Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Walt Kelly Unmasked! Secret and Original! The Pogo Poop Book: Latest Poop on Jack Acid Society, Prehysteria, Kluck Klams, Mouse into Elephant, Computer Commuter, Whose God Is Dead? Paperback – January 1, 1966


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$6.77

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster (1966)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0006BOUR2
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,781,297 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By wiredweird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on February 27, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the later Pogo collections, copyright 1966. As such, most of it is pointed political satire, more targeted towards whole attitudes and movements than individuals. Some of the old dragons, like the Klan, have very nearly been slain today, so Kelly's crusade against them may look like tilting at windmills to today's reader. In the early 60s, though, they were real threats worthy of all the worst that could be thrown at them. And Kelly did his very worst.

Maybe it won't look like much to current, media-jaded readers: Kelly's attacks foretold the "velvet revolution" of Eastern Europe. His most biting weapon against the Klan, for example, was a simple cold shoulder. "If you do that, go away to do it. Just go away." It's touching, and an encouraging reminder that you don't have to be a front-page hero to fight injustice. Simply standing firm against it works too, and maybe more effectively.

Other pieces include pointed parables in "Prehysteria," "Mouse into Elephant," and "Whose God is Dead?" And, in an unusual offering, Kelly presents "The Computer Commuter," a story in text with illustrated highlights. (If you've ever encountered the 'quants' of high-powered trading, it's especially funny.) And, of course, Kelly punctuates the collection with off-key lyrics and alliterative but baffling doggerel, the best since Charles Dodgson set his pen down.

//wiredweird
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
I was introduced to Walt Kelly's "The Pogo Papers" at a young age, loved the humor and style, It took me a few years until I understood that he wasn't just writing jokes and drawing comics - there was another message - and it was spot on.

Walt Kelly wrote parables, and presented them during an era when it wasn't polite to state one's political view openly, especially on the comics page. Kelly was very subtle and sarcastic when he ventured into that realm to the point of censure. Some papers refused to print what they thought was too far out of the mainstream, so Kelly drew the famous "Bunny Strips." These were benign alternative strips that featured two bunnies talking to each other, but they alerted his fans that he'd been censored by their local newspaper comics editor who didn't care for Kelly's political opinions.

There is no way that "The Pogo Poop Book" could have been printed as a series of strips in any paper of the time, let alone in today's political climate. Kelly skewered Communism/Socialism, Nazis, The KKK, The John Birch Society (aka The Jack Acid Society) and mocks those who blindly follow idiocy without thinking, and he did it with his amazing talent for sharp yet unoffensive wit.

I was a preteen when I bough my copy of the PPB, and it jarred me enough to re-read a lot of Kelly's work in a new light. The stories are good, graphics excellent, and I'm thinking of ordering a 2nd copy just to rip it apart and scan it page-by-page for the young tads to read before the book's unavailable to anyone.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Words cannot say how much my thoughts and words have been inspired by Walt Kelly and Pogo--an experience young people will never have again. This book is one of the best examples of Kelly's wild, sharp imagination and graphic prowess. The topical humor is going to be opaque for most readers (imagine reading today's Doonesbury twenty years from now), but the wordplay and, well, other kinds of play will endure. Read Pogo and you will see flashes of Calvin and Hobbes, Adventure Time, and animated adventures yet to come.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again