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36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buy this book!
The first volume of Fantagraphics projected reprinting of the complete Disney comics of Carl Barks is out and it is excellent. The volumes are to be in chronological order by volume (this is volume 6) although the stories are not arranged chronologically within the volume--a very minor problem. "Lost in the Andes" is perhaps Barks' best known story, also one of his...
Published on November 21, 2011 by J. K. Weston

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not perfect, but...
...gets the job done. I have a couple of reservations, though. First, it's obvious that some restoration, i.e. re-tracing and re-drawing, has been done to some of the frames. I'm a purist. To me, that's like touching up the Mona Lisa because it's gotten a bit dull in some spots over the years. Either there is a publishable original or reprint somewhere, or there isn't...
Published 9 months ago by Hans


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36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buy this book!, November 21, 2011
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This review is from: Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes (Hardcover)
The first volume of Fantagraphics projected reprinting of the complete Disney comics of Carl Barks is out and it is excellent. The volumes are to be in chronological order by volume (this is volume 6) although the stories are not arranged chronologically within the volume--a very minor problem. "Lost in the Andes" is perhaps Barks' best known story, also one of his best, and far superior to "The Golden Christmas Tree" which is the first long story by chronology. So placing it first makes a lot of sense. Every page, gag, and cover that should be in this volume chronologically is here. The long stories lead off the volume and are followed by the short stories. The short stories are actually reprinted in chronological order of Barks submission dates except for "Toyland", which should follow the radio quiz show story instead of preceding it, again, a very minor criticism.

The printing is excellent. The art size is about 98% of the size the comics were published back in 1949, and a little larger than the size in modern Disney comics. You won't notice the difference unless you lay down an original comic book page next to the reprint. The height is less than an eighth of an inch shorter in the book than in the old comics. Contrast this with Archive Editions, which typically reprint old comics about 83% of original size and it is obvious to the eye that they are much smaller. The coloring is very close to the original comic book coloring, except the yellow is a bit brighter and more gold. But it is clearly an attempt to reproduce with honor the look and coloring with which the comics were originally published. It is arguably better since the registration is generally much better than in the old comics.

With one exception, the stories appear to be printed here exactly as originally published over 60 years ago (although I have not compared all the short stories to the original comic books). The exception is "Race to the South Seas". Apparently the negatives for "Race to the South Seas" and "Darkest Africa" (to be reprinted in a future volume) were lost or are unavailable. When these two stories were reprinted in Europe in the 1980s, they were published from redrawn versions by Daan Jippes, apparently re-inked over blowups of the original comic book printings. "Race to the South Seas" is very good (to be expected from Jippes) but there are subtle differences in details throughout the story as well as less subtle differences in the drawings of the South Seas islanders. When Another Rainbow published the Carl Barks Library 25 years ago, it used the redrawn versions of these two stories. The notes at the end of the book notwithstanding, Fantagraphics used the exact same "Dutch Version" drawings that Another Rainbow did two decades ago. Comparing the Fantagraphics book with the Another Rainbow book clearly shows the drawings are the same. Comparing either with the original March of Comics giveaway clearly shows that it is different from both the reprints. Perhaps their intent was to not use the "Dutch Version" of the story, but that IS what they printed. Perhaps they can use modern scanning techniques to restore the original version of "Darkest Africa" before they reprint it. Otherwise the Barks content of this volume is almost perfect in every way. My commendations to Fantagraphics.

The notes and commentary, especially that of Don Ault, are excellent. Young kids will probably skip over the text, but adults will find reading it rewarding. Even long time Barks fans and scholars--I count myself in that number--are likely to find new and interesting facts and insights.

Small things I would like to see in future volumes: Covers and gag pages reprinted with the stories they were originally published with instead of isolated at the back of the book. A table of contents at the beginning of the book.

You can stop waiting. Buy this book. Buy future volumes. It really is Barks done right. The Another Rainbow books were done by fans for fans. They attempted to get it right and did a phenomenal job under trying conditions set by Disney. They made it possible for this and other later editions to happen at all. The Fantagraphics edition is clearly done with the mass market in mind, and it should succeed there, but it can also be appreciated even more by the connoisseurs.

