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I Want a Pony (Pony Pals #1) Paperback – Illustrated, November 1, 1994

Book 1 of 38 in the Pony Pals Series

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 10 years
  • Lexile Measure: 690L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks; Reissue edition (November 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0590485830
  • ISBN-13: 978-0590485838
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #270,620 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

The first book makes a great gift!
Debra Vitale
It isn't just the grownups giving the kids everything they want because the author can make them.
Talley Sue Hohlfeld
This book is great because it describes all the girls really good.
Mouse Fett

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Talley Sue Hohlfeld on May 24, 2007
Format: Paperback
I love this whole series. I'm a mom, and my daughter got them as hand-me-downs. I run around now recommending them to parents of [..] girls. (I think boys might find them annoying bcs there are no boys except rowdy ones, really.)

Each book has a conflict--a realistic one. And a painful one for the characters. Conflict is the essence of drama, and the quality of the conflict is important. These are great. They could happen in real life--they DO happen in real life. Someone wants a pony but can't have one; someone has trouble in school even though she works hard; grownups make decisions that take the fun away from children.

Each book also has a terrific way to resolve the problem. The girls develop a technique that helps them figure out how to solve their problem, how to change the grownups' minds. They each contribute an idea, they refine and modify one another's contributions, they make realistic assessments of what grownups would do. It doesn't always go smoothly, but the girls successfully act to get at least some of what they want.

Things always come out fine in the end, but even a skeptical grownup like me would have to say that the solution is believable. It isn't just the grownups giving the kids everything they want because the author can make them.

Another thing I really like is that the author does not gloss over the work and responsibility that is involved w/ owning a pony. And yet the books are never preachy.

I also like that the girls DO turn to grownups when they're problem solving or when they need help. They don't assume that they have to do everything themselves (the way Harry Potter does, and the way many OTHER kid-adventure books do). And yet, the girls take a very active role in trying to change their world.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Erika Sorocco on February 19, 2004
Format: Paperback
Lucinda (Lulu) Sanders has always wanted a pony, and now that she's forced to stay in the small town of Wiggins with her Grandmother while her Father explores the Amazon Jungle in Brazil, she thinks that she may just have a chance in getting what she wants. Besides, having a pony would make not having her Father alongside her much easier. Not to mention that she would be able to become Pony Pals with Anna Harley, and her pony Acorn, and Pam Crandal, and her pony Lightning. So when Lulu finds a pony that she knows is in serious danger, she wants to help her. But to help the pony, she'll need the help of two Pony Pals, and a lot of love.
Jeanne Betancourt has created a fantastic book series for young horse lovers with PONY PALS. The three girls (Pam, Lulu, and Anna) are fun characters, who will teach young horse lovers, and/or owners, how to care for ponies, treat them kindly, and just have tons of fun with both their ponies and friends. This is a must-have series for anyone who knows a horse-loving child between the ages of 5-12 years old. They will cherish this series for years to come, and it, in turn, will teach them just how hard owning a pony can be, but also how much fun owning one is.
Erika Sorocco
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 2, 2005
Format: Paperback
I loved the Pony pals since 2nd grade. Some nights I would read 5 a night. Now 5 years later I wonder if there were more Pony Pals books. The first one has to be my favorit. I read this one the most. So if you think your to old tio read pony pals your wrong. Just think I'm 13 and I still read them.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on November 21, 2005
Format: Paperback
The Pony Pals

By: Dalit Smolsky.

I've read all the books but here's an introduction.

Lulu, Anna, and Pam are girls that are best friends that are not just friends but they're pals. The ride their horses on a pony pal trail as they call it. They love riding and they have fun on barn sleepovers and camping.

Lulu is a girl that has no mother because she died when Lulu was 4; but has a father that went to the Amazon Jungle to study some kind of animal. Pam was a girl that had a mother who was a riding instructor and her dad was a horse veterinarian. Anna had a mom that worked in a diner and had made famous brownies.

They all rode their horses. Anna rode her horse named Acorn, Pam rode her horse named Lightning; and Lulu rode her horse Snow white.

The pony pals solved problems and many mysteries. They didn't give up since they had The Pony Pal Power as they called it. The last part of their adventures was when they came to their adults friends house and her horse died. Anna never gave up on him and she cried many hours. Anna rode Acorn on the carriage on a festival called the winter festival. There was also another festival. The festival had loads of fun. The people had rollercoaster's and best of all kids had horseback riding rides. They all had fun.

Anna didn't think that Acorn would react that good.

I recommend this book to people who like or love horses. This book is all about horses. I would rate it at a rate of 5 stars out of 5 stars. I loved this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "amandapandany" on February 7, 2002
Format: Paperback
In this book we meet a little girl named Lucinda, who lives with her grandmother because her mother died when she was four,and her father is away studying animals in the Amazon jungle of Brazil. Lucinda meets Anna, a girl who lives next door, and Anna's friend Pam, and together they form the Pony Pals.
In this first book of the series the girls try to save a pony named Snow White, who was caught in a barbed wire fence, and is hurt. With the help of her Pony Pals, Lucinda sets out to save the pony and find it a home. She gets a big surprise when she meets the pony's real owner, and the story gets more exciting from there.
I like this book because I love ponies. If you love ponies and you like adventure then you should read this book too.
Enjoy!
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Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Jeanne Betancourt grew up in rural Vermont, where she spent a lot of time playing on the dairy farm across the road from her family's apartment. At the time she had no intention of becoming a writer -- she took tap dancing classes and dreamed of becoming a Rockettes at Radio City Music Hall. Her rural upbringing would later provide ideas and background for many of her books.
After college and three years teaching in Vermont, Jeanne moved to New York City, where she taught junior and high school, and earned a masters degree in film studies from New York University. She wrote her first children's book in 1982, and since then has written a wide variety of acclaimed fiction and nonfiction books for young readers. Betancourt drew on her own memories and dreams while writing Kate's Turn, which focuses on a young teen's pursuit of a dance career; her own experience with dyslexia helped her create the title character of My Name Is Brian. And her rural upbringing, of course, helped her create the popular Pony Pals series.
Pony Pal fans are encouraged to visit ClubPonyPals.com to play games, make friends with other Pony Pals around the world, and enter a virtual Pony Pal world where they can ride with the Pony Pals.
Jeanne has written 76 books for children and young adults. Her most recent book is Ava Tree And The Wishes Three (Feiwel and Friends, Macmillan).
In addition to writing, Jeanne also loves to draw and paint. Her other interests include biking, and gardening. She still loves to dance.
In addition to writing books, Betancourt has also written for television, and has received six Emmy Award nominations, two Humanities citations, and the National Psychological Award for Excellence in the Media.
For more about Jeanne check out her website jeannebetancourt.com and her Facebook page.
She divides her time between an apartment in New York City and a home in Orient, New York.

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