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Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse: "Trapped on Treasure Island" (Vol. 2) (Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse) Hardcover – October 31, 2011


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Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse: "Trapped on Treasure Island" (Vol. 2)  (Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse) + Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse: "Race to Death Valley" (Vol. 1)  (Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse) + Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse: "High Noon at Inferno Gulch" (Vol. 3)  (Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse)
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Product Details

  • Series: Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse (Book 2)
  • Hardcover: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Fantagraphics; 1St Edition edition (October 31, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1606994956
  • ISBN-13: 978-1606994955
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 10.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #207,013 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Over time, Mickey’s personality becomes more refined…; scrappier, tougher and more determined to seek justice (or an adventure) regardless of the odds. …[T]his series is rich with detail, both in the strip itself and in the editorial handling of the material, [in a way] that puts other reprint projects to shame.” (Chris Mautner - Robot 6)

“…[A] revelation. As in his contemporaneous animated cartoons, this Mickey is a feisty, wisecracking daredevil… Gottfredson’s charmingly old-fashioned drawings accentuate the gags and briskly propel the plotlines.” (Gordon Flagg - Booklist)

“Gottfredson’s comics are as classy, funny and as slick as the Disney shorts from the same period.... A fine package, a full meal, and a perfect follow-up to volume 1, Walt Disney’s Mickey Mouse Vol. 2: Trapped on Treasure Island fills a gap long-neglected in animation history. Buy it.” (Jerry Beck - Cartoon Brew)

“…[A]s amazing as it sounds David Gerstein and Fantagraphics have managed to do it again: they have produced at the same time the best Disney comic book of 2011 and one of the best Disney history books of the year.” (Didier Ghez - Disney History)

“The Mickey Mouse books from Fantagraphics… feel like the Criterion Collection DVDs translated into comic strip compilations, a prime example of how to give the readers more than their money’s worth.... With Mickey Mouse: Trapped on Treasure Island, I’m already eager to see what Gottfredson did next. I’m in for the long haul.” (Greg McElhatton - Read About Comics)

“These Floyd Gottfredson-created adventure strips… are everything you want from a feature like this: exuberant, lovely-looking and a lot of fun.” (Tom Spurgeon - The Comics Reporter)

“The stories are dense, packing plenty of dialogue into the strips — and the themes are darker than the bright-eyed, factory-sealed tales of today.... The reproduction is crisp — the black inks are meticulous in their separation…. This dynamic look is a revelation in the life of the character who started it all for Disney.” (Alex Carr - Omnivoracious (Amazon.com))

“Can you believe that the tapioca-plain Mickey Mouse was… once a high-spirited adventurer...? He was in the original comic strips... It's one of the classics.” (David Allen - Inland Valley Daily Bulletin)

About the Author

Hired as a short-term replacement on the fledgling Mickey Mouse daily strip in 1930, Floyd Gottfredson (1905–1986) went on to draw the feature for the next 45 years. He created the most famous Mickey tales ever told in print.

David Gerstein is a comic book writer/editor and animation historian specializing in the Disney Standard Characters. His books include Mickey and the Gang: Classic Stories in Verse and Walt Disney Treasures—Disney Comics: 70 Years of Innovation. He lives in New York City, NY.

Gary Groth is the co-founder of The Comics Journal and Fantagraphics Books. He lives in Seattle.

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Customer Reviews

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This kind of stuff happens all through the book.
E. David Swan
I also came to learn that the great Mickey Mouse adventure stories by Gottfredson were actually reprints of the daily and Sunday Mickey Mouse comic strips.
Michael R. Brown
The perfect Christmas or birthday present for a friend or loved lone.
A. Grossman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael R. Brown on November 28, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Growing up I read many Walt Disney Comics. One of my main sources was the great "Walt Disney Comics Digest" put out by Gold Key Comics/Western Publications. I liked many of the comics they reprinted, but among the best were the "duck stories", especially the longer Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge adventures, by Carl Barks (tho like many of us, I would learn who Barks was many years later) and the Mickey Mouse stories by Floyd Gottfredson (tho it was much later that I learned their names).