CORRECTION: "Darkest Africa" was not re-inked by Daan Jippes, but by Dick Vlottes. Apparently the version of "Race to the South Seas" in this book is a composite of Barks and Jippes versions, but mostly Jippes. If the book gets a second printing, they intend to use the Barks version, which, unfortunately, was not yet available at press time (and may not be even now).

ADDENDUM, 8/19/12: Most of the relatively minor flaws in this book are corrected in the second reprint volume, Walt Disney's Uncle Scrooge: "Only a Poor Old Man" (Vol. 12) (The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library), which I have also reviewed. The coloring, in particular, uses a shade of yellow much truer to the original. That volume reprints the first 6 issues of Uncle Scrooge and is also highly recommended.

ADDENDUM, 11/29/13: In Walt Disney's Donald Duck: "Christmas On Bear Mountain" (The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library), volume 5 of the series in both publication order and chronological sequence, the overly intense yellows in previous volumes (12, 11, & 6) have all but disappeared, appearing on only a few scattered pages; and even volume 6 was a great improvement on earlier volumes. And the excessively gold "yellow" in volume 7 Lost in the Andes, fortunately, appears nowhere else. Perhaps that can be corrected when there is a true Second Edition (not just a second printing) to this book which also restores Carl Barks' original version of Race to the South Seas. Volume 5 was published earlier this month and, like the other volumes, is highly recommended.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you're a Barks fan, this is it, November 12, 2011
By 
Joseph Goodfriend (Seattle, WA United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes (Hardcover)
Barks fans had to wait decades for someone to finally begin comprehensively reprinting his work in color. Fantagraphics had done a superb job. The colors practically jump off the page. If you're new to Barks, you'll understand why his comics were Jerry Garcia's favorite reading material.

The full-length stories are 'Lost in the Andes!', 'The Golden Christmas Tree', 'Race to the South Seas!' and 'Voodoo Hoodoo'. The shorter stories include 'The Sunken Yacht', which will interest you if you're most familiar with the character Scrooge McDuck from 'DuckTales'. Turns out Uncle Scrooge wasn't always such a nice guy.
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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Barks done right!, November 15, 2011
By 
Geoffrey Hayes "Writer/artist" (Brooklyn, NY, United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes (Hardcover)
What makes this Fantagraphics volume so impressive?
1. It is comic book size, not an oversized art book. It is easy to read and to hold. Comic book reprints, as opposed to strips, ought to be printed in the same size as the original comics, regardless of how large the artist drew them.
2. No garish colors or airbrush effects, so that Bark's line can be appreciated for what it is. I was a little bothered by the consistent gold color that stands in for yellow in this book, but I'll get used to it. All the art has been newly colored and the designers have taken great pains to insure that these stories are as close to the originals as possible, so I'll forgive them this one change. On the plus side, all the colors are in register, something that was spotty in the Dell originals.
3. Non-coated paper.
4. Not in chronological order. There's no need for this. Although Barks' style varied with the years, due not only to his own development, but to changing formats from the publisher, all his stories stand alone. It's not necessary to read "Christmas on Bear Mountain" (Uncle Scrooge's first appearance) before reading a later Scrooge story. This edition offers a wide range of his best stuff.

There are some comics where I admire the art more than the text, but Carl Barks was such a great storyteller, it's impossible to look at the art without reading the words. That's why Barks is Barks.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Ultimate Carl Barks, December 21, 2011
By 
Ganapathy Subramaniam (Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes (Hardcover)
Length:: 1:04 Mins

The long wait is over and the long overdue reprint of the Duck man Carl Barks' evergreen stories are back.

First about the physical book.The book is wonderfully made, and is made to last. The quality of the paper is perfect, the crisp off-white, non-glossy medium does great justice to the fantastic pen and ink work of Barks, and brings out the colors in all its glory.

The book is fairly large, very nice hardbound, good to feel and curl into a couch with. The binding needs special mention, Nicely bound with printed cover. The print inside the book as well is amazingly sharp, as good as it gets.

For those of us drooling over the out of print and hard to find Cark Barks library (in either the black and white or the color) this is Godsend.

The book contains 220 odd pages.
Begins includes an introduction, talking about barks the stories and later on contains notes on the stories.

It has three sections,

THE ADVENTURES : Lost in the Andes!, The golden Christmas Tree, Race to the South Seas!, Voodoo Hoodoo !

