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Wall of Voodoo


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Audio CD, October 22, 1991
$26.99 $13.94

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1. Longarm
2. The Passenger
3. Can't Make Love
4. Struggle
5. Ring of Fire
6. Granma's House
7. Enf of an Era (Live)
8. Tomorrow (Live)
9. Animal Day (Live)
10. Longarm (Live)
11. Invisible Man (Live)
12. Red Light (Live)
13. The Good, the Bad & the Ugly/Hang 'em High (Live)
14. Back in Flesh (Live)
15. Call Box (Live)
16. The Passenger (Live)

Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 22, 1991)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Restless Records
  • ASIN: B000003BFB
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #364,276 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Music

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Photos

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Biography

Best known for their alternative radio classic "Mexican Radio," Wall of Voodoo formed in Los Angeles in 1977, originally as a soundtrack company. Led by singer/songwriter Stan Ridgway and rounded out by guitarist Marc Moreland, bassist/keyboardist Bruce Moreland, keyboardist Chas Gray, and drummer Joe Nanini, the group issued its self-titled debut EP in 1980. With the additions of ... Read more in Amazon's Wall Of Voodoo Store

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
63%
4 star
31%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
6%
See all 16 customer reviews
Shh..man Ring of Fire is one of the best I've heard!
The Haze
If you wanna hear the freshly born Wall Of Voodoo or you are a hardcore fan looking for a great album, pick up "The Index Masters".
Jacobb T. Sackett
If you like this, pick up Stan Ridgway's first solo album after leaving Wall of Voodoo, called The Big Heat.
DoctorG

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Dave Eaton on August 27, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Wall of Voodoo's music is in it's own category; it is fun music; it is thinking man's music; all at the same time. This super extended version of their first album is worth it for just the first three songs: Longarm, Passenger, and "Can't Make Love". These are their "cleanest" fast-percussion, fast-lyrics and are in perfect form, stripped down to just the life of the music. The live songs are all cool because the guys were a fun bunch when playing live. Between this album and "Call of the West" was "Dark Continent" which is the best of the Stan Ridgway Wall of Voodoo. Later, Andy Prieboy (of "White Trash Wins Lotto" fame) led the singing on "Seven Days in Sammystown", their best album because it adds a romping dark richness. Buy them all. Beg for their reissue...I need backup copies!
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By George Dionne VINE VOICE on October 26, 2005
Format: Audio CD
The Good

Not having heard of Wall of Voodoo before, and having been four years old when this album originally came out, I instantly made comparisons to Devo and the B52's once I heard the opening tones and bombastic vocal delivery on "Long Arm". The guitar tones are stunning as each ring out with a biting twang. I think I even hear a slide whistle in there. The keyboard tones of "Passenger" are reminiscent of the Knight Rider theme mixed with any creepy horror movie theme.

It doesn't get any more experimental sounding than "Can't Make Love". Vocalist Stan Ridgeway sounds as though he's on the brink of madness. The Johnny Cash cover "Ring of Fire" shows how ahead of their time Wall of Voodoo was, because it uses effects and rhythms similar to a lot of hard rock music today. You may smirk the way `fire' is pronounced and everything else that sounds like it; very new wave. The live tracks are twenty five years old, yet you can't tell much of a difference from them and the songs from the EP.

That says a lot for the group because they didn't have the technology that the industry has today to make great live recordings. "End of an Era" has a melancholy sadness to it as it explores growing up. "Animal Day" has a percussive beat that you can dance too and lyrics you can laugh too. "Red Light" shows you that there's nothing that drummer Joe Nanini won't tap on, as you hear everything from symbols to wooden blocks. The disc (and live set) concludes with a fervent rendition of "The Passenger".

