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Walking on Earth and Touching the Sky: Poetry and Prose by Lakota Youth at Red Cloud Indian School Hardcover – Bargain Price, April 1, 2012


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Walking on Earth and Touching the Sky: Poetry and Prose by Lakota Youth at Red Cloud Indian School + Gift Horse: A Lakota Story + The Star People: A Lakota Story
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 14 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 9
  • Hardcover: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Abrams Books for Young Readers (April 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1419701797
  • ASIN: B00C2IDLJA
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 8.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,562,972 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Timothy P. McLaughlin teaches Native American youths in schools. He lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico. S. D. Nelson is Lakota and is the author of three previous children’s books for Abrams, including Black Elk’s Vision, an ALA Notable Book. Joseph M. Marshall III is a Lakota actor and writer.

Customer Reviews

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By BookLover on January 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I admire S.D. Nelson's books for children and he continues to enhance book collaborations such as "Walking on Earth and Touching the Sky." The content speaks for itself and is a valuable contribution to understanding the native American experience through the eyes and hearts of its young people. Nelson's illustrations not only unify the book's elements, but also provide a context for understanding the cosmology and world view of the Lakota people
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Thierry on December 23, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
We tend to think that people who are highly creative, intelligent, and gifted, come from metropolitan areas, because they have far more opportunities to expand on their gifts and support to explore their creativity. This children's book just goes to show that the aforementioned qualities can show up anywhere, and in situations that provide limited amounts of stimulation.

The Lakota children writing this book come from an environment that appears barren, to say the least. If you've seen photographs of their reservation, it's easy to see why drug and alcohol addictions are so prevalent. What's so interesting here ,however, is that the lack of stimulation, so widely available in highly populated areas, is not available to these kids, and they tend to be far less precocious as kids in the city, and are very honest about their feelings and how they see their world.

Haiku poetry is a wonderful way to say a great deal in a very few words. The Lakota kids have taken full advantage of the form to create a very apt description of what their inner world is living where they do. I would love to see where the kids are in 10-15 years. People surprise you lots of times. The clear, vivid portrayals of village life presented in this volume, may hint as to the futures of the kids lives down the road.

A well-written picture of modern Native American life on the "rez". Well worth the purchase.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. B. Strain on September 29, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Lakota Youth at Red Cloud Indian School

Walking on Earth & Touching the Sky

Abrams Books for Young Readers, New York, 2012

80 pages.

8+

The poetry and prose of today's Lakota Indian youth is a revelation. Written by youth from 5th to 8th grade attending the Red Cloud Indian School, and edited by Timothy P. McLaughlin, you get a feeling of life on the reservation. Children in this age group are at the edge of becoming adults. They still parrot many of the teachings of their parents and elders, but they are also beginning to think for their selves and challenge the things they are taught.

The conflict of Indian and outside teachings is alive and well in these children. They revel in their Native Pride or "NP" as Ashley Jones writes (36). They also struggle with the state of the reservation. They want a better life, but they live in conflict because they often associate the pursuit of a better life with giving up their NP.

Many of the children simply write the ideas that have been implanted in their minds by their parents, grandparents, and elders. In reading you will see clearly the bitterness of generations passed on again. Occasionally a child will write with such emotion, that you know for sure they are speaking from their own conclusions.

These youth speak with more experience than many of their non-Indian, and non-reservation peers. They see alcohol, drugs, poverty, and death at a much higher rate earlier in life. They are forced to grow up faster than they should. One student, Rayleen Bickerstaff wrote,

Still I'm Loved

When I do something bad, still I'm loved.

When I'm crabby and I'm mad, still I'm loved.

When I stomp around, still I'm loved.
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