THE SHOT STORIES : Toyland, The Crazy Quiz Show, Truant Officer Donald, Donald Duck's Worst Nightmare, Pizen Spring Dude Ranch, Rival Beachcombers, The Sunken Yacht, Managing the Eco System, Plenty of Pets

THE GAGS : Jumping to Conclusions, The True Test, Ornaments on the Way, Too Fit to Fit, Sleepy Sitters, Slippery Shine, Tunnel Vision

These are all stories from yesteryear and hence contain a magically simple world, with rib tickling fun. As Donald and his gang go about on long adventures, short excursions and day to day skits.

Page after page of glorious colorful stories, bringing back golden memories if you had grown up with, as well as awesome treat for new readers.

I am looking forward to the series, and should say this is my best buy of the year!
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Book Of The Year, November 15, 2011
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This review is from: Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes (Hardcover)
For the price, content and presentation is is clearly the Comic Book book of the year. It's astonishes me that we've had to wait all these years for The Complete Carl Barks Library. Get in here on the ground floor with the launch of this series of Disney's timeless classics. If you've never heard of Carl Barks you're in for a real treat. If you have, then you know you need to buy this book and at 13 dollars and some change; you have no excuse. This is one of those books that belong in every home for children of all ages.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Over 200 Pages of Pure Barksian Bliss... Just Buy It!, November 20, 2011
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This review is from: Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes (Hardcover)
If you are reading this I assume you already know who Carl Barks was, and why he deserves his place in the pantheon of the comics gods. (If not, get this book!) So, I'll keep this review focussed on what you find inside this marvelous book.

There are three sections:

The Adventures (long stories of at least 20 pages, some over 30)

'Lost in the Andes!'
'The Golden Christmas Tree'
'Race to the South Seas' (supposedly using rediscovered artwork thought lost for 60 years, but this has been challenged)
'Voodoo Hoodoo'

The Short Stories (each about 10 pages)

'Toyland'
'The Crazy Quiz Show'
'Truant Officer Donald'
'Donald Duck's Worst Nightmare'
'Pizen Spring Dude Ranch'
'Rival Beachcombers'
'The Sunken Yacht'
'Managing the Eco System' (should be 'Echo' rather than 'Eco')
'Plenty of Pets'

The Gags (One-pagers)

'Jumping to Conclusions'
'The True Test'
'Ornaments on the Way'
'Too Fit to Fit'
'Sleepy Sitters'
'Slippery Shine'
'Tunnel Vision'

To quote from the 'Editor's Note' on the last page, "The stories will be published in chronological order by *volume*, but not within each volume." All the tales in this book were published between December 1948 and August 1949. Future volumes will publish the entirety of Carl Barks's work on the Disney Ducks, although it is up to Fantagraphics to decide which years will be first to be published.

[This lack of chronology does not bother me one bit; I mention it only to save some 'purists' from grumbling.]

You also get a brief introduction by Donald Ault, which introduces us to Carl Barks the man. (He seems to have had a terrible time from 1993 to 1998, thanks to his "managers" who thought nothing of pushing a man in his nineties -- with failing eyesight -- to the very brink.)

And there are 'Story Notes' at the end of the book, comments on specific stories by Ault again, as well as by Stefano Priarone, Alberto Becattini, Francesco Stajano, Leonardo Gori, Jared Gardner, Craig Fischer, Rich Kreiner, and R. Fiore.

This last section also reprints the covers to the original comics in which 'Lost in the Andes', 'The Golden Christmas Tree', 'Voodoo Hoodoo', and 'Truant Officer Donald' first appeared. (The covers to the other comics were, mostly, the work of Walt Kelly, and have been dropped from what is after all a Carl Barks Library.)

The book is printed very slightly smaller than the Golden Age originals. On the other hand, we also get much better coloring without the awful bleeding that was the norm sixty years ago, on pages that are creamy rather than the dazzling white of some archival editions. And the binding is sewn rather than glued, so the pages lie flat with no gutter loss.

Above all the extras, the true reason to pick up this fine book is the work of Carl Barks, one of the most prolific and most gifted writers and artists from any era, from a time when he was at the top of his game.