I also came to learn that the great Mickey Mouse adventure stories by Gottfredson were actually reprints of the daily and Sunday Mickey Mouse comic strips. But what was frustrating, was that while Carl Barks materials were reprinted completely several times (and now are again being reprinted by Fantagraphics), no one had done a comprehensive reprint of Gottfredson's work. Until now.

This then is the second of what should be about 15 or so volumes reprinting all the dailies (and now also Sunday) Mickey Mouse adventure strips by Gottfredson. While he worked on the strip for several decades, I believe they will only go from 1930 to 1955, when the adventure stories ended in favor of gag-a-day strips (per editorial decree). And he also only worked on the Sunday strip for about 5 years. So with about 2 years per daily volume, there should be 12 volumes of dailies and 2 of Sundays.

Each volume will follow the same basic format. A great introductory essay that gives info on the strip and the current set of stories. Then the stories, broken up into distinct storylines with some introductory info on each.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By E. David Swan VINE VOICE on October 26, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In Volume 1 readers got a glimpse of the famous Mouse prior to his becoming a corporate logo. I was tremendously impressed by Floyd Gottfredson's work as well as Fantagraphics fantastic presentation and gave the book an unequivocal five stars. With volume 2 I start to equivocate.

Mickey has evolved into the now familiar unimpeachable good guy. I would contrast him with his contemporary Popeye the Sailor who, like Mickey and many depression era heroes, had a soft spot for widows and orphans. Unlike Mickey, his altruistic bent went hand in hand with some serious character flaws most notably a violent often uncontrollable temper. Mickey, on the other hand, is nearly perfect. Where Popeye would often find his attempts at good deeds blowing up in his face Mickey's goodness invariably turns out well but it was the multidimensionality of Popeye that made him such an interesting character. In addition to having characters flaws Popeye was also legitimately funny and Elzie Segar leveraged Popeye's uniqueness for all its worth. It's not that Gottfredson is incapable of humor it's that I don't think he is trying to make Mickey or Minnie humorous. Mickey is a good guy end of story. The only characters who are actually funny are Clarabelle, Horace Horsecollar and Dippy Dawg a.k.a. Goofy (who is actually very funny).

The other issue is that when Mickey comes out on top it often isn't so much because of his determination and grit but through sheer dumb luck. In the first story Mickey tries to raise money for orphans and starts walking the streets with a sandwich board soliciting donations.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Barat on November 25, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Volume 2 of Fantagraphics' GOTTFREDSON LIBRARY, which takes us up through the beginning of 1934, maintains the high production standards and copious ancillaries of the first volume. Its most signature achievement, however, is the delicacy with which it defuses the explosive racial stereotypes that litter "The Great Orphanage Robbery" and "Treasure Island," the two lengthy stories that take up much of 1932. "Presentist" hand-wringing and moral preening is kept to a minimum, and the black caricatures -- the "Uncle Tom" costumes that our heroes don to raise funds in "Orphanage Robbery," the incongruously Southern-accented cannibals of "Treasure Island" -- are "explained" and placed in historical context in a straightforward fashion.

As GeoX's exhaustive analysis of "Orphanage Robbery" makes clear, that story's cachet has mostly to do with the "notorious" blackface bits; the story itself is "bitty" and constructed in a rather ramshackle fashion, with a bizarrely cruel edge to boot. (It'll be hard for me to rip on the ineptitude of the police forces of Duckburg and St. Canard in the future after seeing what passed for "justice" in 1932 Mouseton.) "Treasure Island" isn't much better, but, as that story draws to an end, the classic MICKEY strip of the 30s literally begins to take shape with the arrival of Ted Thwaites as Gottfredson's inker. For some reason, Thwaites has not yet been included among those creators who rate mini-bios in the back of the book. I certainly hope that this oversight is remedied in the next volume, for the "slicker" look of the post-1932 MICKEY owes quite a bit to Thwaites.
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