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Walking: A Complete Guide to the Complete Exercise Paperback – February 27, 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; Rep Rev Up edition (February 27, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345491041
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345491046
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #322,411 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Meyers ( Aerobic Walking ) is a man with a mission. He knows that walking is often viewed as the stepchild of aerobic exercise, suitable only for the out-of-shape. And he wants to correct that misconception: in his latest book, he argues that walkers can achieve out of context, 'produce' a clumsy verb "the cardiovascular fitness level and caloric expenditure of a runner without the injuries."44 Meyers also believes that perambulation has a "potential cross-training effect" for people devoted to other sports--skiing, cycling, running, tennis.15 To demonstrate why walking for fitness works, he explains the biomechanics of the evolution of the human gait, with a nod to Lucy, our famous three-million-year-old female forebear.18 He recognizes that a lifetime fitness see below program108 must be sounds like Marxist jargon? simple enough for casual exercisers and yet challenging enough to maintain their interest. His walking program increases aerobic conditioning using intensity (how fast), frequency (how often), and duration (how far).60 In chatty prose, he extols the virtues of gradually increasing one's pace from strolling to brisk walking, with the goal being a 12-minute mile. He also dispenses advice on everything from stretching62 and diet216 to road safety 184 and how to choose a shoe174 . His design for fitness may not be glamorous, but it is inexpensive, easy to follow and practical for people from eight to 80. Author tour.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

In his second book on walking, Meyers ( Aerobic Walking , Random, 1987) goes beyond "how to" and argues for walking's absolute supremacy as a method of weight loss and cardiovascular fitness. He backs up his assertions with scientific evidence, though he admits this evidence often runs counter to much of current thought. His arguments would be more easily acceptable if he did not harp on his feeling that the rest of the world gives walking short shrift (runners, he says, hold walkers in "contempt"), and if he did not see fit to chop down other forms of exercise in order to elevate his own. Still, his book will stimulate some to give walking a try, and Meyers offers sound technical advice. Recommended with reservations for larger exercise collections.
-Jim Burns, Broward Cty. Lib. System, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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See all 22 customer reviews
Well worth reading and following the excellent advice.
redbear
This book is fabulous, exactly what anyone interested in walking for health and fitness needs to get motivated and get walking!
Cameron Moore
I walk 45 to 60 minutes almost every morning and still feel good at the end of the day.
Ray Barnes

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Warren on February 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
After suffering a major heart attack I eventually managed to start walking again and then set a target to jog. This was disappointing until I discovered Casey Myers. This was a whole new ball game as it proved you could exercise at a greater beneficial rate than running with less damage to knees and with far less strain. I have now told many people of the benefits as it is a "fitness Bible" to our family. If you want to be fit and healthy or just look after yourself you must read this book.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 10, 1998
Format: Paperback
Two months ago, I started walking an hour each day. I was starting to experience some discomfort, but didn't want to give up. In layman's terms, Mr. Casey explained what was I was doing wrong & how to correct it. I've lost 15 pounds so far, feel great & plan on walking the rest of my life!
I've tried running, jogging, stair-stepping, stationary bicycles, and aerobic dancing (both high- & low-impact). Chapter 7 compares walking to all the other popular forms of exercise. The comparisons are based on medical research & common sense. If you are short on time, read this chapter. I bet you find time to read the rest of the book AFTER you read this one chapter.
Mr. Casey has regular walking clinics through the Cooper Wellness Program & is the walking consultant for NaturalSport walking shoes.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Ray Barnes on September 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
For anyone who is interested in pursuing a walking program to lose weight and get back in good cardiovascular condition this would be a good place to start. I do not share the author's view that aerobic/fitness walking is the complete exercise and the only exercise a person needs; it is my own opinion that complete fitness should have a balance of cardiovascular exercise, some strength/muscle resistance training, and flexibility. I would argue the panaerobic/heavyhands walking program advocated by Dr. Leonard Schwartz might be the best of all of the above, but for those who are starting out from a very sedentary lifestyle combined with being overweight, the regimen advocated by Casey Meyers could arguably be a better way to go, at least in the short and medium term. I wholeheartedly agree with the author that walking at a high level is as good or better than running at speeds above 5mph and is an excellent cross training exercise for almost any athlete, with less stress on the body and risk of injuries. He also I think rightly points out that people are living a more sedentary life style in recent years which has contributed to an increase in heart problems and a reduction in life expectancy; these health risks can be safely, conveniently and economically addressed by instituting a moderate walking regimen. The recommendations on intensity and duration, to prevent or minimize risk of injury, are very sensible. He is also right in noting that regular brisk walking reduces stress, increases energy, improves appearance, raises metabolism, burns calories, and makes you feel better. I would add (in case he didn't) that it aids digestion. I walk 45 to 60 minutes almost every morning and still feel good at the end of the day.Read more ›
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Harry Phillips on September 19, 2009
Format: Paperback
I agree with the other reviews that fault the author's effort to portray running as an inherently injurious and inappropriate form of exercise.

However, far more egregious is the author's misunderstanding of the bio-mechanics of walking (and running). The reader could do serious damage to himself or herself if the book's description of walking is closely followed.

The author describes the act of walking as one in which the lower leg is extended in front of the body and the weight of the body comes down on the heel. The illustrations and photos in the book show walkers landing on their heels. Unfortunately, this is known as over-striding and results in a braking effect as well as injury to the shins and knees. The proper form is to land mid-foot and roll onto the balls of your feet. This is accomplished by tilting the pelvis forward slightly, taking shorter strides, pushing off your trailing foot when it is behind the body, and landing on the forward foot when it is just about underneath your center of gravity so that when the full weight of your body is on the foot, it is directly underneath you. Try running a few steps landing on your heels. Then try it landing mid-foot. The difference is obvious.

To be fair, the author's (mis)understanding of walking and running was once very common. The book's original publication more than 15 years ago suggests that other information in it may also be seriously outdated.

Oddly and sadly, the author acknowledges that he has had BOTH KNEES replaced. It is almost perverse that the book is based on an understanding of how to walk that can result in severe injury to the knees and that the author has himself been a victim of his own misunderstanding.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 31, 1999
Format: Paperback
A compellation of personal stories that some times seems to be in infomercial for the shoe com-pany he worked for, it never the less contains the clearest explanation of how to walk fast that I have seen. It spends too much time promoting the benefits of walking and otherwise preaching to the choir, but also contains everything you need to know about walking, from stretching to exercises to bio-mechanics to common mistakes. On this topic there are newer books and shorter books, but not better books.
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