters Degree in English Literature at the University of Oklahoma in 2003, with a focus on American Indian studies. While teaching freshmen writing courses and completing his thesis, "Choctaw Oral Literature," Tingle wrote his first book, Walking the Choctaw Road. It was selected by both Oklahoma and Alaska on the "One Book, One State" program, and was read by students and adults in communities throughout these states. The Anchorage Daily News sponsored Tingle on a two-week tour of Alaskan cities, including remote towns accessible only by sled and frozen rivers in the nine-month winter. WTCR is now studied at universities across the United States and abroad.
As a visiting author and performer, Tingle reaches audiences numbering over 200,000 annually. In 2009, he received a fellowship to write and produce a documentary film, "The Choctaw Lighthorsemen," a historical look at the tribal police force. The film premiered in Honolulu in September of 2011. He has completed eleven speaking tours for the U.S. Department of Defense, performing stories to children of military personnel stationed in Germany.
His first children's book, Crossing Bok Chitto, (Cinco Puntos Press, 2005), garnered over twenty state and national awards, including Best Children's Book from the American Indian Library Association, and was an Editor's Choice in the New York Times Book Review.
In 2010, Tingle welcomed the release of two books; Saltypie, a children's illustrated story of his childhood. Salty was awarded BEST CHILDREN'S BOOK from the American Indian Library Association. Also in 2010, Tingle contributed a story, "Rabbit's Tail Tale," to a multiple award-winning anthology, TRICKSTER.
MORE SPOOKY TEXAS TALES, the second in this series from Texas Tech Press (2009 release), includes scary stories for the 4-7th grade reader, set in modern times: Goth big sisters, runaways, Chupacabra prowlings, La Llorona at a San Antonio wedding, and suburban night-frights. Spooky Texas Tales, released in 2008, has won multiple awards.
For the adult reader, Tingle's short story, "Six Dead Cabbies," appears in the long-awaited anthology, LONE STAR NOIRE, set for a November release at the Texas Book Festival, on the grounds of the state capitol.
And....for fans of CROSSING BOK CHITTO, Tingle has completed a three-book series for the Young Adult reader, describing the adventures of Martha Tom and Lil Mo AFTER the miracle crossing. Expect a dose of kid-friendly American Indian history and Choctaw lore, including witchery, good and bad, evil death owls, snake people, and little men of the swamps and forests. No release date has been set for this exciting series.
For Tingle newcomers, Tim is an enrolled member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. His great-great grandfather, John Carnes, walked the Trail of Tears in 1835. From 2002 to the present, Tingle has performed a traditional Choctaw story before Chief Gregory Pyle's Annual State of the Nation Address at the tribal gathering in Tushkahoma, Oklahoma, a Choctaw reunion that attracts over 90 thousand people!
Tim completed his B.A. degree in English Literature from the University of Texas in 1975, and in 2003 received his M.A. in Native American Studies from the University of Oklahoma (football Saturdays are very interesting!). His stories are inspired by his own childhood and life experiences, and interviews he has conducted with Choctaws in Mississippi, Oklahoma, Texas, and Alabama over the last twenty years. Since the publication of his first book in 2003, the multiple award-winning WALKING THE CHOCTAW ROAD, Tingle has enjoyed a prolific and busy career. When not performing stories and speaking at festivals, universities, and many, many schools of all grade levels, Tingle divides his time between collecting Choctaw lore in Oklahoma and relaxing and writing on the shores of Canyon Lake, Texas. For a complete listing of books, reviews, and awards, visit his website:
timtingle.com