Frankly this would be well worth it even paying full price, and with Amazon's discount it is a steal!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a great time to be a collector!, November 29, 2011
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This review is from: Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes (Hardcover)
There is so much great stuff being reprinted these days; it's a collector's dream come true. I'm collecting The Complete Peanuts, Turok Son of Stone, Archie Archives and a couple others, but, make no mistake about it, the Carl Barks Library will trump them all! No need to gush effusively or go into specific detail of what's in the book,(other reviewers have done that). I make my case this way: I own The Carl Barks Library put out by Another Rainbow in the 1980s, as well as many of the Gladstone volumes and a plethora of the original and reprint comic books, but this is the way I will be reading my Barks' stories from now on! If you are a Barks fan, you will love this book! Enough said.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Sheer Delight, November 19, 2011
By 
Bruce G. Taylor (Kensington CT USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes (Hardcover)
When I was a kid, I bought the monthly "Walt Disney Comics and Stories" mainly for the ten page lead-in Donald Duck stories as I now know were created by the great Carl Barks. This newly released hard cover book that I recently received is more than I ever expected. It is a beautifully bound hard cover 240 page book containing some of Bark's fine creations, restored in brilliant color on heavy grade pages. I'm almost tempted to wear gloves when I handle the book. There is an interesting introduction outlining Carl Barks' rather difficult life and career in which his artistry seemed to be his sole pleasure.

Among the stories included in this first release is "The Golden Christmas Tree," a full comic book length story that I distinctly remember having when I was nine or ten years old. Maybe I'm just trying to relive my childhood, but these comics were beautifully drawn and colored with often funny dialog. Some of the stories I hope will be released: "The Golden Helmet," a very funny adventure tale, "The Lemming With the Locket" with Uncle Scrooge, Uncle Scrooge in the land of Tra La La, "The Ghost of Sir Quackley" and the summer issue in which Donald and his Nephews, while camping out in the woods, become threatened by a forest fire. There was a memorable Halloween issue having a "Will-o-the Wisp" character. These were of the quarterly full-length Donald Duck issues that I always looked forward to as I am now looking forward to the next Fantagraphic Carl Barks collection.

Thanks to Amazon for making this great collection available.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book great, but be wary of Amazon's shipping method, November 27, 2011
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This review is from: Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes (Hardcover)
I won't delve in the book itself much, but its perhaps what you'd expect from a Carl Barks collection from Fantagraphics. However, I must say that I wasn't quite as impressed with these as I was with the Mickey Mouse Floyd Gottfredson collection, but that's just me and the source material differs. This book is definitely worth a purchase if you are a fan of comics, Disney, Donald, Carl Barks, etc.

On a different note, I'd like to give everyone a bit of a heads up on how I received my copy from amazon and what you may want to look out for. As many may know, amazon typically ships items in a brown cardboard that folds over the item, for a lack of a better description. With this book, the cardboard seemed a bit tight and the bottom of the book's spine is noticeably crushed and bent inward. If this would bother you, be sure to look your copy over when you receive it or, god forbid, purchase at a retail bookstore.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Carl Barks - An American Treasure, December 1, 2011
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This review is from: Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes (Hardcover)
I've read the glowing reviews of this book and agree with everything said. This is a great book, and the best part is that it's just the beginning of a complete series.

Waaaaay back in 1950 some long forgotten relative gave me for my birthday a year's subscription to Walt Disney's Comics and Stories. By the time half that year had expired I was aware, even at the tender age of eight, that there were more than one artist drawing the Donald Duck comics and making up the stories. There was a very noticeable difference. Of course, the "good ones" were created by a man named Carl Barks, but none of us knew that until decades later. Looking back (those of us with enough whiskers), we can appreciate what a tremendous talent he was, if only because he could impress our young minds then in exactly the same way he impresses us today. Thus, his stories are both timeless and "ageless."

A good friend of mine, a recent acquaintance, was a neighbor of Barks when he lived in Oregon, and was privileged to spend time with the great man in his home when he was doing the paintings of the Duck characters. He always talks of what a fine, lively, imaginative, intelligent person Carl was, and how decent, democratic and hospitable. I accept my friend's impressions without hesitation, because how could those wonderful characters and stories have come from any other sort of person?

Anyway, this book is attractive and well designed and constructed. The art is perfectly presented. And for $13.88, it is an absolute must...at least for me, and obviously for a great many others. I hope the publisher is able to continue this series to its full completion and maintain the superior quality demonstrated in this first issue.
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Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes
Walt Disney's Donald Duck: Lost in the Andes by Carl Barks (Hardcover - December 5, 2011)
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