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5.0 out of 5 stars It wil indeed take you higher
I can't remember the last time I had so much fun reading a book. It was like re-living the 60s and 0s, the two decades that shaped my life. Now, some 45 years later, the stories and photos put me right back in the commune I called home for several years. Parts of it were almost mesmerizing, as it elevated my consciousness to recall a very special time in my life...
Published 8 months ago by Len Howard

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Coffee table picture book psychedelic nostalgia for boomers
While I am pleased to see a postive book on hippies and psychedelics, this book is an obvious attempt to cash in on the 30th anniversity of the summer of love, 1967. While giving a general overview of the impact of psychedelic drugs in the sixties, it mainly focuses on the year 1967 and the cities of London and San Francisco. It tells the same old story we've read a...
Published on November 1, 1997


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Coffee table picture book psychedelic nostalgia for boomers, November 1, 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: I Want to Take You Higher: The Psychedelic Era 1965-1969 (Rock & Roll Hall of Fame & Museum) (Paperback)
While I am pleased to see a postive book on hippies and psychedelics, this book is an obvious attempt to cash in on the 30th anniversity of the summer of love, 1967. While giving a general overview of the impact of psychedelic drugs in the sixties, it mainly focuses on the year 1967 and the cities of London and San Francisco. It tells the same old story we've read a million times of the wonders of Haight-Ashbury and the events around the summer of 1967. New York and LA are given passing mentions, while the rest of the country and most of the world are totally ignored. There are alot of nice pictures, but there is also too much filler, i.e., 2 page spreads of crowds, people hanging out, etc. The usual cast of characters are here: Leary, Keasey, the SF bands, the Beatles, the Stones, etc. Being an american, the most interesting part to me was the articles about some of the british sceen makers, such as Peter Jenner, Indica Bookstore and the International Times. The real revelation was the poster work of Hapshash and the Coloured Court, a pair of London artists which certainly equaled if not outshown the San Francisco poster artists of the time. Too bad not more of their work was shown and less of crowd scenes. Overall, the book had alot of interesting trivia and pictures, but it generally lacked depth and had too much filler. Published by the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, the book is an obvious attempt to promote the major bands that came out of a certain scene, rather than an indepth study of the scene itself.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pure fluff--but entertaining, May 2, 1999
By A Customer
While this book has many great pictures from the decade and examples of artwork inspired by psychedelic rock, it is a very lightweight effort. Perhaps it was meant to be that way. Concentrating almost solely on London and the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco, the book consists mainly of reminiscences of aging hippies, most of whom were involved in the music and/or art scene of that era, either in San Francisco or London. Pretty much all of these consist of uncritical reminiscences about the hippie movement, whose downfall, if we are to believe these people, apparently came only from its eventual invasion by those looking to get rich off the movement (i.e., the establishment), totally disregarding the fact that those hucksters and exploiters were there from the beginning within the movement. One thing that also bothered me is that the rampant drug use of the period was presented almost completely as a positive thing. Indeed, it was glorified. With the exception of mentioning that Syd Barrett apparently became emotionally unhinged at least in part due to his use of LSD, there is almost no mention of the lives destroyed by the hedonism and drug use of the period, including such famous rock pioneers as Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, and Jim Morrison, to name the most prominent. While it was interesting and entertaining to read many of these reminiscences, I wanted to know more. I wanted the authors and editors to dig a bit deeper than the superficial outline of that period's history that we've heard about before. One good effort in that direction was the timeline that was at the bottom of every page, spanning the years from 1965-1969 throughout the course of the book. Basically, I recommend this book, but mainly for the great photo spreads and not as much for the commentaries and reminiscences.
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5.0 out of 5 stars It wil indeed take you higher, October 19, 2013
By 
Len Howard (Las Vegas NV USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: I Want to Take You Higher: The Psychedelic Era 1965-1969 (Rock & Roll Hall of Fame & Museum) (Paperback)
I can't remember the last time I had so much fun reading a book. It was like re-living the 60s and 0s, the two decades that shaped my life. Now, some 45 years later, the stories and photos put me right back in the commune I called home for several years. Parts of it were almost mesmerizing, as it elevated my consciousness to recall a very special time in my life.
Kudos to James Henke and his gang of devoted crazies for providing us all with a flashback on the years that changed a generation.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not much new information in the text, but the photos and list of songs are excellent, October 6, 2012
I WANT TO TAKE YOU HIGHER is a glossy coffee-table book published in 1997 to accompany an exhibition on the psychedelic era at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. James Henke contributes an introduction, and then we proceed chronologically through the period 1965-1969, alternating between San Francisco (written by Charles Perry) and London (written by Barry Miles). Nearly every page has boxed text relating some anecdote from a participant of the scene. Finally, at the end of the book there is a list of the top 100 psychedelic songs compiled by Jon Savage, split evenly between American and British bands.

I've read a great deal about the British counterculture, including previous books by Barry Miles, and there's little new information here in the text. Also, the chronology suddenly stops in 1969 with a photo of Altamont, with not even the briefest dissection of why the era came to an end.

Still, this book is worthwhile for any one interested in the topic for two reasons. The first is the abundant collection of photos, many of which I had not seen before. Many books on the 1960s feature the same photos time and time again, so I WANT TO TAKE YOU HIGHER offers something fresh. The other nice aspect of the book is Jon Savage's listing of psychedelic songs, which includes many bands not generally remembered today. If you want more psychedelic listening than just e.g. the Beatles and Cream, this book will be helpful.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great read!, March 4, 2000
By 
karla (somewhere over ther rainbow) - See all my reviews
This review is from: I Want to Take You Higher: The Psychedelic Era 1965-1969 (Rock & Roll Hall of Fame & Museum) (Paperback)
i found that this was a wonderful book. i was not around during the sixties, but i have been in love with them for a while. this book is a great trip back to the sixties for those of us who weren't fortunate enough to be there, and i'm sure it is great memories for those who were. i would reccomend this book to anyone in search of information about the sixties/hippies. it is definately a must read!
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fun book, May 27, 2011
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It's hard to come by good material about this era. Some of it is pretty cheesy, but I enjoyed this book a lot and I would recommend it.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Photographs, Killer Interviews, September 29, 1999
By A Customer
This book is an excellent portrayal of life in the 60's. It is great nostalgia for those who were there, and a great taster for those who wish they were.
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I Want to Take You Higher: The Psychedelic Era 1965-1969 (Rock & Roll Hall of Fame & Museum)
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