The Bad

Nothing notable

The Verdict

On The Index Sessions it's evident that Wall of Voodoo was way ahead of their time. Their combination of rock guitars and experimental sounds fell right in line with their peers, as well as establishing them in a league of their own. However, I don't think the music world was really ready for them yet. So what's your reason now?
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 21, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Two years ago, the only Wall of Voodoo song I had ever heard was "Mexican Radio," from the Call of the West album, and I didn't even know the name of the band that sang it. Until I met a man named Bessa who knew of this band called Wall of Voodoo, and an album called Index Masters. The first time I heard the song "Longarm," I listened carefully to the words, trying to figure out the meaning of its title. Obviously, the song is about a factory. As is the hit tune "Factory" from the Call of the West album. I wasn't totally sold on Index Masters, until I heard a song that changed my opinion about Wall of Voodoo forever. A remake of an old Johnny Cash song. A song called "Ring of Fire." For days I could listen to that song, thumping deep in the pit of my stomach with the bass turned all the way up, the screeching of the guitars as it wailed out a finale, and the half singin/half speaking voice of Stan Ridgway. Now, I am a die-hard Wall of Voodoo fan, at the young age of 18. I wasn't even born when they first joined forces. The fun, and interesting songs on the Index Masters album will live on forever, with generations after generations learning the wonder of Wall of Voodoo, thanks to The Almighty Bessa.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 17, 1999
Format: Audio CD
This is such a good album that probably wasn't successful commercially . It's a total injustice. No one since has made a sound like Wall of Voodoo-- swirling synthesizers, western guitars, quirky drums, lyrics about fictitious individuals. I like this album even better than the follow-up, Call of the West.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Bighairydoofus on January 31, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This is a great album, but not for the casual listener. If the only reason you like Wall of Voodoo is their hit "Mexican Radio", stick to the Call of the West album.
I want to say that the cover of Ring of Fire is a sterling example of what a cover song should be. It's not just re-played, it's re-invented; other examples would be Devo's cover of the Stone's "Satisfaction", Nirvana's cover of Devo's "Turnaround", Frente's cover of "Bizarre Love Triangle", the Damned/Motorhead's cover of "Ballroom Blitz" and Rasputina's cover of "Brand New Key". I could go on, but Wall of Voodoo's ring of fire is something special.
If you think you'll like the quirkyness of early Devo spiced with the flavor of spaghetti western music, you'll like this. Otherwise I can't recommend it.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jacobb T. Sackett on January 28, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The Index Masters really shows the raw side of an early Wall Of Voodoo. "Longarm" starts with a simple drum machine beat and a crunchy guitar. It is followed by wonderful synths and Stan's voice with a laid back "Let's go"... The song is catchy and filled with dark tones and eerie synth soundscapes. "The Passenger" is a very potent song about a hijacked plane, which rings true in these times of terrorist threats and violence. "Can't Make Love" with its tongue-in-cheek, brutally honest lyrics and its fun new wave atmosphere is a real treat to listen to, especially for an average day player, with Stan singing "I'm a nice guy/But I don't love you/ I just wanna sleep with you". The album continues with an eerie instrumental "Struggle", as well as the popular cover "Ring Of Fire", which is one of the most unique and ingenious covers I have ever heard. There is no drums, just a rhythmic synth creating a set rhythm for the song. Stan sings the song with a crisp, smooth country-tinged voice as Marc Morelands beautiful guitar fills and riffs create a real enjoyable tune. The song ends with Marc going ape on his guitar, using a bunch of distortion, but it isn't annoying or unpleasant, it really adds to the song. The strange instrumental "Granma's House" ends the studio set, and is then followed by ten live tracks from 1979, starting with the song that Stan said was the first song he and Marc wrote, it being then the first official Wall Of Voodoo song, "End Of An Era". The live tracks are lo-fi, but not as bad as some other reviewers made it out to be.
If you wanna hear the freshly born Wall Of Voodoo or you are a hardcore fan looking for a great album, pick up "The Index Masters". I would also recommend the extremely rare "Dark Continent", as well as "Call Of The West" to get the best of the Stan Ridgway/Joe Nanini Wall Of Voodoo era. Great stuff.
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